cup and mugs

12:06 p.m. on September 11, 2013 (EDT)
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i have several cups and mugs amongst  the ones i like are the msr  mug with lid 375mil, the gsi mug with lid 475 mil.My latest one i have ,which i have just reviewed is the light my fire pack up cup it  is a folding cup 265 mil with a lid and it is only 39grams so i think that is it super light
IMG_20130904_103747381.jpgand the best thing about it is the msr mug mate ( coffee filter) is a perfect fit !.
IMG_20130904_105057691.jpgthe other picture is  it on my digital scales to confirm the weight!
IMG_20130904_103819356.jpg
ok !

6:07 p.m. on September 11, 2013 (EDT)
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I use my MSR cook pot with its collapsable handle as my camp cup. No need (to me) to carry an extra object of weight to drink from. 

I tend to make use of everything in my gear for more than one purpose, there by going as light as possible. My pack weight without water and food is about 9 lbs.

I have been backpacking for more than 40 years on my own and remember the awful weights we used to carry in Boy Scouts in the late 60s and early 70s.

6:08 p.m. on September 11, 2013 (EDT)
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I like my Snow Peak 600 mL titanium cup (< 3 oz.) paired with my lightweight Primus Butane stove (< 8 oz.) for ultralight backcountry trips.  It is a pretty light cooking system that just contains those two items and the butane canister of course.  I use the Snow Peak cup to cook, boil water and to drink out of. 

I prefer my jetboil system if weight and size are not a big deal.    

12:10 p.m. on September 12, 2013 (EDT)
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I slurp my coffee directly out of my MSR Titan kettle.  Burnt lips, soot and all!

12:21 p.m. on September 12, 2013 (EDT)
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Its a bit heavier, and impractical. But I still lug my REI Travel mug with the plastic carabiner handle. Keeps things warm for a couple of hours, and keeps the coffee tradition in sync, at home, on the trail, or wherever in the world I may be.

2:04 p.m. on September 13, 2013 (EDT)
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I have my thermos insulated mug with lid. not really lightweight, but I like it. I use it for everything, including oatmeal. its my bowl too.

2:42 p.m. on September 13, 2013 (EDT)
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Cups and mugs are super personalized outdoor gear...I love seeing and learning about all the different combinations people use...if I believed in psychology I would certainly advocate one of those silly correlation studies between X (the mug and cup you use) and personality traits (laid back + control-freak + authoritarian +etc).

At the moment one of my favorite combinations is pairing the TOAKS 450ml single-wall (always single-wall) mug with my Snowpeak 900ml pot. I use both with open fires and alcohol stoves...so I made cozies out of reflective bubble-wrap. The Toaks 450ml mug with cozy nest snuggly inside the 900ml pot...with room inside the 450ml mug to put my Blue Mini stove + Snowpeak Hot Lips (pot grabber) + windscreen + priming pan + matches + scrubby + soap + spoon. So far this combination has served me well...and the whole thing is very light and compact.

I use this combination because I frequently want to have warm drinks and food at the same time. Having both wrapped in bubble-wrap keeps my food and drinks warm longer...allows me to use both to eat and cook with (which you can't do with double-walled mugs) + allows me to handle the pot and mug while eating and drinking without the use of gloves + keeps the soot on both the pot and mug from spreading to other places.

Of course...I did find it necessary to remove the handles of both the pot and mug so the cozies would go on and off easier...but this wasn't a big deal as the cozy provides a way to hold the pot and mug. It should also be noted that...I don't use an in-the-bag rehydration method of cooking like Mountain House...I instead both cook and eat out of my pot (so far I found that cooking in the pot is the best method for ensuring food is cooked properly...hard rice is gross). If I did switch to an in-the-bag style of cooking I might be inclined to bring the pot only...though drinking coffeee out of a 900ml pot feels like it is swallowing my face.

11:02 a.m. on September 14, 2013 (EDT)
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GSI Cascadian mug. 400 ml/70 gms of cheap, flexible plastic for $2.40. I'll eat straight out of the pan, but I need a separate mug for my coffee!

I'm impressed with how much cooking gear you have, Joseph, but you've mentioned a few times how important a well-prepared meal is to you when you're out in the bush. 

My whole kit consists of a Trangia alcohol stove (which includes a bowl to cook in or eat out of), An Optimus Ti folding spork, and my trusty coffee mug. Pretty minimal, but it doesn't let me get very fancy with my cooking.

11:33 a.m. on September 14, 2013 (EDT)
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I like my little REI mug. I reviewed it earlier on. Nice to ahe a go to cup in a handy place in my pack for firing up a hot bev on the trail!

12:23 p.m. on September 14, 2013 (EDT)
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If my girlfriend knew as much as you Peter...I'd have some serious explaining to do!

I am actually super cheap...I make a lot of my gear when there is a lot of money to be saved (sleeping bags + shelters)...and I am always on the look for cheaper and simpler clothing alternatives (I've found some crazy finds at Wal-Mart and the Goodwill)...so I rationalize my obsession with stoves and cookware that way...I've even made a few alcohol stoves here and there.

The truth is...I cook in my everyday life (there's a lot of French in my family)...so backpacking and camping food is one of the subjects I am always interested in learning more about and experimenting with. Also...I have taken a lot of people out into the backcountry with me...folks who fear every sound...hate every bug...and generally don't like to sweat...and what I found is...if you feed them some terrific food they will weight it heavily in their overall evaluation of the experience.

So yes...I have gone a little nutty over all things "kitchen" in the outdoor world for the last 20 years...it is probably the one area I can honestly be called a gear-head...and yet I feel like I've only begun to scratch the surface! I am also not opposed to simple cooking...when solo backpacking my kit (the kit above) is stripped down about as much as I am willing to go at the moment...but I am playing around with foil-bag cooking to eliminate the need for cleaning dishes and to conserve fuel...but as of yet I find pure rehydration to produce either over-cooked or under-cooked food...which the French in me finds intolerable:-)

BTW...thanks again Peter for having me take another look at the Trangia stove...I think it is a great option...and with the right cookware should allow me to boil + bake + fry + saute + simmer with perfection!

3:28 p.m. on September 14, 2013 (EDT)
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Seth said:

I slurp my coffee directly out of my MSR Titan kettle.  Burnt lips, soot and all!

 Ouch!!!! Too macho for me. :-)

7:25 a.m. on September 15, 2013 (EDT)
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ditto to that !

8:28 a.m. on September 15, 2013 (EDT)
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jrenow said:

Also...I have taken a lot of people out into the backcountry with me...folks who fear every sound...hate every bug...and generally don't like to sweat...and what I found is...if you feed them some terrific food they will weight it heavily in their overall evaluation of the experience.

...but I am playing around with foil-bag cooking to eliminate the need for cleaning dishes and to conserve fuel...but as of yet I find pure rehydration to produce either over-cooked or under-cooked food...which the French in me finds intolerable:-)

 Totally agree with you about using food to reward beginners (and veterans) on the trail!!

I'm curious what things aren't rehydrating well for you.  Feel free to PM if you don't want to clutter up this thread. I'm a long way from perfecting the art but sharing info can always be useful.

Just to be on topic :)...  I have a GSI dualist for use with a partner that I strip down to just pot and one cup for solo trips.

3:15 p.m. on September 15, 2013 (EDT)
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Well...rice and pasta are the two things at the moment that I feel like I am torn between having either a loose texture or too stiff of a texture. Dehydrated pasta and instant rice...just make my stomach turn when they rehydrate all the way through...so I try to do an al dente thing...but al dente for dehydrated food has a different "chewy" quality that kind of sticks to the teeth more than traditionally al dente cooked foods.

Dehydrated shrimp is another enigma that I am perplexed by...as it seems to take forever to rehydrate...no matter how small of shrimp I use? You could probably add beans to the list of slightly problematic foods...though they do rehydrate well...they always break-down a lot...which really isn't too bad when I use them in soups or with ground beef for a taco/burrito filling...but has a little bit of a gag quality alone.

I have discovered that if you let rice and the shrimp rehydrate over-night they will become soft-enough...but I really dislike all the fuss...I much prefer to cook and eat my food all at once...not to disperse the meal and its preparation over several hours.

These are jus the tip of the ice-berg...and I fully understand that there are compromises that must be made on the trail...but I would like to continually challenge those compromises with new practices and gear so that my food along with every other part of my outdoor experience is always improving. Any advice you might have is completely welcome...but we can start a new thread if you feel like saying more than a few words.

9:17 p.m. on September 15, 2013 (EDT)
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I always prefer crunchy over chewy. The solution to the chewiness of instant rice is to eat it with Frito chips!

11:04 p.m. on September 15, 2013 (EDT)
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I LOVE Frito chips...they are such a perfect trail food...high calories...as good pulverized as they are whole...adds a little crunch to the ridiculously mushy texture of back-packing meals...I cannot wait to talk food with you this weekend Goose!

6:04 a.m. on September 16, 2013 (EDT)
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What are Frito chips

8:45 a.m. on September 16, 2013 (EDT)
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john261 said:

What are Frito chips

 A brand of corn chips.


You folks have a trip on your minds right now but we really should have a good food chat some time.  Dehydrating/rehydrating is more art than science and everyone learns as they go.

9:15 a.m. on September 16, 2013 (EDT)
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is it worth buying a dehydrator and bag sealer i mean it is a lot of expense

10:08 a.m. on September 16, 2013 (EDT)
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For me personally it is. I don't like a lot of freeze-dried meals...so dehydrating my own allows me to have control over the ingredients. Also...I have a small garden and prefer to dehydrate what I don't eat fresh or freeze...so buying a dehydrator wasn't an investment in camping...it just conveniently assisted in it.

I think I could make an economic argument for dehydrating even if I did not already own a dehydrator...but that is because I easily stay outdoors 30 nights a year...and will likely continue to do so in the future. The average Mountain House freeze-dried meal cost around 7.00 (give or take a dollar)....for a total of 210.00 a year...and that's just my dinners on a slow year! Even if you don't have access to free vegetables from your garden...canned and frozen foods dehydrate really well...and could have you recouping your intial investment in the first year if you bought a basic machine and spent as much time outdoors as myself.

There is the matter of labor...but dehydrating is something I do almost effortlessly (even more so if I had a timer on my dehydrator)...usually while I am watching television or youtube gear-reviews...but it can be done almost anytime I am going to be home for an extended period of time (and with a timer I can do basic stuff while I am at work or away). There are a lot of people on TS that have a lot more experience than myself when it comes to dehydrating...but I am sure that they will agree that once you do it a couple of times basic dehydrating is almost effortless.

I don't know that a vacuum sealer is completely necessary...unless you go commercial...or just want to be awesome! Goose introduced me to some heat sealing foil bags on Amazon that he suggested can be sealed with a simple household  iron (25 bags for 7.50 or .30 a piece). My guess is that if you're not using "leathers" and you pushed out as much air as you could before sealing the bag...that your dehydrated meals would last several months on a shelf in a closet (if not a lot longer)...and certainly a lot longer if you store them in the freezer (I store dehydrated food in my freezer up to a year frequently with no problems).

 

12:05 p.m. on September 16, 2013 (EDT)
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john261 said:

is it worth buying a dehydrator and bag sealer i mean it is a lot of expense

 What he said ;)

You don't really need a sealer.  Dehydrators aren't that expensive and are very useful. Even if you don't garden your grocer likely has great deals on produce when in season that you can take advantage of.  For trail food you can create meals you like knowing exactly what is in them and leaving out things  like a three day supply of sodium in each meal.

Since we keep taking this thread off topic I started a new one

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/camp-kitchen/topics/150418.html#150418

6:20 a.m. on September 17, 2013 (EDT)
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thanks for the information

10:56 p.m. on September 17, 2013 (EDT)
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John, if your really on a tight budget you can dehydrate anything under the sun in a regular oven or with a box fan. A dehydrator just puts a bit more finesse to it. I have used my oven many of times to dehydrate all kinds of things. Have also used the box fan method quite a few times as well.

8:09 p.m. on September 20, 2013 (EDT)
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I saw a guy a while back drinking out of a quart freezer bag with a straw.

Some of the MRE's (Meal ready to eat) have a plastic beverage bag & instant coffee that can be heated using the MRE heater. A very light alternative.

I prefer a separate mug / bottle than my cooking pot to drink from, but I carry it as part of a system with multiple uses.

7:48 a.m. on September 21, 2013 (EDT)
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i could if i wanted a cooling beverage ,use a survival straw in the nearest  creek (go really hardcore!:-)

6:57 a.m. on October 26, 2013 (EDT)
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Trailjester said:

I have my thermos insulated mug with lid. not really lightweight, but I like it. I use it for everything, including oatmeal. its my bowl too.

 +1 on the insulated mug.  Mine happens to be the REI clear plastic mug with measuring increments printed on the its side.  I too use the mugs (one for bevies one for grub) for everything, enjoying my hot items long after other's meals have chilled.

Ed

10:10 p.m. on October 26, 2013 (EDT)
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I use my 1 quart MSR cook pot as a cup,cook pot and storage container for my pocket rocket,lighter,scrub pad and spork. I do not carry a separate cup to drink from. If I use anything besides my cook pot I drink from my water bottles.

I carry as little as needed when I hike. My total gear weight is about 12 lbs, pack,sleeping bag,stove,cook pot(lighter,spork,scrubby), sleeping pad, empty water bottles (for these I use the thin plastic bottle water comes in at the store).

5:58 p.m. on November 19, 2013 (EST)
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I have a very lightweight stainless steel mug, silver it holds about 500ml of liquid (about 90gms) and a small plastic measuring cup for the freeze dried meals (30gms). I find this is all I need really.

September 15, 2014
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