Knife sharpening

12:08 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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What is the best way to sharpen your different knifes, like a smal blad Victorinox to a bigg blade Gerber or SOG, and what is the best type of sharpener to use on the different knifes??

Thanks 

12:49 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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I don't mean to be snarky, but I bet if you search this site with the keyword "sharpen," you can save others the effort of reposting their advice.

Ed

12:53 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Lol Ed trying to make it easy on us. :) Are the blades serrated, fine, etc?

Welcome to Trailspace ehg3322.

 

1:27 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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All fine.

1:43 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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2:00 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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So i should buy a sherpening stone lilke that?? 

2:08 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Not necessarily. It all has a bit to do with how much effort you want to put into it as well as how much money one wants to spend on a sharpening system. The most effective wallet friendly way to sharpen a blade that isn't contankerous for me is a diamond hone. I purchase mine from Cabelas. All the different methods out there have their pros and cons. But in the end for the most part they all work. Some just require a more "attention to detail" aspect than others(blade angle, etc.)

http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/browse/camping-knives-tools-knife-sharpeners/_/N-1100734/Ns-CATEGORY_SEQ_104560380?WTz_l=SEO%3Bcat104740380

This is the model I have used with great results.

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Camping/Knives-Tools/Knife-Sharpeners%7C/pc/104795280/c/104740380/sc/104560380/GATCO8482-Diamond-Hone-System-Knife-Sharpener/732415.uts?destination=%2Fcatalog%2Fbrowse%2Fcamping-knives-tools-knife-sharpeners%2F_%2FN-1100734%2B4294771370%2FNe-4294771370%2FNs-CATEGORY_SEQ_104560380%3FWTz_l%3DSEO%253Bcat104740380%26WTz_st%3DGuidedNav%26WTz_stype%3DGNU&WTz_l=SEO%3Bcat104740380%3Bcat104560380

8:10 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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I use just a traditional set of 3 arkansas whetstones, 1 fine 1 med 1 coarse. Been serving me well for years and years. Then you have all of the different and sometimes gimicky commercially available sharpeners. It really comes down to personal preference.

11:46 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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My preferred quickie sharpen is the 2 white ceramic rods in a V.  Other than that I rarely need more than that.  I don't do much in the way of heavy duty cutting, although the live electrical wire I was stripping with my short blade did dull it in a couple of spots.

A bit of trivia. The ceramic rods were/are made by Coors brewing company.

1:57 a.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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For basic sharpening, a fine wet stone would be adequate -unless the the edge is extremely dull and "rolled", then you'd need to start with a medium grit and then move to a fine. I would avoid using those carbide or ceramic sharpening devices unless you don't really care too much about the knife. They often don't match the angle of the edge of your blade and remove too much steel (the carbide ones). However, if you don't mind wearing down the steel to an angle other than your factory edge, these devices can be great! I use a carbide sharpener on some of my utility knives and on one of my machetes. This being said, using a stone is a "honed" skill, so to speak. If you have never tried this, I would practice on a cheap knife first. Having been a butcher for many years in my past life, I have sharpened 100's of knives. I had peers who'd been around longer than I that still had trouble with it. Practice first before you scratch up a nice blade. Have fun with it. With all the easy sharpening devices out there, it seems to be a dying skill.

1:02 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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1:07 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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I had that Pocket Pal, they sell them at Wal-mart. I guess it will get ya by in a pinch but honestly I thought it was a piece of crap. I use to keep it on a biner attached to my pack but lost it awhile back. Never cared enough to replace it. It struggled to sharpen the Gerber I had at the time.

10:04 a.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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I've been thinking of buying a Lansky or a Gatco system because I really seem to suck at sharpening free hand with a whetstone.  Hand sharpening may be a dying skill, it's like anything else  - easy if you do it a lot and were taught well to begin with.

11:56 a.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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I remember back in the day my grandfather would sharpen some of his knives with a file. Then again he had a few knive that were made from files.... Honestly, they weren't bad knives. He swore by them and had alot of stories associated with them.

8:46 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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ehg3322 said:

So i should buy a sherpening stone ?? 

 Only if the Sherpas recommend you do so ....

___________________________________________________________

                                            ~r2~

10:30 a.m. on July 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Wet/Dry sandpaper on whatever book I am carrying... then the backside of my leather belt to finish it off.  I've tried plenty of stones and systems and this method works for me.  Take some practice, but the weight cannot be beat!

2:28 p.m. on July 15, 2011 (EDT)
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This may very well be an option. :)


sharpening-wheel.jpg

5:13 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

My preferred quickie sharpen is the 2 white ceramic rods in a V.  Other than that I rarely need more than that.  I don't do much in the way of heavy duty cutting, although the live electrical wire I was stripping with my short blade did dull it in a couple of spots.

A bit of trivia. The ceramic rods were/are made by Coors brewing company.

 

My first post!  I stumbled across this page looking for something else and liked what I saw!  Lot's of good information.

I've been using the Smith's 3-in-1 ceramic rod sharpener for several years.  http://www.rei.com/product/738633/smiths-3-in-1-sharpening-system

It is the easiest, fastest way I've found to keep my knives sharp.  I have one I keep in my kitchen, and one I keep with my hunting gear.  Love 'em!  I think Spyderco makes a similar, much more expensive set as well.

By the way, I'm not necessarily endorsing REI by posting that link.  It was just the first link I found that had a picture of the sharpener. 

5:48 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey JDubs, welcome to Trailspace.

10:30 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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depends on the blade.  most blades, i use a whetstone with some honing oil.  for the two knives i have with convex blades, both of which happen to be larger, thicker fixed steel blades rather than folding knives, i use a leather strop, mounted on a block of wood, with some mildly abrasive green stropping compound. 

when i started out, i used a knife sharpening guide - plastic, clamps the knife blade, and adjusts so you sharpen with a consistent angle every time.  it's a worthwhile accessory when starting out, because sharpening knives correctly isn't easy.  but it's easy to mess up a quality knife blade if you do it wrong. 

i'm not a fan of the quick knife sharpeners, the ceramic or carbide rods you can set in a "V."  too easy to screw up and mess up the edge, and the angle of the "V" is often wrong for the knife. 

10:59 p.m. on August 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Callahan said:

for at home before and after

https://lansky.com/

on the trail

http://www.rei.com/product/780741/smiths-pocket-pal-knife-sharpener

 One really important point is the angle, i.e. the angle at which you grind the new or sharpened edge.

Primarily the better the steel the finer the angle.  Also, the more precise and finer detail the cut the finer the angle.

Practice sharpening and you will find the right angle, which is often different from one blade to another.

August 29, 2014
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