Too HOT to hike ??

12:08 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I'll admit it -- I'm not cut out for extreme heat.

It hit 101F-degrees here near the Chesapeake Bay today.   Same forecast for tomorrow.

I stayed local yesterday and today.   Originally (a week ago) I was looking toward trying some more light-to-moderate hiking at nearby State Parks.

( I should mention that when I say, "trying" ... I am recovering from several surgeries, and have recently been granted clearance by my surgeons ).

When the temps started hitting the 90s, I bagged the idea.

What do you folks do in these days of extreme heat and humidity ?

"Press on, regardless" ?  ( hike any way )  What pleasure is derived, pray tell?

                                                      ~r2~

12:14 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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Honestly, just stay hydrated. I have been playing around on a ladder on the side of a house that has aluminum siding for a few days. I don't mind the heat at all(yesterdays heat index was around 106.) The humidity on the other hand is something I could do without.

2:16 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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All I know is when it's that hot I sweat like a pig and chaff like...........well, till it hurts really really bad.  This is the time I get some beer and go fishing and wait another day to hike.  At my house (elev. 500ft above sea level) we have not had a day above 76 deg this year.  I'm very greatful for that.

8:15 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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Louisiana is running over a hundred with almost matching humidity.  This is a good time to check gear & equipment INSIDE!

8:37 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm "thinking ahead" ( to cold weather ).

Just pulled-the-trigger on a minus 40 degree sleeping kit.

Offers some solace to this oppressive nightmare.

                                                  ~r2~

8:55 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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Hike in Maine the temps are in the 80's. Presently in my state herd it's 105  and add humidity on top. Thats why Flip Flopping is where it's at. If Not slack pack.

9:03 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I just bring about 5 or 6Lof water with me, wear a cotton shirt, and hit the trails. I choose cotton to hike in on the dog days of summer because it is much cooler than anything else, especially if there is a breeze. Yes, it takes forever to dry, but who cares, its sooooo much cooler due to evaporative cooling.

It was 105 heat index here yesterday, with stupid high humidity. I am with apeman, when it is super oppressive If i don't have a preplanned backpacking trip, then I will just go fishing. It is nice to be standing in the middle of a cool stream fly fishing!

If I am hiking, I try to plan my hikes to hit up some nice swimming holes.

Whereever you are, remember to stay hydrated. You can quickly get into some serious trouble if you don't have enough water, or have no way to get more. On a normal trip I carry about 3L(1L for the dog). On dog days of summer I bring at least 5L and sometimes 6L and leave the pups at home. I usually drink every single drop of water.

***Remember to replace your electrolytes!! If you are drinking and sweating that much you will quickly become depleted, which can cause you to become disoriented, confused, naesea, muscle cramps, etc. I usually bring a few packs of gatoraide to mix in. But a pinch of salt and sugar in your water has the same effect if your on a budget.***

9:29 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I think I wrote up a little essay in a trip report once on camping in this heat and how to make it more enjoyable---if possible.  I don't remember it all but here are some of the main points:

** Dry ridges can be hot and bothersome, while shady creek valleys can be cooler though buggy.

**  Bring out stick incense and burn next to the tent or in camp to help dispel the bugs---gnats, noseeums, mosquitoes.  Just don't burn a hole in your thermarest.

**  Hike in the earliest morning hours---languish in the afternoon.

**  When all seems lost, zero out a few days in a campsite next to a wilderness creek (many come to mind), and spend all day in the water and on the rocks sunbathing.  A person can submerge in cold creek water and actually verge on hypothermia---then get out and slowly warm back up.

**  Seek out places with the highest ground, like Mt Rogers in Virginia or Shining Rock in NC.  At 6,000 feet, these places offer some amount of relief to Southeast backpackers.

**  Obviously, never set up camp in the sun, find shade or find deep shade.  Be thankful most of the southern Appalachian trails are in shade.

**  Hike in a wet t-shirt and shorts---if possible soak yourself at all the little creek crossings.

**  As in other tough conditions, do less miles and less hours a day backpacking.

**  There's no magic wand for relief. At the end of each spectrum (too cold, too hot), Miss Nature tests our resolve and our heart and our intent.  Getting out is more important that whatever condition is current---so be thankful just to be able to hump the ruck no matter what.

**  Oh, and get used to living in a headnet.

12:31 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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It was terrible here the last few days.  I managed a 12 mile day hike the other day loaded down with water bottles (just trying to keep me legs).  I was done before noon, so it wasn't awful yet.

12:51 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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Wimps. It peaked at 90 a few days ago.  Thought it was cool out. I'll take heat any day over cold.

Don't hike in the sun. Hike somewhere there's shade. Keep hydrated. DO NOT WAIT UNTIL YOU ARE THIRSTY TO DRINK WATER. Mix in some gatorade or similar if your out for an thirty minutes or more . 

1:01 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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This is simply not enjoyable.

I'm not Lawrence of Arabia ... nor, one of those morons running that "Hot 'Lanta" marathon ... or traversing Death Valley ... just to say, " I did it ! ".

How many days 'till October ?

                                                  ~r2~

1:30 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

I'll take heat any day over cold.

 SAY WHAT???

1:37 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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Tipi Walter said:

ocalacomputerguy said:

I'll take heat any day over cold.

 SAY WHAT???

 Uhhhhhh, yeah, what Tipi said... I now have a new thread idea.... :)

3:12 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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Here in Arizona its hot all summer even here in northern Arizona in Flagstaff at 7000 feet. Its the edge of the Colorado Plateau. Its just 77 today during our monsoon season, much cooler than where you are but it gets into the 80-90s.

To me its hot compared to Jackson Hole Wyoming where a 1000 miles north its much cooler and theres still snow to be hiked to within a half hour of the trailhead.

Here I stay indoors most of the time or am riding my bicycle which is way cooler than driven in a car. Went with a friend to Walmart a couple days ago and her car was like a humid oven inside.

My room here is a cement block sided place so it generally stays about 10-20 degree's cooler inside. The door faces east so the morning sun comes in for a few hours, but mid to late afternoon is much better.

I drink a lot of liquids and have a fan blowing constantly to stay cooler.

4:10 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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sorry dennis but it's not in the 80's here in maine. Hit triple digits yesterday, 97 the day before, and 96 outside right now.

Count in the humidity and the heat index was way up there.

4:11 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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i'd rather hike and climb in 40 below then hike in anything over 80.

9:40 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I much prefer cool to cold weather, but with a little practice and a shady trail alongside a creek it's not so bad in the heat.

Today it was 96 degrees ambient temp, and over 110 degrees with the heat index in Charleston SC.

I wear very loose clothing, no underwear, a hat, sunglasses and sandals. You keep your clothes damp and stay out of direct sunlight even if you have to use a umbrella, sombrero, or a piece of cardboard over your head.

A wet white towel or T shirt on your head makes all the difference in the world if you don't have a hat and you have to be in the sunlight.

I'm not a big fan of summer even though I live close to the ocean, but I love being outdoors so much I don't let it stop me.

11:14 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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It was pushing 100 degrees here today.  I was out for about six hours, mostly in the sun.  I handle the heat fine, but I sure drank a lot of water!

11:20 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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JimDoss said:

It was pushing 100 degrees here today.  I was out for about six hours, mostly in the sun.  I handle the heat fine, but I sure drank a lot of water!

 I stopped counting when I got past 10 litres of water consumed  today.

I don't think I urinated at all.

Hmmm ....  [ insert face-palm emoticon ].

                                                ~r2~

11:59 p.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I prefer heat; cold makes all my old injuries ache, while heat is soothing.  Just drink tons of water, and get used to being sticky.

Humidity is minimal here out west, but our actual temps are often what your heat indexed temps back east are.  I think acclimation makes the difference, and why you hear fewer westerners complaining about the heat; instead we tend to whine about temps below 65º.

Ed

12:30 a.m. on July 24, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

I prefer heat; cold makes all my old injuries ache, while heat is soothing.  Just drink tons of water, and get used to being sticky.

Humidity is minimal here out west, but our actual temps are often what your heat indexed temps back east are.  I think acclimation makes the difference, and why you hear fewer westerners complaining about the heat; instead we tend to whine about temps below 65º.

Ed

 

Yeah ... and freak when it rains 1/2 inch.

[insert DOUBLE face-palm emoticom ]

                                                 ~r2~

2:45 a.m. on July 24, 2011 (EDT)
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I don't go hiking in the summer here in KY.

I much prefer fall, winter, and early spring.

The heat and humidity are the obvious reasons for this sentiment, but also, there's just not much to see.   My favorite local destination, Red River Gorge, is known for its rock formations, recess caves, arches and natural bridges - very few of which can be seen through dense summer foliage.

For my summer vacations, I traditionally head upwards in elevation and/or latitude.  

 

KD

7:36 a.m. on July 24, 2011 (EDT)
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I much prefer winter, but I'll hike in a 100 degree dry heat like out west anyday. 100 degrees here on the east coast and 100 degrees out west are totally different animals.

12:38 p.m. on July 24, 2011 (EDT)
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TheRambler said:

I much prefer winter, but I'll hike in a 100 degree dry heat like out west anyday. 100 degrees here on the east coast and 100 degrees out west are totally different animals.

 Awe yes, that whole 99.999999% humidity thing....

1:29 a.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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TheRambler said:

..100 degrees here on the east coast and 100 degrees out west are totally different animals.

 But 100 degree on the heat index is the same level of discomfort, no matter where measured.  That is the whole point of the index!

Ed

1:48 a.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Do you prefer being broiled, or steamed?

1:54 a.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I am going with none of the above. I love late fall-winter. I don't mind the heat but the humidity levels here in the east can make things quite miserable.

8:08 a.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Just got back from southern Colorado last week.  One morning I woke up with ice around the rim of my coffee cup.  Highs got to 80 one day.  Base camp was at 6800 ft.  Why do I live in Louisiana?

9:48 a.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Guyz said:

 Why do I live in Louisiana?

 

Mardi-Gras ?   Catfish?    Crawdads?

                                                      ~r2~

11:21 a.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Don't like heat? Come to the Cascades.  Its SNOW, SNOW, SNOW! Late meltoff.

Swim in this lake for the cure to heat and humidity.  There is some ice free water if you look closely.
07232011374.jpg

Camped here last night.

 

As far as beating heat goes, I hike in a white long sleeve cotton tshirt or a light weight white dress shirt.

11:29 a.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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FromSagetoSnow said:

Don't like heat? Come to the Cascades.  Its SNOW, SNOW, SNOW! Late meltoff.

Swim in this lake for the cure to heat and humidity.  There is some ice free water if you look closely.
07232011374.jpg

Camped here last night.

 

As far as beating heat goes, I hike in a white long sleeve cotton tshirt or a light weight white dress shirt.

 I hike in speedos and hip waders.... J/K(maybe.)

11:46 a.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

Guyz said:

 Why do I live in Louisiana?

 

Mardi-Gras ?   Catfish?    Crawdads?

                                                      ~r2~

 4lbs of tasty greatness... ALL MINE :)
crawdads.jpg

1:08 p.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Nice appetizer;)

10:17 p.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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we canceled our 20 mile hike this weekend when the temp was 104 , i like hot weather but coal miner hubbie doesnt do well in the heat, so instead we stayed at the campground with the family and went kayaking and geocaching instead,turned out to be a fantastic weekend.

10:54 p.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Never mind the hike, how do the mountain bikers do it ? The trick for me/photography in the woods is slow walking, lots of breaks and water and stay in the forest trails (shade) works wonders. I see the deer sitting in the forest shade on ridges catching a nice breeze, which also helps to keep the bugs off, very smart !

Take care,

Dwayne Oakes

http://dwayneoakes.zenfolio.com

 

10:54 p.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Welcome aboard, Jen.

Abandon all hope ... all 'ye who enter here ....

Don't worry ... staying overnight in a tent is NOT mandatory to be here.   Some of us don't even use tents.   We use things called tarps, bivys, shelters, hammocks.

                                                ~r2~

12:46 a.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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@ KLUTZY- What part of Pa are you in, I'm in Pittsburgh.... not that you could tell by the name...

...Oh by the way, welcome to Trailspace.

12:55 a.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Living in Phoenix summer is just no fun! Sure its a dry heat most of the time, but when its a dry 115 you can feel the sun burning you, literally. Staying out in it for extended time requires a good hat, loose light colored cotton clothing that gives full coverage. Yes I said the dreaded "C" word. Cotton absorbs your sweat then gives the evaporation to help cool you, kinda sorta. Shade is hard to come by in the deserts, if you find a tree or bush big enough for shade its usually so small that once you get by or into it you've lost whatever breeze was blowing.

Now its monsoon season and its nolonger a dry heat. Tho not the serious humidity you all get back east its been running in the high 50-60% range and still hitting 108-110 degrees. (thats not the heat index rating but the actual temp in the shade) Its totally miserable. 

Bottom line is I dont go into the deserts this time of year, ITS TOO FRIK'N HOT! I do go to the local Mtn. Park to get my excersise, but Im outta there by 9:00am. But you wont catch me even considering a lengthy trip.

I just got back from a 3 day trip up around Flagstaff,AZ (trip report coming) 7000 feet elevation and plenty of trees make for much cooler temps and enjoyable summer hiking. I'll go back into the deserts again in December.

 

Welcome to TS KLUTZYCHICK

8:17 a.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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azrhino said:

Staying out in it for extended time requires a good hat, loose light colored cotton clothing that gives full coverage. Yes I said the dreaded "C" word. Cotton absorbs your sweat then gives the evaporation to help cool you, kinda sorta. 

 

 

I have problems with cotton treating me like a file.  If here is any movement between the fabric and skin when wet, it will eat me up.

8:33 a.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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rick i am just about an hour south of you in little eighty four .

robert  this weekend was full of wonderful first, first time in a tent, first time seeing bears outside of the zoo ,50 feet from a momma and two cubs,first time kayaking ,and first time seeing a bald eagle it was breath taking, yeah theres no going back now.

 

10:39 a.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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KLUTZYCHICK said:

rick i am just about an hour south of you in little eighty four .

robert  this weekend was full of wonderful first, first time in a tent, first time seeing bears outside of the zoo ,50 feet from a momma and two cubs,first time kayaking ,and first time seeing a bald eagle it was breath taking, yeah theres no going back now.

 

 BINGO ... Jen !

Cool experiences, for a 'newbie'.   Hmmm ... dunno (?) 'bout the bears ....

Even thought they were blacks, still ... with the momma ....  I'm sure you had the presence of mind not to do anything that would seem provoking or threatening to the cubs.   We DO NOT want to read about you in the "news".

Balds ... great !    They are magnificent!

I'm fortunate in seeing them regularly.   Three of them roost regularly in a big tree about 50 feet from my former-wife's house.   I visit the place, as I have "visitation privileges" with  "Smoke" -- the Russian Blue in my avatar photo-image.

Susie May (former wife) is terrified that the Balds are going to snatch-up Smoke.   Rightly so.

                                                     ~r2~

2:53 p.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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KLUTZYCHICK glad you had a good first experience. Thats sooooo important for folks to keep wanting more. The real  cool thing is that whether its the 1st, 2nd or 100th time those experiences are still breathtaking each time.

Welcome to the sweet addiction of the outdoors, I hope you continue to get out there and enjoy as much as possible.

3:15 p.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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I am so glad I live in the pnw.Hiked 3000 ft gain 5 miles this weekend up above Mc Neil point on the west slope of MT Hood.Nice breeze,not to hot and not to cold.Slept out at 7000 ft between 2 snow fields with a great cross wind.Natures best.Was raised as a kid in Ohio and once I saw places like the Cascades I never looked back.You guys have some awesome country but the heat and humidity is way to much for this guy.ymmv

3:25 p.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Guyz said:

Just got back from southern Colorado last week.  One morning I woke up with ice around the rim of my coffee cup.  Highs got to 80 one day.  Base camp was at 6800 ft.  Why do I live in Louisiana?

 I ask myself the same question daily.

Being in South Louisiana and Mississippi, it is way to hot to hike right now. I actually got a mild case of heat exhaustion weekend before last on a trail in MS. Took me twice as long to finish the trail as it usually does. Thing is, with the high humidity, your sweating does not help cool you. Once your core temp is up, it is up. I even dunked my hat and shirt in a pool of water to no avail. What finally helped was it clouded up and rained. That seemed to cool me down. Summer hiking is not fun down here.

6:47 p.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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The heat is so dry here in SoCal, that unless I'm in Palm Springs when its 110 plus (I've seen as high as 123) I just pack extra water, plan my route for water sources when needed, and wear light cotton - don't mind it a bit. I also take my time on the hike. I do draw the line at 105-110 degrees or thereabouts depending on the heat index.

My kids won't go out with me in temps above 95 or so...

Went for a 6 mile light trail run last Friday when it was in the 90's. Don't know the exact temp. Felt fine but polished off a liter of water in 50 minutes and was still thirsty when I got in the car and drank a Gatorade...

9:55 p.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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" BINGO ... Jen !

Cool experiences, for a 'newbie'.   Hmmm ... dunno (?) 'bout the bears ....

Even thought they were blacks, still ... with the momma ....  I'm sure you had the presence of mind not to do anything that would seem provoking or threatening to the cubs.   We DO NOT want to read about you in the "news"."

wellllll... thankfully after we heard the very loud crashing,which we really did think was the deer we had just spooked, hubbie had a "what was that "moment and stopped walking , i should mention we were bushwacking no trails for us geocachers , at that moment i thought "better not be a damn bear" i have a healthy fear of things that can bite my head off , so yeah look around hubbie and there she was  at first we were going to just take a few steps back and be still then he seen the cubs and we promptly turned our butts back to the road walking with haste,and not once did i scream like a girl or passout, (i have however passedout because of dogs before) now heres the and on the news tonight portion of the show....as crazy geocaching fools we had to go back the bears stopped us about 60 feet from the find, yep just passed where they were at..hmmm so scared out of my mind and hubbie laughing at me,not his first bear, we tromped our way back in and had a turkey scare the living crap out of both of us ....oh yeah we both jumped and peed a little......so if the headline reads..TWO HIKERS FOUND DEAD WITH NO VISIBLE MARKS BUT LOOK LIKE THEY WERE SCARED TO DEATH!!!! NEXT AT 11 yep that will be us and blame the turkeys no animal should hide that well and sound like a hellicopter landing on you !!

10:16 p.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Yeah ... I've had a Tom poke up and fan his tail feathers with such a tremendous report, that I think I pee'd myself, also.

Wow !   That was LOUD!

                                                  ~r2~

1:35 a.m. on July 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Uuuumm Duff and cold

8:07 a.m. on July 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Grew up in northern Wisconsin, the ruffed tail grouse can scare the living day lights out of you too!

10:13 a.m. on July 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Guyz said:

Grew up in northern Wisconsin ....

 

 ... and now living in Louisiana ???

Where's your next move, Guy?   The Equator ?   Hades ?

                                                  ~r2~

10:24 a.m. on July 28, 2011 (EDT)
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10 years Army Infantry.  Can't seem to stay in one spot.

1:14 p.m. on July 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Guyz,

 

I had my first Grouse encounter earlier this year in the Smokies. You are so right; it was weird and alarming the way those things hiss.....

 

My encounter happened simultaneously with a black bear encounter. It was a freaky scene for a few seconds there.

1:45 p.m. on July 28, 2011 (EDT)
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The ultimate cure all for warm weather on the trail. This model offers the latest and greatest in moisture management.


sumo-350a.jpg

1:49 p.m. on July 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Why the Sumo belt / loin-cloth ?

                                                    ~r2~

5:19 p.m. on July 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

Why the Sumo belt / loin-cloth ?

                                                    ~r2~

 ...I dunno, its better than the alternative?

8:18 p.m. on July 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick ~

[ insert face-palm emoticon ]

We need to tawk, my son ....

                                                  ~r2~

8:29 p.m. on July 28, 2011 (EDT)
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when It gets to be hot like this, I usually destination hike to rivers of lakes.. hang out a day or two then hike out... For me, it's about being out there, not how far I go

8:33 p.m. on July 28, 2011 (EDT)
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TheRambler said:

I much prefer winter, but I'll hike in a 100 degree dry heat like out west anyday. 100 degrees here on the east coast and 100 degrees out west are totally different animals.

 sure are the humidity here in the SE will kill you!!

8:11 a.m. on July 29, 2011 (EDT)
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Patman said;

My encounter happened simultaneously with a black bear encounter. It was a freaky scene for a few seconds there

That was a TP moment;)

9:41 a.m. on July 29, 2011 (EDT)
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At least in the Winter you can put on more clothes...

12:48 p.m. on July 29, 2011 (EDT)
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getting off-topic a little, but Robert, what -40 bag did you end up with?

i have occasionally frozen a camelback reservoir overnight as my backup, then loaded the second reservoir with both icecubes and water.  the frozen camelbak thaws in a hurry in this kind of heat (i'm in Maryland too), but it stays cooler.

whoever said cotton is best for evaporative cooling - try underarmour heat gear.   same evaporative cooling, but it dries faster and doesn't bunch or chafe like cotton. 

2:10 p.m. on July 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I use the underarmour heat gear also.  It works the best for me.  It doesn't hold as much water, but it has great cooling effect.

3:46 p.m. on July 29, 2011 (EDT)
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leadbelly2550 said:

..whoever said cotton is best for evaporative cooling - try underarmour heat gear.   same evaporative cooling, but it dries faster and doesn't bunch or chafe like cotton. 

I am telling you guys, those $10 Hawaiian shirts work well in heat, but I guess they lack the "that's cool" factor of the so-called tech solutions.  My avatar is from a trip to Joshua Tree; we just hiked four miles to our destination, it was 90º in the shade, and that pack weighed 60 pounds, including four gallons of water.  Note: my shirt doesn’t look soggy, such is the wicking and evaporative performance of the fabric.

Ed 

5:02 p.m. on July 29, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

I guess they lack the "that's cool" factor of the so-called tech solutions.  Ed 

 Says who? I am getting a little bored with the same ol same ol... Sometimes the best solutions are not the most technically advanced. :)

11:40 p.m. on July 29, 2011 (EDT)
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ED - Ive got a few of those Hawaiin shirts that I wear all the time in the summer. They are very breezy and cool. I never thought of wearing one for hiking. Been wanting to give it a try since you first mentioned it. Mine are made of thin Rayon and one is silk. My main concern has been how they would hold up to the shoulder straps working em over? And the brite colors acting as Bee magnets. 

This I vow to you Ed........ my next hike in the Mtn. Park I will try the stylish flowery Hawaiin shirt. It will probably be in the high 90 - low 100 temps and of course no lack of sunshine. Will report back, might be a week or so due to work schedule.

Ive got a MH Canyon shirt that by itself is pretty uncomfortable and sticky. Wearing a wife beater underneath makes it a whole lot better. do you wear the Hawaiin alone or with something under it? 

3:42 p.m. on July 30, 2011 (EDT)
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azrhino said:

ED - Ive got a few of those Hawaiin shirts.. ..made of thin Rayon and one is silk. My main concern has been how they would hold up to the shoulder straps working em over? And the brite colors acting as Bee magnets...

The silk sounds like one of the better shirts, quality wise, but I would pass on it for cooling purposes.  Use the cheap synthetic ones.  I don't wear anything under the shirt.  As for durability, washing them beats them up more than the backpack, if that provides some basis for comparison.  At $10, however, you will get more than your moneys worth.  As for bees, I haven't noticed a problem, but admitly only a few of my regular venues have a bee presense.

Ed

12:25 a.m. on July 31, 2011 (EDT)
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After looking at what Ive got the silk will not be the shirt of choice being as it is Jet Black with Gold designs. The Black would be just to hot in the sun, and yes it was a bit more pricey then the others. So Red Rayon it'll be, that one is kinda worn anyhow so wont bother me if it gets trashed.

1:46 p.m. on July 31, 2011 (EDT)
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Just read on the 'net ... Upper-MidWest (USA) hottest July in 75 years.

                                                   ~r2~

7:53 a.m. on August 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Just confirmed:

Many areas of the country (East of the Rockies) have had the highest JULY temperatures since 1871.

I really don't remember.  

                                                     ~r2~

7:12 p.m. on August 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Today was the day for the Hawaiin shirt test. Left home it was mid 90's and dont know for certain but believe it was maybe 101 or so when i returned to the truck and typical Phoenix.... not a cloud insight and the broiler (sun) on high. Headed for the South Mtn. Park 10 mins. from home.
2ihp98.jpg

destination was this little slice of shaded heaven aprx. 3 miles on the Hidden Valley trail
2.jpg 

After about 2 miles and some elevation gain Im thinking "Yes its too hot to hike!"
2tq5.jpg

Besides being the most stylish fellow on the trail the shirt performs pretty well. It soaks up the moisture and is very breezy and cooling about as well as can be expected with the temps and hot breeze. With out a breeze tho It definitly feels sticky to me.  I was surprised that it didnt become a Bee magnet as most brite colors do in the deserts here. Even tho the shirt is very thin it gave enuff protection from the pack straps bothering me. Was only a small hydro pack so cant say how it would do with a heavier pack.

For me I think cotton is more comfortable, not as breezy but just feels better. I might try again with a cotton tank under it to soak up the moisture but still get that breezy effect.

If your someone that doesnt like cotton then I would definitly say give the Hawaiin a try, I bet you'll like it and be stylin on the trail!

4 stars

Good recomendation ED


9:04 p.m. on August 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Shirt looks a little snug around the arms, there, Robert.

Correct size?  ... Or, have you been 'pumpin' iron' ?

                                                        ~r2~

11:33 p.m. on August 6, 2011 (EDT)
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azrhino said:

Today was the day for the Hawaiin shirt test...

A good unbiased review. Yea, it would feel sticky lacking a breeze, but then I feel sticky wearing anything in 95+ temps lacking a breeze.  I would not recommend it over cotton in such heat, however, as that condition seems to bring out the worst features of both fabrics.  On the other hand, Hawaiian over cotton is a good combo in the cooler temps, when a full on insulating base layer seems a little too warm.

Ed

11:39 p.m. on August 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanx for noticing r2! Shirt is correct size, maybe even a little big,  musta been stuck to me :)

No not pumpin iron, would you believe I been pumpin aluminum? I've been wanting to buy some iron but just aint had the cash. Been dumping all my money into gear lately so I've been pumpin aluminum load bars at work. Not doing much for bulking me up but its helping me get toned up and leened out.

10:40 a.m. on August 7, 2011 (EDT)
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a couple hours hiking this morning in the steamy mid-atlantic.  77 degrees when i started; dewpoint 75 degrees.  drenching.  happy to be outside, legs feeling great now that i'm back in air conditioning, but it was worse than the 100 degree days a few weeks back due to the jungle-like humidity.  lightweight wool shirt and underarmour (i changed mid-hike) equally ineffective.  

leaving the camelbak reservoir in the refrigerator all night was a winning move.  

11:57 a.m. on August 7, 2011 (EDT)
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leadbelly2550 sai.  

leaving the camelbak reservoir in the refrigerator all night was a winning move.  

 Smart / clever.

I opted for the mountain-bike early this AM.   NO mountains here; just 'urban exploration'.

Thinking 'bout a "hybrid-bike" for this sort of activity.   My road-bike (vintage Schwinn Paramount) is so light, and geared so high, that I do not get a work-out.  Plus, I'd probably get a speeding-ticket.

                                                  ~r2~

2:39 p.m. on August 7, 2011 (EDT)
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One thing I haven't seen mentioned in this thread is Seersucker (like a waffle texture) shirts. They are my favorite hot weather shirt because they are very comfortable (cotton / synthetic blend) wick moisture away and dry quickly without sticking to you at all.

I also like the Hawaiian shirts because they are comfortable, dry fast, and are affordable.

I have one Seersucker shirt printed in a Hawaiian pattern and I get a lot of looks, but it is super cool and is my favorite day hiking shirt for summer.

Cotton linen works well for me too, but it has been hard to find lately, and even harder to find at a good price.

I love the Columbia fishing shirts that have the vented backs, these work well in a breeze like you have when out on the water, but do not vent well with a backpack on.

2:51 p.m. on August 7, 2011 (EDT)
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Cool-Max.

                                           ~r2~

11:14 p.m. on August 7, 2011 (EDT)
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I freeze a Nalgene then place it up against the bladder in pack to keep it cool. After a couple hours the Nalgene is thawed enough to start drinking it.

Ive been wearing plan old Fruit of the Loom Cotton Tee's. Get em at Wally World for around $4

5:44 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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It was 83 degrees this morning at 5:30 am, it cooled down from yesterday to 103 this afternoon.  I ain't hardcore no more.  Gear check time.

5:58 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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I have been wearing Terramar Helix Crew shirts alot. They are full synthetic, breathe well, dry quick and cheap. Now on the flip-side they snag pretty easy, and after a bunch of cycles in the washing machine they show a bit of wear and tear but nothing to the point that they are not still great for my journeys in the back country. 

Terramar Helix($10)

http://www.campmor.com/terramar-men-s-helix-crew-shirt.shtml?source=CI&srccode=cii_65264419&cpncode=00-35300087-2

I have to say though for the money I really like MHs Wicked lite Ts. Very comfortable and wear well. 

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/mountain-hardwear/double-wicked-lite-short-sleeve-t/

E-OMC has a bunch of colors...

http://www.e-omc.com/catalog/products/8792/Mountain-Hardwear-Double-Wicked-Lite-SS-T-Mens.html?avad=397_e1eaa3d3

6:10 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Do you stink, Rick ?

Honestly, now ....

                                                        ~r2~

6:11 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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After a week on the trail? Definitely. I am at one with my...ummmm.....FUNK?

6:16 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Don't forget -- you and I may do some hiking, come Autumn.

Am I gonna have to deal with your FUNK ?

I'll volunteer for the upwind stints.

I understand putting charcoal briquettes under your arms and in your skivvies might mitigate the worst of it.

                                                   ~r2~

6:19 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

Don't forget -- you and I may do some hiking, come Autumn.

Am I gonna have to deal with your FUNK ?

I'll volunteer for the upwind stints.

I understand putting charcoal briquettes under your arms and in your skivvies might mitigate the worst of it.

                                                   ~r2~

 Lol, in all seriousness I keep it pretty well contained. All will be fine. If nothing else I typically wipe down with unscented baby wipes on my trips. 

6:25 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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I also understand that eating cabbage and bean burritos helps provide a natural bear-repellent.

Any truth in that, Rick ... or, should I be posing this question to your wife?

                                                      ~r2~

6:29 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Lol, I eat a garlic clove daily(seriously.) Hmmmm, maybe this has something to do with the wife keeping a safe distance from me at times...  I am a sauerkraut n kielbasa kinda guy....

6:35 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Whoooaaaa ....

This is going beyond the "funk factor".

Natural methane gases are volatile.   NO open flame permitted.

SHC   ("Spontaneous Human Combustion" ) may occur.

Won't be able to do any tent endorsements, that's for sure.

                                              ~r2~

6:38 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Ya know there are pros to this. Pack gets lighter due to no need to carry fuel. :) Also I carry a 40deg bag when temp dip into the negatives. If I ever need rescued no need for a Spot/Sat phone.... Just look for a mushroom cloud.

6:42 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Too HOT to hike ??

 

Ya think?????????

 

If you forced people to do this it would be called torture and be condemend under the rules of the Geneva convention.

 

It is said there is a fine line between pleasure and pain.  This is a perfect example of that statement.

Love gardening, but not in the heat.......... fishing yea, but not in the heat.......... hiking, but in the heat...........etc.  I love many things, but luckly I'm abe to find many other things to do to stay out of the heat while still enjoying life.

8:05 a.m. on August 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Amen brother!

8:41 a.m. on August 9, 2011 (EDT)
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x2   ... ( or, x3 ? ).

My attitude, as well.   Brian makes it all relevant.

Same as extreme cold.   Isn't enjoyable, sometimes.

                                               ~r2~

6:39 a.m. on August 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I've been holed up from hiking/backpacking all summer long because of the heat. Some friends and I had a backpacking trip planned in July, but as soon as the temps started pushing 100, I canceled it. We were even talking about hiking along a river to try and stay cool, but I nixed that because I told my buds we'd end up having to stop every two hours to fill up the doggone water bottles we'd have to drink so much.

I like Tipi's suggestion about hiking in the mornings and evenings and lazing around in the day. But even then you can only take so much. Down south here in Tennessee, we had plenty of days where it was still in the 80s during the morning and still miserable as hell. It's getting better the past few weeks with the mornings getting cooler, so you could do that approach. But I still wouldn't want to hike mid day.

I can take cold, can't take heat and humidity, which is what we get here in Tennessee. At least with cold, you can add layers. Heat, there are only so many clothes you can take off before you become a flasher.

8:24 a.m. on August 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Louisiana'a the same way brother, it looks like we're going to break the 1881 record for number of days over 100 this year.  I'm not cheering to break this record:(

9:17 a.m. on September 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Well ....

Just as we all have suspected ....

The stats are in.   The USA just endured its hottest Summer in 75 years, and the second hottest Summer on record ... (according to the Nat'l Climatic Data Center).

Only the Dust Bowl year of 1936 was warmer ... by  0.1 degree !

And, probably the only reason that mark wasn't eclipsed, was because two states --  Oregon and Washington had a cooler-than-average Summer.   So, that had to be factored-in, in figuring the contiguous 48 State average.

Four States -- Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Louisiana -- had their hottest Summer ever recorded.


Aaaaarrrrggghhhhhh .....

[ *insert double face-palm emoticon* ].

                                                          ~r2~

12:08 p.m. on September 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Yep, and now were getting our (PNW) mini  Heat wave up here. 85 deg. Now I know what yor all saying.   Baby, whaaa..whaaaa...whaaaaaaa.  But for me much above 85 with humidity and I sweat like a pig and start chafing.  The boots/socks get soggy and I can't keep the sweet from stinging my eyes. Heat rash, no thanks.   My answer is to ditch the hiking gear and jump on the bike (M/C) and go for a ride.  It's just way to hot for me.  How I gauge the "to hot for a hike" factor is I ask my dog (Mogh) what he thinks.  If it's to hot for him to peel himself of the cooler ground in the shade I listen to his wise wisdom.  For me a ride thru a mountian pass is just as nice/good as a hike down a mountian trail, just in a different way.  85 deg today.  I think I'll go for a ride.

12:43 p.m. on September 9, 2011 (EDT)
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85!  Where is my coat?  Actually, I couldn't stand it any longer.  Went to Arkansas last week end for a tune up 20 mile.  The temps. dropped to 96 during the day and cooled to a lovely 58 by morning.  Much better than the 106 from the front side of the week. Come on fall:)

1:25 p.m. on September 9, 2011 (EDT)
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With my winning in the above post I really do feel for you guys.  We Are about to set a record up here in WA for Sept for the most amount of days above 80 deg in a row in the month of Sept.  One of the very many reasons I moved up here was/is the temperate climate that we have here.  Never too hot, never too cold.  Jsut about right cept for the rainy season.  Can't have it all my way all the time I guess.

3:21 p.m. on September 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Apeman, I would venture to say that was a minor reason.  I was stationed at Ft. Lewis, near Tacoma, for about a year.  WA & OR have some of the best areas for anything outdoors.  Then if you could get bored with that, then head across the border into Canada for even more.  Tough to beat that part of the country.  Wait a minute.... I seem to remember most of the year as the rainy season;)

4:00 p.m. on September 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Guyz said:

  WA & OR have some of the best areas for anything outdoors.   ... Wait a minute.... I seem to remember most of the year as the rainy season;)

 

Must have been what inspired Gore-Tex ....

But, wait, Nigel !

Bill Gore lives just up the road from me, near Elkton, Maryland.  Gore R & D, as well as their main plant are there.    Rains a lot in the Spring, here in Maryland.

4:24 p.m. on September 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Gore R&D, I'll have to remember that.

4:31 p.m. on September 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Guyz said:

Apeman, I would venture to say that was a minor reason.  I was stationed at Ft. Lewis, near Tacoma, for about a year.  WA & OR have some of the best areas for anything outdoors.  Then if you could get bored with that, then head across the border into Canada for even more.  Tough to beat that part of the country.  Wait a minute.... I seem to remember most of the year as the rainy season;)

Actually it was one of the many reasons but it was major.  As I was leaving Colorado due to the cold I needed a place to move to that again was not too hot, not too cold.  We have two mountain rages that in alot of ways are quite different, The Cascades and the Olymipic ranges.  We have a temperate rain forest just up the road.  We have desert to the east and the Pacific ocean to the west.  We have Canada to the North and Oregon and California to the south.  There is Salmon fishing, shrimping, clams, ostyers, mussels just minutes from my house.  And to top it off I live on the Olympic Peninsula which probably has more open public lands with the least amount of people using them in the lower 48.  Now that is just a guess but I do know on any given day there is hiking/camping, backpacking within 30-45 min of my house where there will be no one else but me and my dog all day(s).  Yes, a great deal of the year it is the rainy season and that is a double edge sword.  While the entire country was in triple digets heat wise, it was raining here and in the 50-60 deg range, no complaints here.  It is the rain which helps me live in the manner I do so that I don't have to work.  Where is rains things can grow and prosper, I can raise my garden and sheep.  With that being said  we have only had 1 1/2 months of summer so far this year, and with their prediction a La Nina winter season we very well may have tons and tons of rain for a very, very long time (just like this past winter).

5:29 p.m. on September 10, 2011 (EDT)
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If I remember right, most of the rain came in mist to light rain.  If you were moving good, were well fed and hydrated, you could almost evaporate most of the moisture off you.  Of course this was before gore-tex & most of the new fabrics.  The temps let you work hard.... well I really did work hard when in my 20's.  I do miss the salmon and the fresh king crab from down at Pike's Market.

10:02 p.m. on September 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Some winters are like that.  This last year I believe was the rainest year on record, but I'm to tired ot look it up.  We were pounded day in and day out with rain, rain and more rain and no sun for what seemed like months.  It started last October and did not quite till the begining of August.  It did start to lessenen during June's end into July but still rained every day or three.  But much better than being pounded with all sun and no rain.

6:07 a.m. on September 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Hawaii is the rainiest State in the Union.

Followed by Louisiana and Mississippi.

Washington and Oregon do not make it into the top ten.

                                                     ~r2~

12:53 p.m. on September 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

Hawaii is the rainiest State in the Union.

Followed by Louisiana and Mississippi.

Washington and Oregon do not make it into the top ten.

                                                     ~r2~

 

Nope we do not get as much rain as some other areas................with that been said it began raining at begining of October last year and rained till the end of July this year.  It's not always the amount of rain but quite often the fact that it never seems to end.  10 months of solid cloud cover with just a few sun breaks can drive a person batty.  During the rainy season which is usaully 6-8 months everything is always wet outside nothing ever drys.  You can't hang clothing outside to dry, it just won't.  Winter is cold and wet.  Up where I am we get a little snow three or four times a winter season.  I'm up at 500 feet near the top of a hill.  Often it only snows  above 300 ft so that if you go down the hill it's raining, but up top it's snowing.  My living room is usually full of items drying off by the woodstove during the winter as there is now other way anything will dry with the humidity here in the winter/rain months.  Once the jet stream changes it's all over untill spring or summer the following year.  If you get a chance during the winter, notice where the jet stream hits land in America.  Always over the state of Washington give or take.  And with the jet stream in the winter comes the rain, much like a fire hose which won't shut off.

8:23 a.m. on September 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Yaaa, but you can put on rain gear and make it work with a little finesse.  105 just drains all motivation out of me.  Forecast today 101: tomorrow 102, but it did make it down to 61 this morning.  Morning is good:)

~r2~ said;

Hawaii is the rainiest State in the Union.

Followed by Louisiana and Mississippi.

Washington and Oregon do not make it into the top ten.

                                                     ~r2~

Louisiana might be on the average #2, but right now we are almost 20 inches of rain behind.  The ground is like flour in places.  We here in N. Louisiana have been in drought conditions for almost 3 years.  The lakes & ponds are really down or dry.  Hey Apeman, can you box up some of that wet weather and send it here for me?

4:40 p.m. on September 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Guyz said:

"Yaaa, but you can put on rain gear and make it work with a little finesse.  105 just drains all motivation out of me.  Forecast today 101: tomorrow 102, but it did make it down to 61 this morning.  Morning is good:)"

I agree 100%.  I'd rather have rain all day, every day............rather than the all day, every day heat your guys are dealing with.  It's 60 and cloudy today.  I'm ok with that.

5:22 p.m. on September 12, 2011 (EDT)
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I guess this thread will die with the heat.  They are both like the ever ready bunny: it just keeps going & going.

7:42 a.m. on November 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Residing in Phoenix summer time is simply a real drag! Sure its a dry warmth more often than not, however when its a dry 115 you are able to have the sun burning you, literally. Remaining in it for longer time takes a good hat, loose light colored cotton clothing that provides full dental coverage plans. Yes I stated the dreaded "C" word. Cotton soaks up your sweat then provides the evaporation to assist awesome you, kinda sorta. Shade is tricky to find within the deserts, if you discover a tree or rose bush large enough for shade its usually so small that when you manage or in it you've lost whatever breeze was coming.

Now its monsoon season and it is nolonger a dry warmth. Tho not the intense humidity all of you return east it has been running within the high 50-60% range but still striking 108-110 levels. (it is not the warmth index rating however the actual temp within the shade) Its totally miserable.

Final point here is I dont enter in the deserts this time around of the year, ITS TOO FRIK'N HOT! I actually do visit the local Mtn. Park to obtain my excersise, but Im out of there by 9:00am. However, you wont catch me even thinking about a extended trip.

I simply returned from the 3 excursion up around Flagstaff,AZ (trip report coming) 7000 ft elevation and lots of trees alllow for chilly temps and enjoyable summer time hiking. I'll go into the deserts again in December.

_______________________
happy.gif


11:53 a.m. on November 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey raming,

 Welcome to Trailspace! I see from your posts you are not new to the outdoors, and have been reading here a bit- we're glad to have you as a member :)

3:29 a.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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raming123wq

Hmmmm..... seems like Ive heard something similar before, just cant figure out where.

6:57 p.m. on November 6, 2011 (EST)
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45 - 63 and mostly cloudy,  need to get hiking to warm up

July 29, 2014
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