backpack

9:49 p.m. on March 18, 2012 (EDT)
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Iam doing mission work in Guatemala.I need a pack that can carry 75 lbs or more of tools[battery drills, hammers,and saws]when we go to remote churches.needs to be high volume and very durable.Been looking at military packs.All suggestions welcome. THANKS DON

11:09 p.m. on March 18, 2012 (EDT)
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What price point would you want to be at?  What general size (maybe 60-80L)?  I would look at http://www.mysteryranch.com/site/index.html - perhaps one of the G - series.  These packs are heavy, large, and can carry loads in that range well.  If loads will get higher than that, they have packs with NICE external frame that are rated to well over 100lbs.

FG-I had to fix the link, it wasn't working-TD

11:15 p.m. on March 18, 2012 (EDT)
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Hi Plumbdon and welcome to Trailspace,

 

Not knowing any more than you have given us,  here is a backpack you can't go wrong with if it fit's you,  at a screaming price. The Arcteryx Bora 80 Backpack and they only want $100.  Their will be a number of good quality backpacks with this being on of them.  Do you know your lumbar measurement?

 

http://burlington.craigslist.org/spo/2843928886.html

2:48 a.m. on March 19, 2012 (EDT)
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I would look at a big external frame pack or maybe something like the Bora 80. I used to own the Bora 80 and it is well made but heavy, which means it will last a long time and the fabric won't be easily damaged by odd shaped stuff like tools.

An external frame should be cooler to wear. If you are going to be in the jungle, the weather can be brutal unless you are in the mountains where it might be a bit cooler.

8:52 a.m. on March 19, 2012 (EDT)
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I THINK SOMEWHERE IN THE 100L RANGE.I HAVE A OSPREY ARGON85 NOW BUT THINGS SEEM A LITTLE TIGHT.I WAS FITTED FOR A MEDIUM AND SEEMS TO RIDE WELL.PLUS LOCAL CHURCH MEMBERS MEET US SOMETIMES AND CARRY EVERYTHING AND ANYTHING ABOVE A MEDIUM WOULD BE WAY TO LARGE.I WRAP THE TOOLS IN FOAM TO PROTECT THEM AND THE PACK SO THE SPACE I NEED IS INCREASED.I HAVE ABOUT 400 I CAN SPEND.I BID ON A BERGENS 2095 THOUGHT WOULD BE A GOOD FIT  BUT LOST.SOME OF THE USED MILITARY PACKS ARE NICE BUT DONT WANT TO TRAVEL WITH A OVIOUS MILITARY BACK.SOLID COLOR WOULD BE NICE.

11:39 a.m. on March 19, 2012 (EDT)
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TD - thanks for fixing the link.

 

$400 is going to get you into a similar pack as the Argon 85 and the Mystery Ranch will be more money, at least new.  I would agree that used would be your best bet.  Maybe a used Mystery Ranch / Dana Designs G6000 or G7000?

 

http://www.mysteryranch.com/recreation/expedition-packs/g6000-pack

 

(hopefully this link works)

12:48 p.m. on March 19, 2012 (EDT)
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BFM Camelbak

2:25 p.m. on March 19, 2012 (EDT)
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How about one of these? 


DSC05354.jpg

 


DSC05355.jpg


DSC05346.jpg


Both are McHales's.  The blue one on the left is newer and larger than the green one on the left.  The third picture will give you and idea of size as the one in the middle is a Dana Design Terrplane.  The blue pack can hold much more than i could find to stuff in it.  If you look at the bottom on the blue pack it's collapsing as it does not have enough stuff in it.  I would guess that the blue one is around the 100 L mark that you are looking for.  I'd like to get $350 for the blue one and $260 for the Green one.  I would be willing to give you a week after you got the pack to make sure it would be waht you wanted so that you could load it up and take it out on a hike or two.  As long as you pay the freight and I get it back in the same condition as it was sent to you I would refund your money (minus freight) if it was not the pack you wanted. 

I would guess the green pack to be in the 80-90 L range.

You can check out their packs on the below link.

A new pack made by McHale typically goes for  $800 for smaller packs and can get into the 2000-$3000 range depending on what frame, materials, and adaptations you wish to have in a pack.

 http://www.mchalepacks.com/

PM me if either of these are packs you might be interested in as I was thinking about putting these in the classifieds here on Trailspace.

2:55 p.m. on March 19, 2012 (EDT)
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A few expeditions I have gone on required totting odd shaped hard, bulky items to a base camp.  We found mounting something like milk crates onto a external pack frame to be the simplest way to carry items that may damage soft pack fabrics.  Additionally the design of plastic milk crates makes it easy to lash items to their sides.  Once in camp the crates are put to use as storage totes.  You can leave them behind after your mission, I am sure the locals can put them to their own use.

Another option expeditions resort to is using plastic pickle barrels.  There is even a barrel marketed that comes with a harness system to facilitate hauling it on one’s back.

Both of these options are much cheaper that most alternatives.

Ed

5:16 p.m. on March 19, 2012 (EDT)
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I AM INTERESTED IN THE BLUE ONE.I MEASURED OUT TO A MEDIUM PACK IS THIS PACK IN THAT SIZE RANGE

5:59 p.m. on March 19, 2012 (EDT)
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CHECKED THE BARRELS THINK THEY ARE TO SMALL.WHO MAKES A GOOD FRAME I COULD ATTACH A BOX TO THAT WOULD CARRY 80LBS AT LEAST SEMI COMPFORTLY

6:01 p.m. on March 19, 2012 (EDT)
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plumbdon said:

I AM INTERESTED IN THE BLUE ONE.I MEASURED OUT TO A MEDIUM PACK IS THIS PACK IN THAT SIZE RANGE

First thing I would do is figure out what your Lumbar measurment is.  I can try and find out what size this will fit by contacting Mchale's and see if they can give me any meausrments ot go by.  To determine your lumbar measurment, measure down the spine from the C7 vertebrae to a line horizontal with the iliac or hip crest.  The measurment that you take in between the C7 annd iliac crest is the number you ar looking for.  Here is a site that can help you do that if you need more direction. 

http://www.mchalepacks.com/packs/detail/measure.htm

8:37 p.m. on March 19, 2012 (EDT)
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Given that the OP wants to haul power tools and other odd-shaped, high density (hence very heavy) items, I agree with Ed (whome). I would recommend very strongly an external frame pack over an internal. Externals aren't "fashionable", but they work significantly better when it comes to huge, odd-shaped loads. As Ed points out, when carrying odd-shaped loads, the capability of lashing tool boxes and bags, as well as crates of materials to the external frame just plain makes better sense than stuffing the tools in an internal frame bag (think about shoving a saw into a pack). A couple weeks ago, I had to carry a load of hand tools and some battery power tools out to the far end of one of the Boy Scout camps I support as a volunteer, and chose to use my old Kelty frame (minus the bag) to lash my Husky tool bag and a milk crate with pry bars, saws, and a pickax. I suspect the OP is going to be carrying similar loads.

Talk to Dana Gleason at Mystery Ranch (the "Dana" of Dana Designs) about his load-hauler packs. He and I had a chuckle a couple years ago about how his designs of internal frame packs years ago eclipsed external frame packs, and now he is turning out more big hauler external frames than ever.

9:53 p.m. on March 19, 2012 (EDT)
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would like to thank everyone for their input.Have decided to go with a mysteryranch  Nice Load Sling then work on organizing a tool box.Again THANKS FOR YOUR PROMPT REPLIES   DONALD

11:01 a.m. on April 2, 2012 (EDT)
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There has been a tendency in recent years to forget about the external frame backpacks. Personally, I haven't owned one in over a decade.

They are seen as old-fashioned, and somehow less efficient than the sleeker internal frame packs, but for carrying loads of different shapes and weights, they still work very well.

One advantage to the internal frame packs is that the weight is less likely to swing around. I once had a guy with an old external frame pack get stuck coming down on a scramble because it was swinging from side to side, making him kind of tippy. I sent him back up, and we cinched everything down tightly until he got past the scramble and back onto a gentler trail.

But when you look at the old photos of Sherpas going up Everest, or the early explorers, you see an incredible variety of gear hanging off those frames. Pots and pans and axes and saws, tents and bags and bottles, literally everything under the sun!

Thanks for the reminder.

11:31 a.m. on April 2, 2012 (EDT)
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 In my quiver I have several; including a couple vintage Kelty's, a vintage Gerry's, and an amazing Lowe Alpine with a 'Zytel' frame, courtesy of a fellow Trailspace member.

Also; admit to owning a few internal-frame packs.   'High-end'y' ones.   They have their place.   Mostly, for scrambling, bushwackin', day-packing, commuter-biking.   I sold a Gregory internal-frame pack, after un-wisely purchasing it, based on "recommendations".   

The usual 'go-to' pack is an external-frame pack for ME.

They're not in vogue, any longer.    Who cares?

I live near (abt 1 mile) to a couple prominent  sailmakers, here near the Chesapeake.   Considering acquiring some CUBEN-fabric  'scraps' ( gratis ), and having a pack custom-made to my own specs, to hang on the Kelty frames.   G/F  is an expert sewer / seamstress, with high-end professional machine.   I also like Cordura fabrics.

"To each his own", I reckon ....

                               ~ r2 ~

August 29, 2014
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