Proper Fuel Line Replacement

5:47 p.m. on November 1, 2012 (EDT)
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I took the the plunge and bought one of the Chinese remote canister backpacking stove to try out now that homemade stoves are frowned upon in the Boy Scouts. Several people have brought up that the fuel line can be questionable. What type fuel line do you recommend so I can run the fuel can in "liquid mode" in cold weather with out taking the chance of polluting my stove. I'm finally back into hiking and camping after a 20 year break so you know how much everything has changed. Thank's in advance for your help...

7:45 p.m. on November 1, 2012 (EDT)
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recommend the windpro 2. made to run inverted fuel canisters. no fuel line problems. what kind of stove did you buy?

8:09 p.m. on November 1, 2012 (EDT)
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As Jester says, what have you got? Without knowing exactly what it is, there is no way to give you any useful advice. However, had you asked before buying, my advice would have been not to buy one of these knock-offs in the first place. Buying name brand goods like Nike shoes or an Apple computer is a different story, of course, but I've seen some pretty shoddy stuff, especially pirated designs come out of China and I would be leery of buying anything that might be dangerous, like a stove. 

This stove sounds like a copy of a Primus or maybe an MSR of some sort, but finding replacement parts for it that fit may be hard if not impossible. I would try it out, outside with a fire extinguisher handy, before trusting it on a trip. 

FYI, I'm not kidding here. I set an MSR XGK on fire in my kitchen when the pump leaked while I was testing it. Fortunately, I got the fire out right away without anything other than a bit of cosmetic damage to the pump. Lesson learned and yes, I know that was really, really stupid.

9:47 a.m. on November 2, 2012 (EDT)
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It is the BRS-11. It has a pre-heat loop for running inverted but like I said the hose is my worry. I have located "factory" replacement hoses, but  I also have access to a wide variety of "hose" types. I would definitely  test it at home numerous times before taking out in the field. It was more or less something to play with since the alcohol stoves have been but on the shelf by BSA. I also always carry a back up for all things important.

12:44 p.m. on November 2, 2012 (EDT)
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Bottom line has anybody made a replacement hose for a remote canister stove?

4:20 p.m. on November 2, 2012 (EDT)
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msr recommends the hoses be replaced by the factory, and I agree.

8:27 p.m. on November 2, 2012 (EDT)
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I would agree normally, but I think better materials can be purchased and assembled. I was just looking to see if anybody had used a particular fuel line material with good success or if anybody new what the industry standard was for remote fuel lines. I have a strong background in jet fueling systems for shock trauma Helicopters and military fighter jets and have access to a variety of hose material.

9:24 a.m. on November 3, 2012 (EDT)
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lanawodny0921, welcome to Trailspace.

Could you by any chance provide us with a few pics so we have an idea of what we are looking at?

9:46 a.m. on November 3, 2012 (EDT)
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image.jpg

12:09 p.m. on November 3, 2012 (EDT)
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Welcome to Trailspace lanadwodny0921!


I'm curious - why have alcohol stoves been "put on the shelf" by BSA?

2:00 p.m. on November 3, 2012 (EDT)
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Officially any stove that is not factory made and fuel type clearly labeled is not allowed. Alcohol fuel stoves meeting this criteria are still not recommended because the flame being difficult to see and ease of spill.

4:08 p.m. on November 4, 2012 (EST)
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looks like the fuel line may be dificult to replace, especially on the valve end. interesting stove, although looks a little heavy. I can understand BSA's concerns about alcohol stoves, dangerous for kids. sorry I can't be of more help...I'm not a jet mechanic...

4:15 p.m. on November 4, 2012 (EST)
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one thing you could try is getting a replacement msr windpro 2 fuel line assy, then it would just be a matter of changing the end where it goes into the stove. you would also be getting a field serviceable shutoff valve, better than the one on there now.

4:37 p.m. on November 4, 2012 (EST)
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That is definitely worth a try. Thanks..

3:10 a.m. on November 5, 2012 (EST)
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I've made a couple of alcohol stoves and they are a lot safer than a liquid fuel stove burning white gas all things considered-no pressure, less volatile fuel for two reasons. Granted the flame is harder to see, but speaking from personal experience, worth the tradeoff. Even canisters can be dangerous if not handled properly.

6:11 p.m. on November 5, 2012 (EST)
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when you come down to it, any stove is dangerous. they all have the potential for flareups/explosions...

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