A Hello from a new member

9:21 p.m. on May 15, 2012 (EDT)
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Hi

I'm from Australia and found this Trail space forum really interesting to find very helpful tips from all these inspiring members. Would like to say Hello to you all first. I'm a beginner for hiking and trekking and have done only few. Would like to get advise , useful tips and how to turn a hard trip in to a very enjoyable experience with all of your support and guidance , thanks

Cheers

Anoma

 

9:39 p.m. on May 15, 2012 (EDT)
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Hey trekkersdownunder, welcome to the wonderful world of Trailspace. Its great to have you around. 

11:48 p.m. on May 15, 2012 (EDT)
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thanks a lot Rick , looking for some tips and advises in trekking everest base camp , should I need to post my inquiry under " climbing " or something else

 

thanks

Anoma

12:08 a.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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We just had a member here that did the Everest BC trip(giftogab.) If ya want you can start a thread in the trip planning forum(see link below):

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/trip-planning/post.html

Fire away with all of your questions. I am sure that there are many members here that will be more than willing to help you out with any info they can.

There is a vast array of experience and knowledge here at Trailspace. The great thing about this community is how everyone is more than willing to help others out so I doubt you will have much trouble getting any of your questions answered. 

Once again welcome to the community. 

Happy hiking Anoma. 

12:15 a.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Giday and welcome, I am from the Goldie, er was.  I joined this site for information on all aspects of the out(back)doors and have enjoyed the many great threads. I hope you too find some learning here too, it would be hard not to.

6:02 a.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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thanks for all the responses from existing members , feel much releived :)

 

cheers

Anoma

 

7:34 a.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Welcome to Trailspace Anoma, glad to have you aboard.

8:48 a.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Anoma. I just got back from Everest Base Camp Trek. It was a life changing experience and the hardest thing I have ever done! You can read the blog I did along the way HERE. I am also happy to answer any questions that my experience might help you with. Headed out to work right now, but please post here and I will let you know what I can! Welcome! Here is my tent at BC. (Can't rotate it for some reason)


IMG_4684.jpg

9:23 a.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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gifto, I didn't realize how steep Everest base camp was until you posted that photo!  How did you deal with all that exposure???!!!  Sleeping must've been difficult.  You would surely have to be roped in all the time.   LOL

Howdy Anoma!

10:11 a.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Welcome to Trailspace! 

11:14 a.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Welcome to Trailspace. Great to have ya...

2:08 p.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Welcome to trailspace. Done much exploring down under?

Gift o Gab is that a special cliff hanging tent?

6:23 p.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Yeas, Rob...hardest thing was when I stepped out of the thend and had to grab that trekking pole to keep froom falling and hope it didn't come off...you know....like the RoadRunner/Wylie Coyote cartoons!

7:53 p.m. on May 19, 2012 (EDT)
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hi giftogab,

wow, this is amazing , you were actually able to set up your tent in base camp. I was looking for this, but read some reviews and news informations saying that normal trekkers are not allowed to set up tents at the base camp. we are going on November, if it allowed ,

do we need to get any permits

how long we can stay , i mean overnight or day camping only

heard November will be very cold up there , will it be a good idea to stay overnight in a tent if possible

what type of tent we need

looking at your link and will get back to you if there's any more to clarify, thanks again

 

cheers

A

7:54 p.m. on May 19, 2012 (EDT)
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thanks for all who welcomed me and passed me some ideas about my trekking , you all are amazing people , feel really welcomed :)

 

cheers

A

9:34 p.m. on May 19, 2012 (EDT)
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Welcome Anoma,

It is good to have some of our friends from Australia as members here!

Mike G.

11:18 p.m. on May 19, 2012 (EDT)
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trekkersdownunder said:

hi giftogab,

wow, this is amazing , you were actually able to set up your tent in base camp. I was looking for this, but read some reviews and news informations saying that normal trekkers are not allowed to set up tents at the base camp. we are going on November, if it allowed ,

do we need to get any permits

how long we can stay , i mean overnight or day camping only

heard November will be very cold up there , will it be a good idea to stay overnight in a tent if possible

what type of tent we need

looking at your link and will get back to you if there's any more to clarify, thanks again

 

cheers

A

 I went with Mountain Madness and they are one of the few groups that  is able to  have clients stay overnight in Base Camp. A vast majority of trekkers hike in from Gorek Shep, stand at the Bae Camp rock and turn back to Gorek Shep. There are permits needed.  Get this book or one like it if you do not intend to have a trekking company guide you. You said that you are not a experienced hiker, if memory serves. You will want to avail yourself of good information regarding trekking at high altitude. This trek is very rigerous. Starts at around 8k feet and ends at 17,500. There are things you will want to be keenly aware of where altitude sickness is concerned. SOOO glad to help any way I can.

11:27 p.m. on May 19, 2012 (EDT)
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trekkersdownunder

you should start a thread in Trip Planning for this trip.

If you do could you post that you have done so on this thread too.

Many thanks

7:22 p.m. on May 20, 2012 (EDT)
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hi

thanks for sharing the infomration of the book, sure i'll purchase it. Mean time do you know any source we can buy the permits of camping in EBC , other than the travel agencies. Can we buy that permit from the Sagarmatha national park permit office ,

thanks a lot

regards

A

 

 

1:15 a.m. on May 22, 2012 (EDT)
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Dear all

stated a thread in trip planning to trek EBC in Nov , pls follow the link http://www.trailspace.com/forums/trip-planning/topics/126988.html#127538,

your hints , advises , tips and links to your own personal journals are really appriciated .

just summarizing the cost that will be inccured during the trip , please add anything if i'm missed

  1. flight to Lukla / return
  2. guide as a whole package ( flight to Lukla / accomodation / meals )
  3. porter as a whole package - hiring from Lukla ( accomodation / meals )
  4. meals per day ( 3 + snacks )
  5. accomodation per day
  6. sagarmatha park entree fee
  7. EBC entry fee ( if applicable )
  8. battery charging fees ( phones / cameras )
  9. hot water
  10. bottled water ( if buying )
  11. visa to Nepal
  12. accomodation in Kathmandu
  13. map for trekking EBC
  14. sourniers / gifts
  15. tips for guides and porters ( do we need this as essential or if possible )
  16. extra in hand

 

best regards

Anoma

 

2:06 a.m. on May 22, 2012 (EDT)
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I don't mean to discourage your plans, although it will seem that way, but high altitude trekking is nothing to take lightly. I spent several weeks in hospital, twice, due to altitude related problems and I wasn't trekking, just living in the Andes. Fortunately both times, I was living in a city when it happened and I wasn't at 17K, just 12K.

So, my advice is get as fit as possible before you go and get a bit of altitude experience so see what you can handle. I would head over to NZ and do some of the higher tracks over there before going off on such a big trek.

4:05 p.m. on May 22, 2012 (EDT)
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everest.jpg

Here's a nice shot of the route up Everest. Photo by Ralf Dujmovits of the summit queue of climbers on the Nepal-side South Col route

The success rate for getting to Everest Base Camp is around 90% provided you take enough time to acclimatize. There's one British company that spends an extra few days at the Market, and they're closer to the 95% end of the scale.

7:42 p.m. on May 22, 2012 (EDT)
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Tom D said:

I don't mean to discourage your plans, although it will seem that way, but high altitude trekking is nothing to take lightly. I spent several weeks in hospital, twice, due to altitude related problems and I wasn't trekking, just living in the Andes. Fortunately both times, I was living in a city when it happened and I wasn't at 17K, just 12K.

So, my advice is get as fit as possible before you go and get a bit of altitude experience so see what you can handle. I would head over to NZ and do some of the higher tracks over there before going off on such a big trek.

 Hi Tom

Above advise is appriciated and i'm 100% agreeing with you. Never taken the trek seriously, but i'm so exited too. Planned to do some trekking training through out this 5 months to go. I'm from Australia and highest mountain summit is kosciuzko which is only 2228m high. Done the 21km loop on this in summer and now we are planning to do it in winter to get used to the coldness, walking with heavy back packs than we did last time and also climbing up the with cold weather conditions. But still this is not even closer to the height of Lukla :). NZ would be a great idea , will discuss with the team and plan ahead accordingly.

hiking for 5-6 hours per day is ok with us as we do hikes in normal grounds here, but my worry is the altitute and the weather and keeping everybody mortivated until the end.

so will think about each possible training we ca do to get closer to this experience before we go.

Mean time , hv you done this with a travel company or as an individual group or by yourself.

best regards

Anoma

 

7:47 p.m. on May 22, 2012 (EDT)
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peter1955 said:

everest.jpg

Here's a nice shot of the route up Everest. Photo by Ralf Dujmovits of the summit queue of climbers on the Nepal-side South Col route

The success rate for getting to Everest Base Camp is around 90% provided you take enough time to acclimatize. There's one British company that spends an extra few days at the Market, and they're closer to the 95% end of the scale.

 Dear Pete

thanks for sharing this amazing photo. regarding the trip through travel agents , what is the procedure if we get sick during the trek. Obvioulsy they can't wait with a whole group until we feel better, but what kind of arrnagements they do on behalf of us in order to make sure that we are alright at the end, I mean do they send us down with another porter or guide / any helicopter rescues straight away or do they allow us to wait for couple of days with thier personnel and let us climb again if we have time following our return flight back to country

thanks

A

11:12 p.m. on May 22, 2012 (EDT)
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Anoma, I was bicycle touring in NZ and tramping on some of the tracks on the South Island, including the Routeburn and the Milford. I also took an introductory climbing class at Mt. Cook and did the Hooker track a couple of times. That particular track was damaged  a few years ago by glacier melt, as I understand it.

Nothing in NZ is particularly high, Mt. Cook about 13K. When I lived in the Andes, my house was at 11.5K, the city center at 12.5K and the airport at 13.5K (feet, not meters).

Lonely Planet has a book on tramping in NZ-

http://shop.lonelyplanet.com/new-zealand/tramping-in-new-zealand-guide-6/

11:17 a.m. on May 23, 2012 (EDT)
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giftofgab might be the best one to answer that. According to her reports, she made it to Base Camp then flew out by helicopter air ambulance. What an adventure she had, though!

HAPD is pretty scary, and they watch for it quite carefully. The key to avoiding it seems to be taking enough time to acclimatize properly, but even that's no guarantee. There's a medication that helps, too, but I believe it has some nasty side effects.

5:39 p.m. on May 23, 2012 (EDT)
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Peter is right-there are no guarantees when it comes to HAPE (high altitude pulmonary edema) or HACE (high altitude cerebral edema). Surprisingly enough, fitness isn't always the best deterrent, nor is youth. Both times I was sick, I was under 20, but both times I was new in country (the second time after being in the States for a couple of months at near sea level and apparently my acclimatization had worn off).

Climbers used to use Diamox, but not sure how common that is. Another drug, believe it or not, is Viagra-which I think dilates the blood vessels and encourages blood flow.

The only cure for altitude sickness that I know of is to increase oxygen to your system by either going to a lower altitude or using oxygen from a bottle. If I remember right, I wound up wearing an oxygen mask and getting an IV of something both times, but this was a long time ago, so maybe treatment has progressed.

Again, I am not trying to scare you, but just a reminder, this can happen and if it does, you need to deal with it right away. Assuming that you will "just get better" by toughing it out is unlikely, speaking from personal experience.

10:03 p.m. on May 23, 2012 (EDT)
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I reiterate that this is no easy task and getting fit is not a factor in whether you will succumb to altitude or not so much as whether you will simply get too tired. HAPE or HACE hits very very fit people who have multiple 8M summits under their belts. Diamox is still used and every trekker in our group as well as any other group of organized trekkers I spoke with had it. Our pule on 02 saturations were monitored twice a day to be able to see if something obvious was spiking up. We were interviewed daily about headaches, coughs etc. That is why I strongly suggest that your admitted lack of experience prior to this, you go with a company and not simply put the trek together and get a guide on the fly over there. You need to be sure that IF something goes wrong, you will have support. Many people do not use these trekking companies, but reading some of their blogs is scary and just more testament to the novice needing to be tied in to those who really know what is going on.W hen things go bad, they go very bad up there. As Peter1955 said, I was airlifted from base camp. I had insurance so I didn't have to come up with $8,500.00 cash on the spot to get out of there. A week or so later,a guy was faced with that and he had it far worse than did I and the heli was rejecting him for lack of money. Since I was with a reputable known trekking company, they GUARANTEED THAT THE MONEY WOULD BE PAID and I was taken out on that promise. Then My insurance took over and paid once I got to Kathmandu.

There have been 11 deaths from base camp up this year. Two were at base camp -- one Sherpa with alcohol poisoning and one from a  stroke. While I was there a guy had a heart attack and died on Kala Patar. He was fit and 41. Do I sound like a bummer? I hope not. What I hope is that your excitement is heightened by the prospect of going and doing it in a way that 1)KEEPS YOU THE SAFEST 2) GETS YOU THE GREATEST CHANCE OF SUCCESS. Two of my hiking companions were from Australia. They used Mountain Madness with me and we saw first hand how well we were cared for.

3:24 a.m. on May 24, 2012 (EDT)
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One more thing to follow up on what Karen has said, so as not to mislead you. The two times I was hospitalized, I was a military dependent, so cost was not an issue even though I was in a local hospital run by Catholic nuns. Had things gotten to be more than they could handle, I have no doubt I would have been bundled up and flown to a military hospital in Panama, so to be clear, I was not on my own in some third world country; all I had to do was keep breathing and everything else was taken care of. In fact, the first time I was sick, we were staying in a hotel in the biggest city in the country. The second time, I was at home (same city) and our landlord, who was a doctor, lived next door. He's the one who came over and diagnosed me. I was a relatively short car ride away from help, not a helicopter ride, so my circumstances were far different from someone trekking.

6:44 a.m. on May 24, 2012 (EDT)
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Dear Tom  and Gifto,

noted what you are trying to say up there, yes its not discouraging us, but explaining how hard this is even for a well fit person. We are not well fit but average. So I get it when you are saying the advantages of having a travel agent through out our trek to look after us and speak on behalf of us in a strange place far away from home. Thanks for this advise . Will discuss with the team about this option and will get everything finalzed accordingly,

 

thanks and best regards

Anoma

 

2:18 p.m. on May 24, 2012 (EDT)
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Good Luck, Adoma. It realy is quite fun and despite being evacuated, I am NOT at all disappointed in having been there. I used Mountain Madness, but there are a good number of reputable companies. If you decide to go that route, I would be happy to help with what questions are good to get answered by them as far as what you can expect from them. This trek was really great. It provided a wonderul interaction with the culture of the area and the views are indescribably wonderful. I am still flooded with the wonderful images and memories of that month of my life and smile constantly as a result.

5:26 p.m. on May 25, 2012 (EDT)
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I'm not saying don't go either-big adventures take big planning, but are well worth the effort.

6:56 p.m. on May 25, 2012 (EDT)
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Tom D said:

I'm not saying don't go either-big adventures take big planning, but are well worth the effort.

 That is right. If you are in relatively good shape you have plenty of time to make this happen. We are here to help!

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