The New MSR MicroRocket -- Trail Report #2

12:26 a.m. on January 4, 2012 (EST)
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It was a beautiful day in the Los Angeles area yesterday, so I decided to go on a hike. I journeyed up Angeles Crest Highway to the Waterman Mountain area.

The day was clear and the views were stupendous.
P1090177.JPG

Of course, I took a few stoves along. smile.png Indeed, one of my main objectives for this hike was to test the new MSR MicroRocket stove at a relatively high elevation (8038'/2450m).

So, won't you please join me for The New MSR MicroRocket -- Trail Report #2?

HJ

9:32 a.m. on January 4, 2012 (EST)
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A good read HJ.

Nice photos to boot!

Our coastal plain (South Carolina) is separated from the mountains by a relatively expansive piedmont region.

Thanks for the stove testing.

Mike G.

10:39 a.m. on January 4, 2012 (EST)
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Nice shots. Beautiful country there around L.A. How long of a drive was it to the trailhead?

So are you a stove collector too? And why does Titanium change color like that under water? I could understand it doing that with no water, but covered in water I would not think it would burn the metal like that?

I use a MSR Steel 1 qt cook pot on my PocketRocket stove, have since 2002 when I bought them both in Babbits Sporting Goods in Flagstaff. My cook pot has not ever changed color on the bottom, tho I have never melted snow in it either. Is that what happened to change the color of the metal, the snow melting was'nt fast enough to keep the pot bottom from burning? When I last winter camped in Yosemite in 1980 I found I had to have a little water in the pot to keep the snow from scorching and making the water taste burnt, no matter what I used it for. Burnt Tang tastes terrible!

2:49 p.m. on January 4, 2012 (EST)
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trouthunter said:

A good read HJ.

Nice photos to boot!

Our coastal plain (South Carolina) is separated from the mountains by a relatively expansive piedmont region.

Thanks for the stove testing.

Mike G.

 Hi, Mike,

Thanks.  Usually I "stick to business" on my stove posts, but it was such an exceptionally beautiful day that I just had to share.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

2:58 p.m. on January 4, 2012 (EST)
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GaryPalmer said:

 

Nice shots. Beautiful country there around L.A. How long of a drive was it to the trailhead?

Hi, Gary, thanks. There is some really beautiful stuff around here, although I must say that I love N. Arizona, particularly the N. Rim area of the Grand Canyon. Haven't been out there since I got married a few years ago, but I need to get back.

The drive to the trail head is something like an hour from La Canada, CA which is a main entry point into the San Gabriel Mountains.  La Canada is maybe 10 or 15 minutes from where I live, so the whole drive was an hour and 15 to an hour and a half for me.

 

So are you a stove collector too? And why does Titanium change color like that under water? I could understand it doing that with no water, but covered in water I would not think it would burn the metal like that?

Yes, I'm a bit of a collector.  Thank you again for your Svea 123R.  It's a good working stove.  If you look back in my blog a month or two, you'll see your Svea 123R along with and Edelweiss cook set featured on my Hike to Bear Creek.   :)

 

I use a MSR Steel 1 qt cook pot on my PocketRocket stove, have since 2002 when I bought them both in Babbits Sporting Goods in Flagstaff. My cook pot has not ever changed color on the bottom, tho I have never melted snow in it either. Is that what happened to change the color of the metal, the snow melting was'nt fast enough to keep the pot bottom from burning? When I last winter camped in Yosemite in 1980 I found I had to have a little water in the pot to keep the snow from scorching and making the water taste burnt, no matter what I used it for. Burnt Tang tastes terrible!

I don't know if I have enough background in materials science to fully answer your question, but Ti just discolors like that.  My Ti didn't burn, it just gets heat discoloration.  I've seen it in a lot of Ti pots, particularly thinner ones.  You do want to be careful as you say to put water in the bottom of a pot when melting snow.  It prevents any scorching, yes, but more importantly it protects the pot.  Especially with aluminum pots, warping and even melting is possible if you don't have a good "heat sink."  Water provides for good conduction which makes for more efficient snow melting, protects the pot, and prevents any scorching

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

11:14 a.m. on January 5, 2012 (EST)
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Yes I found this out during my first and last long winter camp in Yosemite's high Sierra in Jan to May 1980. I burnt or scorched my water a couple times before realizing I had to have a bit of water in the melt pan to keep it from doing so.

1:25 p.m. on January 16, 2012 (EST)
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can hardly wait to get one

8:53 p.m. on February 21, 2012 (EST)
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GaryPalmer said:

 

Yes I found this out during my first and last long winter camp in Yosemite's high Sierra in Jan to May 1980. I burnt or scorched my water a couple times before realizing I had to have a bit of water in the melt pan to keep it from doing so.

   

Water contacts the pot uniformly.  Snow only contacts the pot at certain points (depending on how hard the snow is and what shape the snow is configured in).  Water will conduct heat away from the metal of the pot, preventing warping or worse, melting.  Snow may actually vaporize, leaving not much contact at all.  I've warped both Ti and Al pots when melting snow.

HJ

Adventures in Stoving

 

1:55 p.m. on February 22, 2012 (EST)
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I change my previous comment of "I want one" to,

I compared and have gone with a LiteMax by Snow Peak.

5:10 p.m. on February 22, 2012 (EST)
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They're both nice stoves.  I think the pot stability is a little better on the MicroRocket, but the LiteMax is lighter (56g vs 75g).  Both the same price at REI last I checked ($60.00).  

HJ

Adventures in Stoving

2:40 p.m. on March 1, 2012 (EST)
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I thought the first review was great....this was just the cherry on top.  Very nice!  Thank you!

6:07 p.m. on March 1, 2012 (EST)
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lol.  Thanks.

HJ

Adventures In Stoving

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