How do you get cooked egg off your cookware ?

9:18 a.m. on April 3, 2012 (EDT)
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Always wondering (?) the best way to remove cooked egg (usually fried) from cookware.

I have taken to using the liquified "Egg-Beaters" (100% liquid egg whites -- fat free, cholesterol free).  

Generally, I hike and camp in cold or cool weather, so spoilage is not an issue, especially for 2 - 3 day jaunts into the backcountry.  I pour-out (from original carton)  a couple of servings into small Nalgene bottles.

I use an (uncoated) aluminum cookware set.   I put a few drops of olive oil into the pan, and rub / smear it around to coat the bottom of the pan, and up along the sides, before adding the liquified "Egg-Beaters".

Afterwards,  I try to find sand to use as an abrasive, and combine with a couple drops of 'Camp Suds' or Dr. Bronner's.

'Google-ing' this problem, even for at-home cooking, including micro-waving ... does NOT provide a 'magic-bullet' solution.   Immediate cold-water was mentioned a few times, to help soften and dislodge the mainly protein component of eggs.

Anyone here have a good solution or "Eureka Moment" ??

                               ~ r2 ~

                     perplexed in Maryland

11:24 a.m. on April 3, 2012 (EDT)
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Scrape off any large chunks or if you have the water soak then scrape. Next use a Scotch Brite Heavy Duty Scour pad. No soap at first. You have to be careful with the cheap versions.  If they feel like the Scotch Brite they're OK.  Don't bother with the non-scratch version.  Just won't work. 

11:32 a.m. on April 3, 2012 (EDT)
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I have been playing around with these and really like them so far:

https://lunatecgear.com/products/travel-gear/scrubr/

I even use it for the dishes at home. Holds up well.

I have also been hammering on their Trekr as well. Simple product and it works.

6:36 p.m. on April 3, 2012 (EDT)
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I use a handful of sand and gravel from a creek

6:50 p.m. on April 3, 2012 (EDT)
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Change cookware.  Go with the ceramic coated wares if you have a thing against teflon; they are nontoxic, and low stick.

Ed

7:11 p.m. on April 3, 2012 (EDT)
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Less heat.

Remember - practice avoidance, haha.

You didn't say what brand of cookware, I really find that the better stuff is higher quality metal and is superior in several ways the least of which is being more non-stick.

Failing that use a scrubber like the Scotch Bright as mentioned.

I will use sand on Stainless, but I have had sand scratch soft aluminum which leads to more sticking. That's my experience anyway.

Mike G.

7:25 p.m. on April 3, 2012 (EDT)
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FromSagetoSnow said:

I use a handful of sand and gravel from a creek

I have found sand a gravel to work the best.  Soak the offending item just after cooking and take care of other things around camp before cleaning, it helps to use warm water.  I have also found that one does not need to spend a bucket load of money on cook wear so that one can end up cleaning it with wet sand.  It's much easier to clean the $19.95 set of pots and pans with sand than your new expensive $129 titanum pots and pans. It seem's utterly silly to me to carry the extra weight and space of scrub pads.  If one has the proper soap the same cloth that one uses for bathing, it can be use to bath your pots and pans after it's sand exfoliation.  This of cource only works in areas where there is sand.  I have been back in areas where there is only soft dirt at the camp site and silt in the rivers and neither is conducive to scrubing.

7:44 p.m. on April 3, 2012 (EDT)
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I don't know I still cook my eggs on flat rocks with my bacon and toast....

7:54 p.m. on April 3, 2012 (EDT)
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GaryPalmer said:

 

I don't know I still cook my eggs on flat rocks with my bacon and toast....

 Yes Gary, that works very well! I used to build rock ovens sometimes too.

Unfortunately where I live now we do not have rocks, everything is plant material & moist soil for the most part.

9:04 p.m. on April 3, 2012 (EDT)
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apeman said:

..the same cloth that one uses for bathing.. ..can be use to bath your pots and pans...

Oh no, this is definitely a kitchen hygiene violation!  What's the point in filtering water when you are contaminating cooking and eating surfaces thusly?

Ed

9:33 p.m. on April 3, 2012 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

apeman said:

..the same cloth that one uses for bathing.. ..can be use to bath your pots and pans...

Oh no, this is definitely a kitchen hygiene violation!  What's the point in filtering water when you are contaminating cooking and eating surfaces thusly?

Ed

Only if one does not clean it by boiling it. I used to boil my sponges and scrubbies as they would start to stink and I'm sure grow all kinds of icky things. I've never been one to use water filters either as out west where we camped/packed water was plentiful and fast flowing. Almost all camp sites were by lots of water so boiling water over an open fire was never a problem as we would have a fire going from the start of camp till late in the evening and then again in the morning until we left. One would not want to use a dirty cloth to wash oneself with nor clean a dirty pot or utensil’s with a likewise dirty rag. Just as a bandana may be used for many things so my a wash rag if used if cleaned properly.

11:13 a.m. on April 4, 2012 (EDT)
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Non Stick

11:26 a.m. on April 4, 2012 (EDT)
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Trouthunter said: Unfortunately where I live now we do not have rocks, everything is plant material & moist soil for the most part

No rocks or stones in South Carolina? Really? I have never been anywhere theres no rocks before.

11:57 a.m. on April 4, 2012 (EDT)
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Sounds like you need to practice better cooking technique. Cooking eggs without sticking using an uncoated pan, regardless of the metal, can be done quite reliably with a little practice and finesse.

-heat the pan up to medium heat first (this is important!)

-add a small amount of oil and coat the entire surface

-leave just the thin coat for a few moments, letting it heat up.

-add more oil or butter just before the thin coating begins to burn on. 

-add eggs and carefully cook, either flipping or gently folding sections of the eggs. Avoid a messy scramble and getting eggs on the sides of the pan.

-remove pan from heat before anything burns.

If you are unable to avoid burnt on eggs, soaking for a few minutes in warm water should soften the mess. Scrape off as much as you can with your  spatula or spoon, then clean with any of the scrubby options listed above. Sandy soil works well on Ti and SS, but will damage aluminum.  

 

12:03 p.m. on April 4, 2012 (EDT)
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Lower your heat and the egg won't stick, burn, to the pan.

12:49 p.m. on April 4, 2012 (EDT)
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Gary said:

No rocks or stones in South Carolina? Really? I have never been anywhere theres no rocks before.

Come to Florida.  We have lots of small rocks here.  When you put a hand full together it's called sand.  Any smooth rock big enough to cook on in Florida is either imported, concrete or asphalt. 

1:24 p.m. on April 4, 2012 (EDT)
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I think Gonzan and MIke hit it right on the head.Your technique is off. try their advice and you wont have a problerm..I boil mine.

5:09 p.m. on April 4, 2012 (EDT)
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Ever fry an egg in its shell? Take the egg, poke a hole in one end, (keeps it from exploding)  then place in the coals, when its black on the outside its done. Looks like a boiled it when you peel off the shell.

8:15 p.m. on April 4, 2012 (EDT)
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GaryPalmer said:

Trouthunter said: Unfortunately where I live now we do not have rocks, everything is plant material & moist soil for the most part

No rocks or stones in South Carolina? Really? I have never been anywhere theres no rocks before.

 Yeah for real Gary.

At least that's pretty much the case along the Coastal Plain part of my state. Up the road a ways into the Piedmont there are rocks, and as you approach the Blue Ridge in the upper part of the state it is mountainous and very rocky.

People even pay to have rocks & boulders hauled to their houses for landscaping.

I have never coked an egg in the fire like that, I will have to try some time.

I do take eggs sometimes in cool weather, in warmer months I take fresh fruit.

11:38 a.m. on April 5, 2012 (EDT)
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 I rarely carry eggs. I rarely eat breakfast of more than instant fruit and cream oatmeal dry uncooked. Last time I cooked and egg in the coals or on a hot rock was in the 80s.

2:29 p.m. on April 5, 2012 (EDT)
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We gave up on eggs in pans. Boil them in a freezer Ziploc with your favorite brown and serve sausage, veggies or cheese. Makes for a perfect omelet with zero mess.

11:03 p.m. on April 5, 2012 (EDT)
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I find it difficult to imaging carrying eggs backpacking. However when I use them while car camping I usually just boil them. If I were to fry them I'd clean the pan using the scrubby side of the scrubby/sponge I carry for dish washing.

4:57 a.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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I was contemplating eggs (not chocolate ones) for our next trip. There is a shop (backpackinglight) selling some yellow plastic egg holders that hold only two, a bit like Coghlans. I like the idea of bacon and eggs, especially where there are no bears, in a campsite.

I don't think anything will get egg off that easily. The mini scrapers that are becoming available (MSR, GSI ?) might be your best bet.

Don't carry your dish sponge/scrubber in with your cookware, it will just be a little vector waiting to spoil your trip. Microwave it if you have to keep it for the next trip.

But now I have to get some sachets of Brown Sauce.

11:56 a.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Pathloser said:

..Don't carry your dish sponge/scrubber in with your cookware, it will just be a little vector waiting to spoil your trip. Microwave it if you have to keep it for the next trip...

Yea, not a good idea.  In any case bring a small bottle of bleach or the serilizer they use in bars to sanitize both dish wears and sponge as the final cleaning step.  Good way to nip the vector thing in the bud.

Ed

9:22 p.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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r2

reminds me of the story of the alaskan prospector that said his dishes were as clean as soap and water could get them. after eating supper with him he showed my friend his two dogs, "soap" and "water".

seems like a you could use a chesapeake retriever more than you realize. best to train them young before they can scratch your pots and pans. ha

11:18 p.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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You must be reading my mind, lazya4.

Getting "back-on-my-feet", following nasty divorce and several surgeries.    Took up living in an apartment, to see all this through.

A "Chessie" is at the top of my list ... soon as I get another place in the country.   Maybe, a pair.

I heard about a local breeder that is crossing Chesapeake Bay Retrievers with Poodles.

"Chessa-doodles" ???

Probably great dogs.

                                 ~ r2 ~ 

1:51 a.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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Take range feed chicken eggs. The Omegas and cholesterol issues are right.  Cover the eggs in mineral oil and they will hold up for quite a while. Then poach the eggs. Clean up will be much easier. Or just hard (or soft) boil them in the field. 

Or put a soft boiled egg in your oatmeal. Good protein with the carbs.

Eggs are great sources of omegas, fats, good cholesterol, with fairly low calories (about 90) per egg.

Good luck!

3:01 p.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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let the critters like it clean

8:36 p.m. on April 23, 2012 (EDT)
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This doesn't help you now, but it may in the future.  I started packing along the nonstick foil made by Reynolds Wrap.  I tear a few sheets and fold them up and pack them along with my mess kit.  It weighs practically nothing and when cooking I line the pan I'm using with the foil and press it down firmly.  It makes it really easy to cook the eggs and other things as well.  When I'm done I can fold up the foil for another use or toss it if it is no good afterwards.

8:38 p.m. on May 24, 2012 (EDT)
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I cut small sections of the plastic net used for produce.

The openings are big enough, the food particles do not adhere.

10:41 a.m. on May 25, 2012 (EDT)
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If you boil a ltlle water in the stuck on pan, then use a scraper,plastic or wood it will come right off. The heat will open the metal like it was when u you cooked. I clean the flat top grill in my food truck with ice, when hot. The most burned on food comes right off. Ice will warp pans but the boiling tech works well. My wife burned split pea soup in a very large very expensive stainless pot, completely covered the bottom. It took about a hr but I got it brand new looking scraping it while boiling water. I got the last bit with a scrubby as described above on the end of the old rice paddle I was scrapin with.

11:50 a.m. on May 25, 2012 (EDT)
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Poached ?

1:56 p.m. on May 25, 2012 (EDT)
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a few thoughts that all reflect prior comments here:

-#1 way to avoid this problem is to get a pot with a nonstick coating.  there are some really good and not terribly expensive anodized aluminum nonstick pots - even heat distribution, easy to clean.  i resisted this for a long time.  now, i have no idea why.  don't use sand and gravel on the nonstick....

-#2 way is to add a little vegetable oil before the eggs (or instant eggs - i sampled a number of types of packaged trail eggs for the review corps, there were some good choices).  adding pieces of cheese also introduces additional fat & tends to make scrambled eggs a little easier to clean. 

-#3 cook with lower heat and monitor the cooking more.  scorching tends to leave that hard-to-remove stuff. 

7:35 p.m. on May 26, 2012 (EDT)
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Try a bakepacker and cook the eggs in an unzipped ziploc in the steam. 

Egg beaters work very well this way, pour in, add salt and pepper, maybe some onion, cheese, and bell pepper for good measure.  Seal the bag and shake well until the eggs are frothy, then unzip and sit the bag on the bakepacker grid.  12-15 min later you have a fluffly omelet and no eggs to scrape from the frypan.

 

Switched to this method for eggs to eliminate the scrubbing.

7:13 a.m. on May 28, 2012 (EDT)
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Try deglazing the pan. After removing the cooked egg , while the pan is hot, add water and stir with a wooden spoon or stick scraping the bottom to remove the softened bits. This works well in my kitchen at home and I would think it would work in the field. Of course the French deglaze with wine but water works just fine.

I like the idea of putting the eggbeaters in a ziplock to cook in boiling water. I can think of a few easy ways of screwing things up so I am sure a little experimenting would be needed.

3:24 p.m. on July 4, 2012 (EDT)
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buy non stick cookware with good heat dissipation

3:30 p.m. on July 4, 2012 (EDT)
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bob,everybody knows sand is a good natural abrasive,but as you abrate unwanted material from a surface you create more surface for something to attach to(imagine a slide of sandpaper)friction.teflon a by-product of refrigerant production works amazingly well.

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