Day hiking backpacks.

6:34 p.m. on September 19, 2010 (EDT)
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I been looking at all the types of day packs and don't know which one will work best for me, I need your help. I would like to be able to carry 1/2 gallon of water, not all the time. I will also have the basic's and nothing else. I have a garmin GPS and it would be nice to have a place in the strap to carry. I would like it water proof, but don't mind covering the pack. I would like to keep the weight down to 15 to 20 pounds loaded. I'm not spending the night on the trail unless I have no other way to go. I look at Keen Newport DP which has a built in rain cover and would meet my needs for water, also mountainsmith Day or Tour fanny pack with shoulder straps. The Osprey 22 also but doesn't look as strong. I want the pack to last and not worry about it coming apart on the trail. Any input would be helpful. Thank You

9:22 p.m. on September 19, 2010 (EDT)
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Eddie Bauer's first ascent line has a great day pack called the Little Tahoma (i think that's the name). It is designed by a lot of great mountaineers, one in particular is Ed Viesturs. The guy has a great reputation for putting his name on stuff he knows is good. If he wouldn't trust his life with it, he wouldn't expect other people to either. It normally runs $80 or $90, but I got it for $30. They should still be on sale, even on the website.


I have put 50bs of dumb bells in it for training purposes and it was still quite comfortable, and it obviously was durable enough to hold that dead weight. It's got quite a few compartments, and can be tightened up and compacted down quite well.


Good luck!

10:42 p.m. on September 19, 2010 (EDT)
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For day hikes I use the Osprey Stratos 16 (actually the small size of the Stratos 18). I've got all different size packs, but this is the one I grab for a quick day out. It's under 2 lbs, and I can carry a total of two Nalgene 48oz bottles on the side, a 2L reservoir inside the pack, and an additional 3Lreservoir in the AirCore. The pack is small, but allows for the essentials (remember, this is for day hikes). It's not waterproof, but you could throw a fly over it. Most importantly, the AirCore provides ventilation while I'm on the trail and helps relieve the "sweaty back syndrome". Well, that's my $.02. Best of luck!

6:16 p.m. on September 20, 2010 (EDT)
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A daypack can be anything you want it to be. Unless I was snowshoeing, ski touring or backcountry skiing where I was carrying a bunch of stuff, I wouldn't bother with an expensive daypack. I use an inexpensive Cordura (or knockoff) teardrop shaped daypack that I have owned and used for about 20 years. It cost me nothing (got it on a job). You don't need a fancy daypack. Mine holds a jacket, couple of water bottles, some snacks and would hold more of the "ten essentials" if I thought I needed them.

I use my little pack for skiing at my local ski field, but I've also used about a 3K ci pack as a daypack in winter carrying survival gear, shovel, food, stove, etc.

7:01 p.m. on September 20, 2010 (EDT)
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I use a sling now with the 10 essentials and keep a 24oz bottle in it, I also use a military style belt with 16oz canteen. I could change to 32 oz canteen on the belt. Just want to keep it simple and enjoy hiking. The sling works good, but some padding would be nice. I have used this setup for a while, just would like to make it a little easier with just one item. I want to keep it simple, maybe use some army surplus items. Thanks everyone for your help. The main goal for me is to have fun, be safe and enjoy my hikes.

1:53 p.m. on September 21, 2010 (EDT)
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I've used gear made by both Keen and Osprey and I don't think you could go wrong with either.

8:38 p.m. on September 23, 2010 (EDT)
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Thanks You, I also am looking a camelPack MULE, But the Keen and Osprey I can load Gatorade on side pockets. I don't want to mix it the 3L bag. I plan to buy something in a few weeks, Price is important, value (don't want it to break), and all weather bag, I walk in the rain.

11:18 p.m. on September 23, 2010 (EDT)
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One daypack I adore is the Deuter Futura 32 and another I really like is the Arc'Terryx Bora 30. The only thing is that both are somewhat pricey if I remember correctly.

My husband has a saying though "you can't afford the cheap stuff". He's all about value too.

9:10 a.m. on September 24, 2010 (EDT)
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I agree, I check out the Deuter Futura 32 it looks good. I'll go to REI this weekend and try a few and see what will work for me. Thank You

10:57 a.m. on September 24, 2010 (EDT)
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The trap I fall into often enough is carrying more gear in a bigger backpack. As long as I have room for stuff, why am I not carrying it? Right?

Instead, though I've been off the trail for about a month with some health issues, lately I've been thinking that I want (need?) to simplify my setup. I don't yet know exactly what that will look like, but the goal is to reduce the energy spent on carrying "stuff" in favor of finding new places to see and enjoy.

Within the perspective of backpacks, that might mean I carry a simple Jansport book bag instead of my Camelbak Vantage 30 for a while. Who knows. Just as long as I can be safe with the lighter load.

12:48 p.m. on September 24, 2010 (EDT)
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My own preference in day packs is to keep it simple. Lots of packs have too many pockets, zippers, straps, buckles, mesh, webbing......... for my tastes. It's just a daypack afterall. Unless you have specific needs for specific features I'd go with something simple and well made. My current personal favorite is the Rivendell Moutain Works Mariposa. I got the orange version.

http://rivendellmountainworks.com/mariposa.html

6:36 p.m. on September 24, 2010 (EDT)
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I guess the bottom line is water and the 10 essentials´╗┐; I want 64 oz of water and little room to carry the above. I would like straps to tie my jacket and carry something if it rains. If it get cold I'll have a jacket on.


Thanks you everybody....

2:04 p.m. on September 27, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: REI & MountainSmith

I use either the REI Flash 30 for day hikes when I need extra room for raingear, and layers of clothing options.


I use the MountainSmith "Day" (& Strapettes-suspenders) for light weight, not much bulk storage needed.

12:53 a.m. on September 28, 2010 (EDT)
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I think I going to get Camelbak Mule or HAWG, I think the HAWG, but just want enough for 20 miles day hiking. I need to water for southern California, not many water holes, but also if I know of water I will not keep 100oz of water in the pack.

6:29 p.m. on September 28, 2010 (EDT)
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Not sure if this might be too much pack for your intended purpose but look here for my review of my long time day pack. A Kelty Blanca 2000.

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/kelty/blanca-2000/review/20732/

11:35 p.m. on September 28, 2010 (EDT)
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I'm not big on daypacks, although I have one that I keep loaded expressly for hunting. That being said, when I'm hunting, I'm not really hiking, although it does involve hiking-like activity.

For hiking, I like my Gregory G-pack.

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/gregory/g-pack/

They aren't made any more, more's the pity. But it gives you an idea of what I mean.

Yes, it takes discipline not to fall for the "I can carry more so I do carry more" line. I just don't. I know what I want on a day hike and that's what I take. I find that the G-pack loads better and carries better than any daypack I've ever had, and I've had quite a few. Most daypacks, honestly, are not much better than my old canvas Scout haversack, such as:

http://cgi.ebay.com/VINTAGE-BOY-SCOUT-HAVERSACK-BACKPACK-KNAPSACK-573-/260666925435

With the G-pack, I get a fully encircling, padded waistbelt, nicely padded shoulder straps, load lifters, the mandatory sternum strap, the unique Wraptor suspension system, a nice set of outside mesh pockets, etc. Even on short hikes, it is nice to have that stuff. It is not quite ultralight, but not bad either at 2 lbs 12 oz.

You could probably find something similar, if this fits your needs.

11:31 p.m. on September 29, 2010 (EDT)
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You might also consider an '07 Camelbak Rim Runner if you can find one; pretty much bullet-proof. I've bashed and thrashed mine but it remains untrashed.

The current model isn't as good in my view. External tie points are gone, the subdued colors are gone, yeah, looks like marketing ruined another one. Ah well, idiots are in sufficient supply everywhere I suppose.

In general I favor heavy fabrics for a daypack/rucksack because they get so much use/abuse. Pack weight just doesn't matter so uber-lite materials don't either. What matters is quality construction, appropriate capacity, fit, fabric abrasion resistance and high sheer values, and external pockets and tie points. Yeah, pretty much in that order I think.

Kelty also makes good stuff, though it is not high-tech by any means. But it is good stuff. Consider the Redwing which, though a bit large for a general purpose daypack, is a great example of what a useful pack should be.

Good luck.

Drake

8:42 a.m. on September 30, 2010 (EDT)
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I'm still going to get Camelbak Mule or HAWG, but I agree with you about the material. I feel I'll spend the extra money and buy military version of this product. I'm not a big person with colors, I don't know if they just make tan or green only versions of camelbak. I have been using messenger sling that is military and a china knock off military style belt and canteen. Last nigh the belt hook broke after 3 months of use, everyone is right, you get what you pay for. I do carry water in the sling bag also.

6:23 p.m. on September 30, 2010 (EDT)
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I have had great luck with a Deuter 32. It fits well; the ventilation is superb; and, it has a payload capacity that suits my many needs.

2:12 p.m. on October 3, 2010 (EDT)
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try the gregory z22 it is ventilated and very comfortable ive used it on 30 mile day hikes and it carryeis to perfect amount for a long day in the summer it doesnt have the space for lots of layers. in is very water proof i have been in torentail (oops not very good at spelling) down pour for several hours on mt. monadnock and my fleece stayed dry with out a rain cover it has a camelback pouch and mesh pockets on the side for water bottles

7:09 p.m. on October 3, 2010 (EDT)
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I went to REI, 2 of them because the stock was not the same at both stores. I ask to try 10, 15 and 20 pounds of weight on various types of pack. I like most of the ones everyone talks about, but after using mountainsmith tour and day packs I felt they meet my needs. I went for the tour because it fits my needs best and I'm able to carry 2L of water. I did get the shoulder straps with it and 2 1L bottles. I wanted to buy it from REI but the prices were to high, I found everything online. I don't know what trailspace rules are for other companies and I will not give the name out, until I know it's OK. I join there mailing list and got 12% discount. I got the pack, harness straps and 2 stainless steel bottles for 94.00 which includes shipping.

1:35 p.m. on October 4, 2010 (EDT)
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Mike,

Trailspace has no association with any company other than selling ad space. And the ad side of Trailspace is completely separated from the editorial side (the part you are reading now). Some of us who have been hanging around Trailspace since it began (and also on its predecessor website) tell it like it is, even if the company is a BIG NAME, and especially if it is a small company that makes stuff we like (we moan a lot when small companies are bought by big companies, too). I think most of us prefer to support small local shops when possible - these folks generally provide excellent personal service, and some of the big chains seem to hire a lot of people who have little real experience in the outdoors. The BIG NAME shops and internet shops can sell cheap because their overhead costs are a smaller percentage of their total cash flow than a small shop that gives personal service.

Please do give your opinions of the companies you deal with, good, bad, or indifferent. It helps everyone to know which companies are most useful to deal with. The only thing is to give an honest and fair assessment. And of course, if you have an association with the company, be upfront about that (we want to know about biases - I of course have no biases - and if you believe that, I have a bridge to sell you {8=>D).

If you had a good experience and got what you wanted, let us know. If you have a bad experience, do take a deep breath before posting a long tirade. Sometimes a bad experience is due to a clerk (or the customer) having a bad day. Sometimes it is a generally bad attitude on the part of the shop itself. Mail order and online stores are often problematic, though sometimes that's just the nature of the Web. You do have to be careful of counterfeits of real companies on the web - a SE Asian knockoff that looks at first glance like the real thing (on my New England road trip a couple weeks ago, I ran into someone complaining bitterly about his Black Diamond trekking poles - they looked like BD at first glance, but a closer examination showed some significant differences from a known pair another hiker had - they were not BD poles at all, but cheap copies -the poles had been ordered via a web search from a "bargain" on-line company). It's good to know about companies like that, and of course, it's good to know about companies that give good service and produce good gear.

2:47 p.m. on October 4, 2010 (EDT)
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I wanted to buy it from REI but the prices were to high, I found everything online. I don't know what trailspace rules are for other companies and I will not give the name out, until I know it's OK. I join there mailing list and got 12% discount. I got the pack, harness straps and 2 stainless steel bottles for 94.00 which includes shipping.

Hi Mike, in a thread like this about a gear purchase, you can mention where you actually purchased the pack and any feedback on that purchase.

We even have a thread in the Gear Selection Forum for Outdoor Store Recommendations.

We only ask that there are no commercial posts, affiliate links, paid links, advertising, etc.

And, as Bill says above, posters need to be honest about any personal, professional, or commercial interest they have in an outdoor company, its products, or its direct competitors.

As long as people are honest and upfront, they're usually in the clear.

Thanks for asking.

http://www.trailspace.com/about/community-rules.html

7:26 p.m. on October 4, 2010 (EDT)
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Thanks for the reply, I'll wait unit I get the items in my hand and check all aspects of the sale and products.

5:36 p.m. on October 11, 2010 (EDT)
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My own preference in day packs is to keep it simple. Lots of packs have too many pockets, zippers, straps, buckles, mesh, webbing......... for my tastes. It's just a daypack afterall. Unless you have specific needs for specific features I'd go with something simple and well made. My current personal favorite is the Rivendell Moutain Works Mariposa. I got the orange version.

http://rivendellmountainworks.com/mariposa.html

Wow. Never heard of these guys. Quality, durable soft-packs for under $200? Thanks for the tip!

5:54 p.m. on October 31, 2010 (EDT)
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I use a REI Venturi 30 pack and it works great for me.

 

Tom

5:59 p.m. on November 7, 2010 (EST)
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Although outdated, and way too large as a day pack, I love my Black Diamond Shadow. As mentioned it is huge at 55L, and lacks compartments but more than makes up for these deficiencies in being EXTREMELY comfortable and can carry my bladder.

I often get comments when I pull it out for a day hike, but the extra half pound or so is worth it for me to have such comfort and relentless durability.

I sometimes use an old Jansport bookbag I have had for many years as well, but only if I am carrying loads that do not necessitate a hip belt.

September 21, 2014
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