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Side sleeping and mummy bags.

10:11 a.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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Can you side sleep in a mummy bag?  I am nothing but a side sleeper and am not comfortable on my back. Never had a mummy bag because I've never been camping in cold weather. I've been thinking about one for backpacking because of weight and size.

12:34 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I can side sleep in my mummy bag, I think the key for me is to just roll over on my side, bag and all. That is, not to roll around inside the bag like I would with a big square sleeping bag, but to just let the bag share my sleeping position.

If I'm on my side, the bag is on its side too. If I'm on my back, the bag is too.

I can curl up on my side, lay flat on my back, stomach, etc.

It's like wearing a toddlers sleeper, but much more expensive.

2:56 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I have several types of bags ... various temp-ratings ... down, synth.   Only thing I DON"T have is a 'double' / 'tandem' bag (for two people).

I am not a large guy ... almost same size as Mike ('trouthunter').  Am a 'warm-sleeper', also.   Cold temps don't affect me much.

I tend to favor semi-retangular bags.   I go with one temp-range LOWER than forecast or expected low temperatures, as I compensate for the extra air-space inside the bag that the semi's have.

I can sleep in any position.  Can literally "sleep on a picket fence".    If I wish to side-sleep ... no problems.   If I wish to lie on my back all night ... no problems.

Always easy to put on a light merino wool layer of undergarments if temps are really going to drop.  Liners are always an option.   Can add 5-15 degrees (F) of warmth.

~r2~

2:58 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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The Mummy Bag may take a little getting used too.

I find that after testing the bag at home, yeah that's right sleeping in the bag on the foam/air/camp pad in the living room before going camping has been beneficial.

As TroutHunter said, in a Mummy bag, you and the bag are best turning together.

If you are not a back sleeper you may not want to buy a Big Agnes bag.

A note with the possible use of a pillow or material as a pillow.  Don't go too small.  I did this when changing from my Therm-A-Rest Compressible Pillow by buying a Cocoon Hyperlite and my head kept rolling off the pillow.  I then bought the slightly larger Cocoon UltraLight, perfect i.e. for me.

Good sleeping enables good thinking and great days ahead.

4:36 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I like my bag a little tighter than most people do. when I turn the bag turns with me.

6:29 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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mikemorrow said:

I like my bag a little tighter than most people do. when I turn the bag turns with me.

 

I like to have an "Exit Strategy".   Somehow, I have visions of becoming a "Bear Burrito" when using a mummy.

Of course, not much I could do about a bear, anyhow.   Would be nice to know I could try, though.

  ~r2~

7:20 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I dont worry to much about bears, though in bear country here. Food stuff is far away. Heck 99.9% of them want nothing to do with humans. And to tell you the truth I worry more about Mountain Lions. You will never hear (see)them coming till its to late.

8:23 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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Bears, especially Grizzlies are FAR more dangerous to humans than Cougars  and one often encounters bears when backpacking here in BC. However, although BC has by far the largest population of Cougars anywhere in their world distribution, one very seldom sees one except an old, sick one which may hunt near human habitation.

In all my time in the bush in BC, I have seen most of our wildlife, except a Fisher and a Cougar in the wild. I would not worry and never have about Cougars, but, I am very careful about bears.

For anyone concerned about either of these animals and a possible encounter of the unpleasant kind while sleeping, I would suggest using one of the light electric fences and keeping a spotless camp.

8:36 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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Dewey, Grizzlies are a differant story all together. I'm carefull but not worried about brown or black bears.  Keeping the camp very clean. I see them all the time. I have never seen a cougar. But have run across their tracks many times. It worries me that I havent seen them. I know that they are there. Bears are not near the hunters that Mnt lions are. The cat doesnt want to be seen. Plus the cat is more prone to stalk you while moving. One time I found myself pushing a cat. The paw print was still filling from a stream. He was right in front of me. I never saw him. I backed out the way I came. I fear the hunter cuz I'm no match.

But back to the subject of the post. :)

9:02 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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If you can afford it, get a mont bell super stretch. No problem sleeping in any position. lite too!

9:25 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I use an oversize Mummy. I tend to roll around alot when sleeping. Like r2 says, I compensate for heat loss with lower rating and a good base layer in the bag to slip into if Im getting chilly

9:33 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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mikemorrow said:

Dewey, Grizzlies are a differant story all together. I'm carefull but not worried about brown or black bears.  Keeping the camp very clean. I see them all the time. I have never seen a cougar. But have run across their tracks many times. It worries me that I havent seen them. I know that they are there. Bears are not near the hunters that Mnt lions are. The cat doesnt want to be seen. Plus the cat is more prone to stalk you while moving. One time I found myself pushing a cat. The paw print was still filling from a stream. He was right in front of me. I never saw him. I backed out the way I came. I fear the hunter cuz I'm no match.

But back to the subject of the post. :)

 

There have been about a half dozen humans killed by Cougars in BC since records of such mishaps have been compiled over a century ago. The fatalities due to both species of bears are far more numerous and there are also many injuries to humans by bears.

I always buy right zippered sleeping bags, contrary to what the "egspurts" in store like MEC who are city people tell me that a righthanded guy like me "should" use. I do this so I can quickly get to my gun if I need it and I have done this several times at night and probably will again.

So, I would not worry too much about Cougars, I have lived among them for many years and they have never been an issue. As to the "hunting" aspects, well,  that needs further definition to discuss it seriously and this may not be the place for that. I do think that choosing the side your zipper is on is an important aspect of buying a sleeping bag and that is what I wanted to deal with here.

1:22 a.m. on May 30, 2011 (EDT)
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It's amazing how a thread starts with side sleeping in a mummy bag and gets diverted to being eaten by bears and cougars.  Almost like that old game of telling a story to one person then they tell it to the next until it gets back to you and it's completely different. 

I live in Florida. We don't have enough panthers to worry about running into them. We do have a few black bears but I haven't heard about them being aggressive.  I think they have plenty to eat and don't have to put on huge amounts of fat to survive the winter here, making them less aggressive at getting human food. 

You are far more likely to have problems with raccoons, especially around campgrounds.  I have had them drag a LARGE Coleman cooler about 50 feet into scrub before ransacking it. When I was a kid my grandmother left a jar of grease out to cool and forgot to put it away for the night.  It was smeared all over the plastic table cloth the next morning.  

Anyway back to original theme. Thanks for the advice and knowledge.  I might get one and try it out at home. Take it back if I don't like it.

11:48 a.m. on May 31, 2011 (EDT)
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I just wanted to say hey! You're from Ocala, I am from Gainesville!

9:48 p.m. on May 31, 2011 (EDT)
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I echo the suggestion about Montbell superstretch sleeping bags. I've adapted so I can sleep on my back in a mummy, but I am always envious of people who own Montbell down bags because they can twist around onto their sides without it being an issue. I'd try to test this out before you spring for an expensive Montbell bag, so check the return policy of the online retailer you purchase it from. Campsaver and I believe Backcountry.com carry Montbell bags.

1:50 a.m. on June 3, 2011 (EDT)
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I've had an old Sierra Designs "Sandman" for years and I love it.   I think they've been discontinued, so if anything ever happens to it I'll weep like a baby.   It's a mummy bag, but the midsection has stretchy, "bungee" type material built into it so that the bag expands in all the right places.   I toss and turn constantly in my sleep, but in this bag I can do so without the bag tossing and turning with me.   The hood is also designed with a short zipper opposite of the full-length bag zipper so if you want you can be fully zipped into the bag, but still sleep with one or both arms sticking out the top.  I can even fit my folded arms under my head when sleeping on my belly without removing them from the hood.   It's a great bag.  

KD

3:07 p.m. on June 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Personally, I've never had trouble "side sleeping" in my mummy bag, like mikemorrow above said, the bag turns with you.  I generally sleep on my back though.

The problem I have with a mummy bag is that I normally sleep with my feet apart when laying on my back - impossible with a mummy bag.  But I adapt, it's not that big of a deal.

11:31 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Mummy bags do take some time to get used to, in my opinion.  But, like all things, you must adapt and get a sense for what is comfortable for you.  At first, the mummy bag feeling was odd.  But now, I have no issues rolling around at night and consistently turn on my side in a pretty tight LaFuma DownLight 800 with no trouble at all.  The bag turns with me, I'll pull the pillow under my head, pull my knees up closer to my belly, and I'm golden.  This works even in cold weather, as the bag and face opening needs to turn with you to keep any airways closed and drafts out.

6:56 a.m. on June 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I roll around at night too, but I've integrated bivy bags into my 3 season and winter sleep systems. I slip my pad and sleeping bag into them and it keeps them together (along with) me no matter where I wiggle to when I am asleep. The added weight is minor since I like sleeping under tarps or single skin shelters 4 season, and it adds another 5-10 degrees of warmth.

12:09 p.m. on June 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Unless it's cold out, like below 20 degrees or so, I seldom zip my sleeping bag. I put my feet into the footbag and use the bag like a quilt. Works great. And if it does get cold I zip it up and use the hood. I have a Mtn. Hdw. Phantom 15 that I use when it's wintery. It's a slim bag but that's no issue for me since being confined is no bother to me. Seems to me that the deal is that some folks don't mind the confinement and some do. If you do feel confined look at Big Agnes or some of the Marmot, or other brands, that offer extra-wide bags.

6:18 p.m. on June 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I have a Montbell Alpine Down Hugger. You couldn't ask for a lighter bag for the warmth.  But, and this is a big but, if you are at all claustrophobic this is not the mummy bag for you.  Because of the elastic, if you are a side sleeper it will roll with you and by the middle of the night you can feel a bit tangled up.  My husband gave up on his mummy bag and bought a down rectangle one and loves it and the extra room and yet he is still warm. There is no rule that you have to have a mummy bag, especially if you are not going to be out in below freezing temperatures. 

10:46 a.m. on June 17, 2011 (EDT)
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philipwerner said:

I roll around at night too, but I've integrated bivy bags into my 3 season and winter sleep systems. I slip my pad and sleeping bag into them and it keeps them together (along with) me no matter where I wiggle to when I am asleep. The added weight is minor since I like sleeping under tarps or single skin shelters 4 season, and it adds another 5-10 degrees of warmth.

 Hello, Philip ~~

I am configured with similar 3 and  4 season kit ...  (with bivy bag instead of tent).  

How do you manage the condensation in the Winter ?

_____________________

  ~r2~

4:21 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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I was wondering the same thing, and may have made a big mistake...I got a Big Agnes for an upcoming trek to Everest Base Camp. It has teh system where the pad is slipped into a sleve on the back of the bag....guesiing there is no rolling the bag with me....

4:54 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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giftogab said:

I was wondering the same thing, and may have made a big mistake...I got a Big Agnes for an upcoming trek to Everest Base Camp. It has teh system where the pad is slipped into a sleve on the back of the bag....guesiing there is no rolling the bag with me....

 Hey giftogab...Welcome! I wish I could do a better search for you but I only have my phone. Montbell's lowest temp bag is 0 degree's..You need a -10 or better. I move alot when I sleep so I am with you..Also remember the expedition pad that adds to your bag brings up the r factors of heat displacement.

6:11 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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denis daly said:

giftogab said:

I was wondering the same thing, and may have made a big mistake...I got a Big Agnes for an upcoming trek to Everest Base Camp. It has teh system where the pad is slipped into a sleve on the back of the bag....guesiing there is no rolling the bag with me....

 Hey giftogab...Welcome! I wish I could do a better search for you but I only have my phone. Montbell's lowest temp bag is 0 degree's..You need a -10 or better. I move alot when I sleep so I am with you..Also remember the expedition pad that adds to your bag brings up the r factors of heat displacement.

 Thank you Denis...the information I got from Mountain Madness, the company with whom I am going,  was that my bag needed to be rated at 0. I also got a liner so that reduced it to about -8. The pad is -5. So I am pretty confident that the ratings will be ok, just worried about the side sleep given the inserted pad. I just may be a numskull.

8:41 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Here's something else you can add to add warmth. This is a link to the reviews of it here on trailspace Thermo-Lite 2.0 Bivvy.

11:06 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Even if I try and lay on my back in my mummy, I always end up on my side. Usually twisted around so my face is buried somewhere in the hood. Not awesome when you wake up from a deep sleep, and have to use the potty. HA!

11:06 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Wow!!   I  am getting enthused  ( not "excited" like the NASCAR drivers say all the time) ....   We're actually discussing WARMTH ... and it is forecast to be 101F  here in Maryland tomorrow.

Truth-be-known, I was in my rented storage facility yesterday and today.   I like to rotate the stored sleeping bags ... hanging them in different positions every month-or-two.

I've got an old 650-fill down bag, that's rated at -15F.   Not light ... but, that sucker is WARM.

Also, rotated my old Moonstone bag.   Anyone remember them?  Whatever happened to that company?   This Moonstone bag is "bomber" ... not the lightest, either ... but, tough as nails, whatever (?)  the heck the outer material is.   I could drag that bag over gravel, and I doubt it would faze it.

Oh, well ....  

How many days until Autumn ?

_______________________________________________________________

                                                      ~r2~

11:44 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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My Big Agnes is Moon something or other and they told me they make them for another company. At least the Yak carries mine on the trek I bought it for. The Yak or the Sherpa.

OH...and it was 108 here today...cooling off from 111 the other day

12:21 a.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Well I was lucky today. We had lots of rain today holding the temp down. It'll make for a very humid day the next time it gets hot. giftogab has it easy it's DRY in Vegas drink plenty of water and where sunscreen. In Florida it's 90%+ humidity your sweat just won't evaporate. You can be out 5 minutes and you're drenched.

4:13 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Generaly speaking, Ocala, you are correct! But this past week we had TONS of storms coming in. Raining whilst 108 seers the heat into your skin like you are being branded.

4:39 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey Ocalaguy, in the summer I live in the part of Florida that is always 77 degrees with no humidity... My house, my car, work, the stores...

I did a hike over near Juniper Springs a few years ago at Hidden Lake, the humidity was so bad at night that I stripped down and laid out in the shallow part of the lake most of the night. No sleep, but more comfortable.  My mummy bag would have been dead weight that trip if I had brought it.

5:59 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Hafford I'm surprised you didn't need a transfusion or just get flown off by the mosquito air force.

Florida is definitely Fall, Winter and Spring hiking if you hang out in the AC.  I used to fly model airplanes.  Winter is called the "building season." In Florida it's the flying season. Summer is the building season. 

6:55 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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 Pshaw ....   In Maryland, the State Bird is the mosquito.

___________________

          ~r2~

7:42 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Our mosquitoes can whip your mosquitoes.

8:37 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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I would hope so.

However; let's not bring them here (to MD).   We all know what sometimes happens when an exotic species is imported to control or eradicate another ....

BTW -- Wondering (?) ... how the mosquitos discern the difference between alligators and old women in Florida.   The skin is the same.

________________________________________________________

                                                      ~r2~

8:48 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Smell. Both are strong just different.

12:46 a.m. on July 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Bottom line is one must get used to sleeping in a mummy bag. Being out is NOT like staying at home.

More often than not I awaken with the mummy hood over my face, and I have to figure out which way is up. 

But, the point of the whole discussion is that we are OUT THERE!  Find a good, warm bag that gives you the room you need so you don't freak while zipped in.

Yes, a good night's sleep is important, but, if you learn HOW to sleep in your bag, it doesn't really matter. I use an REI -5 bag with a Big Agnes sleep pad, and I sleep like the dead. In fact, on more than one occasion, I have gone to sleep after a tough day's hike and awakened 10 (yes TEN) hours later, much later than I intended to get my day started!

As someone suggested, "practice" sleeping at home, recognize that you are NOT in your bed, and remember, you are in the greatest place in the planet "out there" -- and you will find your sleeping bag isn't as important as it seems, as long as you are warm :)

Good Luck!

9:43 a.m. on July 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Re-read my earlier post (above, and back about 36 posts ... the 3rd post in this topic discussion).

Just to re-phrase:

Choose a semi-rectangular sleep-bag ... one temperature range rating LOWER than temps you expect.

You'll never have ANY problems regarding your sleeping positions and comfort.

It's like a "no-brainer".   End of discussion.

However; I just KNOW there will be more (discussion).

Oh, well ....

____________________________________________________________

                                            ~r2~

3:58 p.m. on July 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I already have the BA mummy. it seems roomy through the shoulders, even for me. I am not a petite person by any stretch. I am going down the scale numbers so feel confident that by March 2012 the room will be even greater. This is a once in a life time experience because I am generally...no pretty much EXCLUSIVELY (since getting back outside a year ago) a day hiker. The Everest trek will take me back to overnights.

6:38 p.m. on July 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I have a few bags, not sure all the brands but they are all tapered or Mummy bags, most of the difference is the rating.  My 0 degree bag is by far the warmest, nice and toasty, but I only use it in early spring or late fall.  I am not winter camping at this time. 

But the bigger problem I have with sleeping on my side is my hip goes to sleep!  Then I wake up and have to roll to the other side.  AUGG!  I use a self inflating pad, and it helps, but I am a big guy and it's just not enough.   Most of my bags stay flat as I move, I try to keep them that way.  I guess I never though about rolling the bag with me.  I would hate to end up with the zipper under me, OUCH!  I try to sleep on my back but I have to be dead dog tired for it to work.  :)

I would go with the trying it at home before you head out.  Give it a few nights and you will know if it will work or not.  

Wolfman

8:17 p.m. on July 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Wolfman

How thick is your pad? 

9:01 p.m. on July 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I worry about the pad too. Mine is a 1.5 inch and supposed to be self inflating but it isnt

11:08 p.m. on July 15, 2011 (EDT)
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giftogab

Watch steep and cheap (check out sacalerts.com) for Alps Mountaineering lightweight pads.  I have 2 of the long size. They are 2 inch and do self inflate. The double wide is actually 2 3 inchers that Velcro together.  Some manufacturers recommend storing them valves open.  Alps says to unroll them and inflate them with a few puffs the first time and leave them inflated for a while.

I think you said some pack animals are going to be carrying your gear. If you really want a nice pad go for Alps comfort series XXL.  It's 30" x 77" x 4" and weighs 9lbs 14oz.

3:38 p.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Well my current pad is about a inch thick, I have a different one that is about a inch and a half, probably a little less, but it is almost twice the weight.  I can't imagine a pad 2 or more inches thick!  Crimy, I bet their heavy! :)   But they do sound nice!  I am always careful to make sure rocks and sticks and the like are out from under the tent.  So that is usually not a issue.  I often sleep on the sand (Cost camping) but anyone that sleeps on sand will tell you is is not very soft! 

My pad works good, some times I let a little air out just so it dose not feel like I am sleeping on an air mattress, but I just think I am just to big or the mat is to thin. 

OK so I got the pads out of the garage to see what exactly I have. 

1) New main pad, Alps Mountaineering it's 21 x 66 about a 1 thick and says "Comfort series", it is green/gray on one side and black on the other.  It was in the bargain bin for about $25.00 bucks.  It seemed like a good deal.

EDIT:  So I checked the Alps web site, it should be the Comfort Air Pad Regular, maybe it gets longer as it fills?  I still don't think it is 1.5 inches thick.

2) Old main paid, Wenzel 1887, green.  26 x 70 x 1 1/2 inch. No other info on it.  It is OK, but the nylon is slippery and it's heavy.

3) Other Pads; Wenzel Blue, 20 x 67 x 1+. And a Insul Mat, Max Lite 1.0 Full, 20 x 72 x 1, tapered to match a mummy bag,  It is very light. 

Any Ideas?  or suggestions?  I would rather not buy a new pad but maybe that is my best option?

Wolfman

6:57 p.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Wolfman

Go to a outfitter or store (Gander Mountain has them out sometimes) and try one out. Try out a 2 inch or 3 inch.  Another option is a hammock. People who use them swear by them for a good nights sleep and of course no need for a pad.

11:35 p.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I will check out REI next time I am closer to one.  Not sure about "Gander Mountain".  The other place I sometimes shop is down in the Tacoma area, about a hours drive.  

As for a Hammock I am interested in one, but that would only work if I am by my self, normally I have the kids with me, well at least one, my oldest, a young lady of 13, has much more important thing to do then go camping!  :)  Oh well hopefully she will get back into it as she gets older. 

Thanks for all the info.

Wolfman

10:29 a.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I used to be able to sleep on my side in my mummy bag, but lately I feel too cramped in it. I don't know what it is, old age maybe? But anymore I feel to snug in my mummy bag. Been thinking of going back to a side zipper rectanglur bag. They are larger and bulkier, but I feel more comfortable in them. I used my old Boy Scout bag for 3 years when I started backpacking in the late 70s then bought my first mummy bag when I was in Alaska. My current one is a Golite Featherlight 20 degree 1.4 lb down bag. I have been using it for about 10 years.

11:52 a.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Any signs of "wear-and-tear" on that GoLite bag, Gary ?

I am always dubious ( I'm a "Dubious Brother" ) of those lightweight, 'wispy-thin' fabrics, when it comes to long-term durability.

                                             ~r2~

4:25 p.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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The fabric has worn fairly well, but it has a chest zipper only and the zipper has torn out a few times where the lower end meets the bag. I repaired it myself a few times and even had a gear repair shop do it for me and its still ripping out. I have lost a lot of the down.

Have thought of replacing it with a North Face Cats Meow polarguard bag. I had one of them for 12 years before this Golite and it worked quite well.

5:27 p.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I as well prefer a bag that is more of a tighter fit just because I have found them to move with me. I always use mummy bags.

A few years ago I used a looser fitting bag and halfway thru my sleep I somehow ended up with the bag spinnig 180 degrees on me and awoke to staring into the hood as opposed to out of it. Mind you I was laying on my back.  I was warm though. I also feel that this substantially cut down on condensation. :)

6:00 p.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I have come to dislike the spinning of my mummy bag. I don't know how many mornings I have woke to find it twisted around me like a barber pole stripe.  I often turn over at night when one side gets to warm and the other too cool. When I used a sleeping bag with side zipper I would sometimes just stick my feet into the bottom and lay the bag over me like a comforter.

I have been a desert hiker for the last 30 years since my first long trips into the Grand Canyon. But now am looking at sleeping out in the fall,winter and spring in colder places like I used to in Yosemite during the colder higher seasons.

10:39 p.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I experience the same barber-pole effect, Gary, almost whenever I use a mummy-style sleeping bag. Since getting a hood-less quilt, however, I no longer wake in the morning wrapped tightly, burrito-style...

2:52 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
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giftogab said:

I worry about the pad too. Mine is a 1.5 inch and supposed to be self inflating but it isnt

 giftogab have you thought of the Expedition downmat 7, 8, 9  they say the R rateing is 5.3 . I also know Tippi Waters use's one in Winter on the BMT. Tippi to me is the cream of the crop when it comes to winter backpacking. I would suggest PM him a message and ask details about those pads.Just a sugestion and would like your trekk to be as confertible as can be..My friends hiked the Himalays's last summer with friends self guided..One person in the group was a professional guide..

4:03 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Several other people mentioned Montbell UL SS bags.  I'll third or 4th their suggestions!  I'm a side sleeper and the bag has never bothered me, I roll over and the bag goes with me.  On warmer nights I sleep on the pad and drape the bag over me like a blanket.

1:59 p.m. on August 10, 2011 (EDT)
TRAILSPACE STAFF
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Nemo's first sleeping bags for 2013 will include Spoon Shaped bags, designed for side sleepers with room to move in the middle:

Nemo's first sleeping bags new shape for side-sleepers

5:38 p.m. on August 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Alicia your link didn't work but I found it.

www.trailspace.com/blog/2011/08/09/nemo-spoon-shaped-bags.html

I ended up with Alps Mountaineering Clearwater 20° wide bags for the wife and me.  Not a problem sleeping on my side at all.

10:50 p.m. on August 10, 2011 (EDT)
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I've thought many times about a Montbell bag and feel that I've researched them, I feel, very well (I have passed up many silly cheap deals on Montbell bags).  Here's my problem  (I'm not sure there actually is an answer to my problem).  I'm that guy (person) who you see in the vidioes that moves around all night and has a sleeping disorder,  I sleep in every known conceviable position moving from one position to the next all night long.  When your at home do you have a bed wrap that moves with you all night long?  No, your pad(the bed) stays in the same position all night long.  Your blankets(the sleeping bag) stays on the top of you (hopefully) all night long.  Evere wake up wraped up tangled in your blankets,  that is me in a mummy bag, period.  Mummies suck....... for me.  I have two things that do not work for me in the area of back packing that,  for me,   I have never found an answer to in all the years I've been doing this.  Boots, and sleeping bags.  Regarding sleeping bags warmth is not a problem.........add more down........make better baffels.  Try getting no sleep for two weeks in a row, every single night, without exception on the road.  I can't imagime trying to conquer a mountian or large expance of land without sleep.  Not all of use are able to find the answers that allow use to do the things we want.  That may be one of the things that disqualifies me from doing some of the things I like to do.  But Da## it, I will keep on trying.

12:23 a.m. on August 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Have you ever tried a wide mummy?  The one I got is essentially a tapered square bag with a hood.

12:53 a.m. on August 11, 2011 (EDT)
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@ ocalacomputerguy:  I'm assuming you mean that which is in between a full on mummy bag and a full on rectangular bag, the quintessential "simi-rectangular mummy bag".  I have not, however I just picked one up on Criagslist.  I can't wait to get my hands on it but I will have to wait till after Labor day.  If your thinking of something other than what I just said please let me know.  I really don't think  the simi- will work, but for a $40 marrmot bag I'm willing to give it a shot.

April 18, 2014
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