Cleaning Titanium

7:42 p.m. on January 22, 2018 (EST)
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I know there's some guys here that are pretty good with their metallurgy and I need a little help.

Quick backstory- I took my sons out a couple weeks ago, just for a day hike, but I like to bring a little treat for them to keep it interesting, anyway they decided on hot chocolate. As I was warming up the milk the two year old decided to start to explore an icy hill... Had to run and get him before he tumbled and came back to some burnt milk.
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Now, I couldn't care less about it visually. But I just got back from a trip where my soup tasted like burnt charcoal milk. I've scrubbed it pretty hard and this seems to be the best I can get it...any ideas? I know titanium is a pretty hardy metal but I just don't wanna go wrecking a $50 pot throwing in random chemicals. I've seen some people recommend those stove cleaner products- seems to me like something I don't really want in a pot I'm cooking in.

9:08 p.m. on January 22, 2018 (EST)
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I havent used it on titanium yet but used to get the really bad burned stuff off my old stainless steel pit with Barkeepers Friend...the cookware cleaner not the newer stuff. I think it uses Oxalic acid rather than more harsh chemicals.

11:31 a.m. on January 24, 2018 (EST)
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I have some titanium.  A rod in my femur and a bolt through my hip from a mule wreck.   It needs no cleaning.

4:16 p.m. on January 24, 2018 (EST)
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I'd try boiling water in it for a while, Jake. Like on your stove at home, for at least a half-hour. I'd squirt a little lemon juice in the water, too.

Plus intermittent scraping with a steel thing.

9:35 p.m. on January 24, 2018 (EST)
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try soaking it overnight with vinegar.  then use either a scrubber with baking soda or an SOS pad.

8:16 a.m. on January 25, 2018 (EST)
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I have found an SOS pad (or three) usually takes care of it.   It may take a few rounds of scrubbing.

9:07 a.m. on January 25, 2018 (EST)
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Titanium is actually a fairly soft metal (which is why you don't normally see it used as a backpacking knife; there are a few exceptions). You can soak with vinegar as mentioned above and use some very fine 00 steel wool as if it were sand paper to physically wear away the scorched material. This would be better than chemicals (as you pointed out) and I'm sure there is enough material in the bottom of that pot that you stand zero risk of rubbing a hole in the bottom of your pot. Just rub enough to wear away the gunk.

If for any reason you are unhappy with the "finish" it leaves in the bottom of your pot, you can always go over that spot with a 400, then 600, then 1000 grit sandpaper to bring it back to a very, very smooth finish. The very fine 00 steel wool really shouldn't be so aggressive as to leave deep scratches, though.

11:33 a.m. on January 25, 2018 (EST)
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Go buy something called a "Magic Eraser." Walmart, Dollar General, Target. They are easy to find. 

Mr. Clean makes the brand name, but you can get generic ones at Walmart. 

It will clean it right up, and is gentler than steel wool. 

https://www.mrclean.com/en-us/shop-products/magic-erasers/magic-eraser-original

11:59 a.m. on January 25, 2018 (EST)
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To follow-up on Mr. Johnson's post above regarding sandpaper, use only sandpaper known as "wet-or-dry" so that you can use water as a lubricant to keep from cutting too far into the metal.  This method allows for better control (as well as a better finish) when using high-grit paper.  However, it takes a little longer to get the job done.

3:31 p.m. on January 25, 2018 (EST)
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I used a regular steel wool sudsy pad. I had never had a problem on my MSR stove, but last spring I accepted an invitation to go camping with a guy who owns a tear-drop RV. He had a two-burner propane stove on the back of his trailer. The propane stove was EXCESSIVELY hot. It burned the silicone vegetable holder and the bottom of my titanium pot. In other words, beware of too hot heat sources! My cocoa also burned every morning. Ugh! A steel wool, SOS-type pad used with hot water and patience has saved my pot.

5:06 p.m. on January 25, 2018 (EST)
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Add a bit of hot water just enough to cover the bottom and sprinkle powder dishwasher soap leave it soak. It will soften up the gunk and wipe clean. May take two attempts.

5:24 p.m. on January 25, 2018 (EST)
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Seriously, try the Magic Eraser first. It works. 

1:29 a.m. on January 26, 2018 (EST)
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Have you tried just deglazing it? That usually removes most things burned/stuck on the bottom of a pot if done properly. I treat titanium much like cast iron, and I have found that a little kosher or other coarse salt and a chain mail ringer takes care of the problem in about 30 seconds flat. Other than that, the soap impregnated steel wool stuff makes quick work of it too.

5:12 p.m. on January 26, 2018 (EST)
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I'm lazy; oven cleaner does all the work - spray, let set, wash off.  Worse case maybe requires a light scrub with a green kitchen scrubber pad.

Ed

12:55 p.m. on January 29, 2018 (EST)
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Great ideas. All of them! Choices,choices,choices !!!

7:50 p.m. on January 31, 2018 (EST)
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8:29 p.m. on January 31, 2018 (EST)
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For anyone wondering, I went with a combination of Vince and Ramblers advice. Boiling the water for ten or so mins and then scrubbing with some coarse salt seemed to do the job. There's still a tiny bit but it doesn't seem to affect the taste anymore. Thanks all!

8:47 p.m. on January 31, 2018 (EST)
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But, I'm guessing a dremal tool with a fine wire brush would work well after one soaks the burned area in a past made with baking soda and simple green.  For those stubborn burned on messes I would also mix in some bleach.................but do not leave the bleach solution on for an extended amount of time as bleach will eat it's way thru stainless steel.......................or............get a new cup.  I got mine for free.  There pretty darn cheap on Ebay.

February 21, 2018
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