Pie on a stove??

6:22 p.m. on November 18, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Ray

Any tips on pies on a regular camp stove? It's something I've always wanted to do, and MRE apples would, I think, make a good filling, but does anyone have any suggestions for a no-fuss crust, and a means to cook it on a white gas stove?

Thanks,

FC

6:43 a.m. on November 19, 2002 (EST)
30 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
Mountain Pies!

Delicious stuff. Can be done on a stove or open fire. One needs the tool for this though. Two slices of bread and canned pie filling. Blueberry and cherry are my favorites.

11:29 a.m. on November 19, 2002 (EST)
30 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
check out this site.............

http://www.chuckwagondiner.com/pieiron/

shows the "tool" I was speaking of - a pie iron and has loads of recipes.

11:58 a.m. on November 19, 2002 (EST)
TOP 10 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
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Pie irons and other baking aids

If your local EMS, REI, or other camping/outdoor/sporting goods shop doesn't have the pie irons, Campmor sells them for $14.99. The pie irons work best with campfires.

Another alternative that works well on backpacking stoves is the Backpackers Pantry Outback Oven, about $65. This has a thermometer so you can control the temperature. Obviously, it works better with a stove that has good simmer control.

I have simply used a regular aluminum pot, 2 liter or larger works better, with a small grate or something else to hold the pie tin (get the small, 1-person size disposable aluminum tins at the grocery store), and cover with the lid of the pot. This also works for baking biscuits, cakes, pizza, etc. You do have to watch it if you don't have a thermometer.

And of course, Coleman makes an oven for their 2 and 3-burner car camping stoves that works pretty much like your regular oven at home, about $35.

The problem with using a backpacking stove for baking is that it uses a LOT of fuel. Baking takes a very long time. But we actually did some baking on a couple of my Denali climbs at 14,000 ft (didn't want to use up the fuel at the 17k camp).

And finally, if you can have a campfire, or are horse-packing or canoeing, there is the regular dutch oven. The aluminum ovens are almost backpackable, although the cast iron ones are significantly better. Dutch oven cooking is a well-known art, with a number of excellent books available. I may be a bit biased, but as far as I am concerned, the only brand to get is Lodge. The Asian versions do not seem to be as good quality and do not cost much less than the Lodge. Also, Lodge is now pre-seasoning their ovens, which is very useful for the first-timer. And yes, we have used dutch ovens on winter campouts. We sometimes demonstrate dutch ovens on the Winter and Snow Camping course I direct, too. And no, you don't set the oven on the snow; you use one of the cook tables. If you are using a sled to haul your gear for a snow overnight, the weight of the dutch oven is not a problem. Yeah, Ed, I know, it never (well, hardly ever) snows in your neck of the woods.

12:00 p.m. on November 19, 2002 (EST)
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oops, left out one phrase

Quote:

I have simply used a regular aluminum pot, 2 liter or larger works better, with a small grate or something else to hold the pie tin (get the small, 1-person size disposable aluminum tins at the grocery store), and cover with the lid of the pot.

**** the grate is to hold the pie tin or other baking items off the bottom of the pot, so the bottom of the pie or biscuit or whatever doesn't get burned before the pie gets cooked

4:39 p.m. on November 25, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Great site, Ed!

This is a very good site with lots of tasty sounding ideas.

I'm certainly going to try a few of them this Thanksgiving weekend in camp. I'll give a report on how they turned out.

Quote:

http://www.chuckwagondiner.com/pieiron/

shows the "tool" I was speaking of - a pie iron and has loads of recipes.

8:46 a.m. on January 29, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Pie irons and other baking aids

Quote:

If your local EMS, REI, or other camping/outdoor/sporting goods shop doesn't have the pie irons, Campmor sells them for $14.99. The pie irons work best with campfires.

Another alternative that works well on backpacking stoves is the Backpackers Pantry Outback Oven, about $65. This has a thermometer so you can control the temperature. Obviously, it works better with a stove that has good simmer control.

I have simply used a regular aluminum pot, 2 liter or larger works better, with a small grate or something else to hold the pie tin (get the small, 1-person size disposable aluminum tins at the grocery store), and cover with the lid of the pot. This also works for baking biscuits, cakes, pizza, etc. You do have to watch it if you don't have a thermometer.

And of course, Coleman makes an oven for their 2 and 3-burner car camping stoves that works pretty much like your regular oven at home, about $35.

The problem with using a backpacking stove for baking is that it uses a LOT of fuel. Baking takes a very long time. But we actually did some baking on a couple of my Denali climbs at 14,000 ft (didn't want to use up the fuel at the 17k camp).

And finally, if you can have a campfire, or are horse-packing or canoeing, there is the regular dutch oven. The aluminum ovens are almost backpackable, although the cast iron ones are significantly better. Dutch oven cooking is a well-known art, with a number of excellent books available. I may be a bit biased, but as far as I am concerned, the only brand to get is Lodge. The Asian versions do not seem to be as good quality and do not cost much less than the Lodge. Also, Lodge is now pre-seasoning their ovens, which is very useful for the first-timer. And yes, we have used dutch ovens on winter campouts. We sometimes demonstrate dutch ovens on the Winter and Snow Camping course I direct, too. And no, you don't set the oven on the snow; you use one of the cook tables. If you are using a sled to haul your gear for a snow overnight, the weight of the dutch oven is not a problem. Yeah, Ed, I know, it never (well, hardly ever) snows in your neck of the woods.


Anyone looking for good quality pie irons and all sorts of other campfire cooking gear should head on over to see us at The Original Fire Pie Company. We have a wide selection of Rome pie irons, grills, forks and lots of camping gear, too. Check us out at www.firepies.com and remember, US Domestic shipping is included in all our prices....what you see is what you pay! We'll look forward to seeing you.

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