back country meals

6:29 p.m. on July 15, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

I am fairly new at backpacking and am wondering if MRE's are a viable choice to reduce cost of meals. Are they exceptionally heavy or bulky? The reason I ask is that I cannot afford the dehydrated stuff and I have noticed that the MRE's price to quantity ratio is very good. I have considered all the home "remedies" and would like feedback specifically on MRE's. Thanks in advance....Newbie

7:13 p.m. on July 15, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

MREs, like most store-bought freeze dried, are overpriced, and they are way over-packaged. Save some money, eat really well with the foods you like, cooked the way you like, and carry lightweight meals - in short, spend $40 or so and buy a dehydrator. If you want some tips on dehydrating, let me know and I'll email you my little write-up.

8:56 a.m. on July 16, 2001 (EDT)
30 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
Ever eat an MRE? Try one before you decide! Yuuuuk. n/m

n/m

12:41 p.m. on July 16, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Janet
You can cook outside

MRE's and Freeze dried meals are expensive and very overpackaged. IT is interesting to see how much of the garbage you pack out is empty packaging. A quick and easy fix for meals is simply to cook semi-real food (some go for all real, I'm not that creative). Liptons noodles and sauce make fine meals as does rice-a-roni. One package will feed one hungry backpacker. You can also make spaghetti very easily, bring some pasta and one of those packs of dried spaghetti sauce. You also bring two minute noodles, and rice. You can make a fine tuna casserole in the backcountry as well as many other things. Depending on how long your trip is you can bring fresh veggies or dehydrated veggies, same with meat. For meat, the precooked bacon is an amazing thing. you only have to heat it up for a minute or so and it is ready to eat, no refrigeration required for storage. Hard cheeses also keep well without refrigeration, as does Edam(the one wrapped in wax), and velveeta (cheese product stuff).

For lunch I do enjoy bread (or crackers) with cheese and jam. You can bring jam and peanut butter in squeeze tubes. Fresh fruits always go over well as well.

If you want some real food ideas you can also check out the NOLS cookbook. They make all their meals out of basic ingredients...saving on food cost and packaging. Their recipes are also quite tasty.

Half-step

11:43 a.m. on July 17, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Yumre! C-rat, and poptart.

Just scroll down on this page and look for some g(f)ood idea. This thread may be helpful:
Help with light weight compact food - Darryl 09:23:21 05/30/01 (8)

I love MRE, althrough I still love to get hold of the ham and egg in the good old C-ration. MRE are not inexpensive and it still weight a lot by most backpacker standard. If you can afford a few good MREs then you can afford a dehydrator (try Target, K-mart, Wal-mart,...).

I'll try dehydrating tuna (pack in water, not oil), beans and chickpeas (from a can). Just rinse it well under tap water before putting it on the dehydrator tray. You can also set your oven at the lowest setting and leave the door half open, you can dehydrate food this way, but it may take some playing around. Also, go to a good bookstore (or website) and browse on some backpacking cookbooks.

And yes... someone mentioned poptarts below. I use them as no-cooking emergency ration. But who to say you can't eat them at dinner?

Good luck and enjoy the out-of-doors ;-0

12:30 p.m. on July 17, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

rei forums

Oops, I forgot... go to the rei website, click "learn and share" and go the the "community forum". The "Backcountry kitchen" is bury under "Camping/hiking". Not much is going on there, but see what you get when you stir the pot. Good luck.

9:58 p.m. on July 18, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

An aquaitence of mine gave me a case of MRE's a little while ago. They're not terrible tasty, and they aren't overly light. At least not the main meals. The snacks and desserts(ie. pretzels, cakes, whatever..), however, are worth leaving at home. They are no lighter than anything that you could bring with you and they are designed to last YEARS. they are nothing resembling fresh. Lets face it, a bag of herr's pretzels is better if bought at wawa now, than if packed 2 years ago. as for the main course, it's convenient for a day or two, but i believe that beyond this your weight savings in stove and fuel is made up by heat pack. also,try one first. unless you're a big fan of dinty moore and chef boyardee you'll want to explore other options. As per my experience, the Mountain House, pre-packaged, dehydrated meals are incredible. you'd never guess that someone just added boiling water to this no-mess meal if you haven't watched it yourself.

11:25 p.m. on July 18, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Goto www.adventurefoods.com!!!

The only thng MRE's are good for besides the military(cause they MAKE you eat them) is desert backpacking. And that's pushing it. Adventure foods has everything and anything freeze dried, and if you go to the bulk foods section you can get individual foods in any almost any quantity you want, and that really cuts down on the cost. Try some stuff from them before you blow off FD as being too expensive.

6:41 a.m. on July 19, 2001 (EDT)
30 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
Agree with joe man on that! I love Mountain House...

Of course I also love TV dinners, frozen fish sticks and frozen fried chicken.

If you shop around on the web you can find Mountain House (2 serving packages) for about $5.00 ea. Don't need anything but a spoon to eat it with and something to boil water in to prepare dinner. Comes in a package that doubles as it's own "stove" and dinner bowl.

Don't get the chili-mac. It's cheap but it is really bad. It also seems to draw a crowd of racoons.

Tip: don't forget to remove the cardboard ring on the bottom and use it to seal the plastic!!!

12:51 p.m. on July 19, 2001 (EDT)
Re: Ever eat an MRE? Try one before you decide! Yuuuuk. n/m

Any soldier knows MRE stands for Meals Refused by Ethiopians.

6:39 p.m. on July 19, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

three lies for the price of one! n/m

 

7:17 a.m. on July 24, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: You can cook outside

I agree. Go with the semi-cooked stuff.
Our favorite (I can even get kids & Teenagers to it it)
Get the Knorr's Instant Chicken noodle soup
Better than most with real noodles. I thicken it with some instant Mashed potatoes. To get fancy use some jiffy mix to create chicken and dumplings. add a can of chicken for extra protein. I cook this dinner 3 nites in a row without complaints then go to the lipton rice or noodles.
Breakfast- Breakfast bars, oatmeal, grits, bagels.
lunch - More bagels, trailmix, snickers, peta bread with salami and hard cheese.

12:10 a.m. on July 28, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Quote:

MREs, like most store-bought freeze dried, are overpriced, and they are way over-packaged. Save some money, eat really well with the foods you like, cooked the way you like, and carry lightweight meals - in short, spend $40 or so and buy a dehydrator. If you want some tips on dehydrating, let me know and I'll email you my little write-up.

I just bought a convection oven tnat has a "dehydrating" setting. I appreciate any tips!

11:09 p.m. on July 30, 2001 (EDT)
37 reviewer rep
747 forum posts

Order take out food the night before and just reheat it over a fire.
Jim (:->)

4:42 p.m. on November 9, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Yumre! C-rat, and poptart.

Quote:


Just scroll down on this page and look for some g(f)ood idea. This thread may be helpful:
Help with light weight compact food - Darryl 09:23:21 05/30/01 (8)

I love MRE, althrough I still love to get hold of the ham and egg in the good old C-ration. MRE are not inexpensive and it still weight a lot by most backpacker standard. If you can afford a few good MREs then you can afford a dehydrator (try Target, K-mart, Wal-mart,...).

I'll try dehydrating tuna (pack in water, not oil), beans and chickpeas (from a can). Just rinse it well under tap water before putting it on the dehydrator tray. You can also set your oven at the lowest setting and leave the door half open, you can dehydrate food this way, but it may take some playing around. Also, go to a good bookstore (or website) and browse on some backpacking cookbooks.

And yes... someone mentioned poptarts below. I use them as no-cooking emergency ration. But who to say you can't eat them at dinner?

Good luck and enjoy the out-of-doors ;-0

Chris. Sgt (ret) Toronto scotish regiment RE: MRE
well, I find that the canadian rations (IMP) are alot more easy to carry, they are extremely tasty, but hard to find, unless of course you are in the canadian military. All that needs to be done is a little feild strip before you depart. Aswell, what is any trip without pop tarts.

Happy hunting

August 2, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Food! Newer: Low sodium soups for backpacking?
All forums: Older: Marmot Alpinist Lightweight Jacket Newer: Need a VERY lightweight HI-Quality Tent