Awesome breakfast suggestions??

8:13 p.m. on July 19, 2003 (EDT)
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So I am taking a sort of fluffy rich girl friend on her second backpacking trip and we're doing the roast rabbit thing with wine, baby carrots, and potatoes for dinner. (I am packing in ten pounds of redwood sticks to cook on)Peaches and cherries and trail mix for hiking.
I was looking at Ed's Yankee grits recipe and wondering if it could be made up in advance and some fresh bacon put on it for a gourmet breakfast, but I have my doubts. I told her that I'd do bacon and eggs with pancakes and maple syrup.

So the question is - Do you guys have any ideas about what I can make to impress her with a really Awesome breakfast? I mean in your wildest food dreams? We're hiking in downhill so we can carry a lot of weight coming in - but no cast iron skillet - just Titanium. We'll cook on a double burner coleman Xpedition stove. - only the ingredients have to survive an 85 degree afternoon in a pack - maybe next to a frozen rabbit, and then being stored in a cold lake in a baggy overnight.
Thanks
Jim S (:->)

11:07 p.m. on July 20, 2003 (EDT)
3 reviewer rep
60 forum posts
Southwest huevos quesadilla?

A breakfast I've done over a backpacking stove many times. need per person-
1 tortilla (for best results, get them the same diameter or slightly smaller than the diameter of the pan)
1 egg
chopped green chile
Monterey Jack cheese (thick sliced)
Picante sauce
clarified butter
salt/ pepper
First, put in a small amount of butter in the pan and heat it up till it pops when you flick water on it. While heating, cut cheese slices so that they will cover one half of the tortilla, around the edge.
In quick succession- put tortilla in pan (hang a part of it over the pan edge so it can be grabbed and folded over later), line 1/2 edge in the pan with cheese, crack egg into middle of tortilla, sprinkle with chile, salt, pepper, and fold tortilla in half (bring the edge without the cheese over on top of the one w/ cheese- the cheese needs to be thick enough to act as a retainer to keep the egg inside)
Cook one one side till cheese and leaked egg have formed a good seal along the open edge, then flip. Cook till puffy/steaming and outside of tortilla is crisp. Server w/ picante on top.
If weight is an issue, this will work just fine w/ dehydrated chile, picante and powdered eggs.
You can add other stuff (bacon, tomatoes, mushrooms, etc...) instead of chile for a different flavor.

Or, if you go for the pancake route, make them original by doing smiley faces or other designs (I make hearts for my wife...) by pouring the design first (say, two small dots for eyes and a long curve for a mouth), let it cook for a few seconds, then pour the rest of the batter over and around it to completely cover the design. Since it cooked longer, the design will be darker than the rest of the pancake.


Quote:

So I am taking a sort of fluffy rich girl friend on her second backpacking trip and we're doing the roast rabbit thing with wine, baby carrots, and potatoes for dinner. (I am packing in ten pounds of redwood sticks to cook on)Peaches and cherries and trail mix for hiking.
I was looking at Ed's Yankee grits recipe and wondering if it could be made up in advance and some fresh bacon put on it for a gourmet breakfast, but I have my doubts. I told her that I'd do bacon and eggs with pancakes and maple syrup.

So the question is - Do you guys have any ideas about what I can make to impress her with a really Awesome breakfast? I mean in your wildest food dreams? We're hiking in downhill so we can carry a lot of weight coming in - but no cast iron skillet - just Titanium. We'll cook on a double burner coleman Xpedition stove. - only the ingredients have to survive an 85 degree afternoon in a pack - maybe next to a frozen rabbit, and then being stored in a cold lake in a baggy overnight.
Thanks
Jim S (:->)

10:52 a.m. on July 21, 2003 (EDT)
(Guest)

Need Mimosa's

Put a bottle of Mimosa or wine in your pack next to the frozen hare. When you get to the campsite in the PM, start off the evening with chilled mimosa, cheese and crackers and finish the evening with cooled wine. You won't want the mimosa the next AM anyways.

11:57 a.m. on July 22, 2003 (EDT)
30 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
Go exotic. Have the rabbit for breakfast

hump in some frozen steaks and slice up some potato's for dinner. Slow cook everything in a little butter.

Wear the fur coat with nothing on underneath and then shoot her beavers while your sitting on a log. I'll guarantee she will have memories for a liftime.

1:51 p.m. on July 22, 2003 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Need Mimosa's

Wine has worked out pretty good for me. (Certainly has a better alcohol to weight ratio than packing in a lot of beer and less harsh than belting down whiskey or cognac.) Usually the bottles are kind of heavy, so it's worth funneling the vino into a platypus. Plus, any red is still tasty if it gets a bit warm.

Quote:

Put a bottle of Mimosa or wine in your pack next to the frozen hare. When you get to the campsite in the PM, start off the evening with chilled mimosa, cheese and crackers and finish the evening with cooled wine. You won't want the mimosa the next AM anyways.

4:37 p.m. on July 22, 2003 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: The fur coat

Quote:

hump in some frozen steaks and slice up some potato's for dinner. Slow cook everything in a little butter.

Wear the fur coat with nothing on underneath

Oh mercy, with steak and potatoes on the menu I'd gladly be the one to wear the fur coat with nothing on underneath! Thanks for the tip, Ed. Now I know what to wear on my next backpacking trip to make things a lot more interesting and memorable. Now I'll have to drop a hint to my partner to bring those steaks!

7:23 p.m. on July 22, 2003 (EDT)
37 reviewer rep
747 forum posts
Beaver fur coat

Quote:

Oh mercy, with steak and potatoes on the menu I'd gladly be the one to wear the fur coat with nothing on underneath!


My goodness Jo... don't you eat well when camping? (;->)One wonders what you would do for roast rabbit...

We are going skinny dipping so the coat is just a formality.

Thanks to all for the suggestions - even ED.

Jim S (:->)

6:02 a.m. on July 23, 2003 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Eating Well In Camp

Quote:

My goodness Jo... don't you eat well when camping? (;->)One wonders what you would do for roast rabbit...

Jim, I'm rather hesitant to prepare heavy meals when backpacking in bear country, as well as pursuing the mating game. I certainly don't want to be seen running away stark naked from a bear!

7:30 a.m. on July 23, 2003 (EDT)
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Running from the bare

I don't think the bear will mind.

10:14 a.m. on July 23, 2003 (EDT)
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747 forum posts
Re: Eating Well In Camp

Quote:

Quote:

My goodness Jo... don't you eat well when camping? (;->)

Jim, I'm rather hesitant to prepare heavy meals when backpacking in bear country

So the subject here is camp food. I kind of thought you guys were teasing about mountain house and instant grits. I wonder how many people actually go on a two or three day trip and eat that stuff? I have found that I never eat more than 1.5 to 2 pounds of real food in a day, so for 3-4 pounds I can eat any frsh food that I want. Why would someone choose to eat freeze dried food when it only adds maybe an extra 2-3 pounds to your pack to eat real food and you don't have to pack it out anyway? Is it because your basic packs weigh so much? I go ultralite then put in about 5 pounds of food and water. Thats why my pack is generally around 22-24 pounds - and because of the infrared scope and GPS of course.
I mean would you rather cook a steak over a campfire or have freeze dried something or another boiled in a pouch?
Jim S

11:33 a.m. on July 23, 2003 (EDT)
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Re: Eating Well In Camp

For one thing, steak is red meat. Definitely unhealthy. One of the secrets to becoming an Old GreyBearded One is avoiding unhealthy foods, like beef and other artificially raised, hormonally injected, high cholesterol garbage. Mammal meats are evil (with the exception of fresh wild venison, as long as it is harvested mano a mano, no contamination with lead). Fish is good, especially the kind you catch fresh from the stream (no, Ed, not those ugly, foul-tasting cat"fish" served deepfried in thick batter throughout the South). Veggies are good, fruit is good.

You want to impress her, then catch a mess of fresh trout, or get yourself a deer, using only your Swiss Army knife. The wine has to come from your own vineyards.

Seriously, Jimmy, even with all the artificial flavors and coloring added to the freeze-dry, I would take that any day over what passes for "steak" these days - too many hormones and antibiotics injected into domesticated food animals, which gives it a foul taste and smell, besides which beef, lamb, pork, etc has a very undesirable effect on my cholesterol levels.

11:41 a.m. on July 23, 2003 (EDT)
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Whattya mean? I truly love Mountain House!

I even eat it at home when the wife is away...course I happen to also love TV dinners, Dinty Moore stew and frozen fish sticks.

I like the conveinence of cooking a hearty meal by just boiling water, pouring it into a bag and laying back in the hammock while my dinner "cooks". I carry one Mountain House for every night. A two serving meal disappears in no time.

I only do the steak thing on a one night trip when I don't really care about a few extra pounds and don't have to worry about trying to clean a steak crusted pan.

My typical meal during a day on the trail is:

Breakfast - two envelopes of instant grits

Lunch - something in a tortilla. Usually peanut butter and jelly (pre mixed and carried in one squeesy tube), envelope of Tuna and envelope of mayo, beef stick slices and envelopes of mustard.

Dinner - Mountain House (stay the hell away from chili mac -it's terrible and it will bring in racoons from thirty miles away).

in between meals I'll eat Nature Valley Crunchy Granola Bars.

I only carry about five pounds of food for a three nighter.

5:08 p.m. on July 23, 2003 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Eating Well In Camp

Quote:

For one thing, steak is red meat. Definitely unhealthy. One of the secrets to becoming an Old GreyBearded One is avoiding unhealthy foods, like beef and other artificially raised, hormonally injected, high cholesterol garbage.

Well, my hiking partner has to have steak every week. It doesn't matter to him that he might be under the surgeon's knife in a few years. Live for today, man! That's their attitude and I can't change that. His father had to have his arteries stripped but that didn't stop him. Pork is his favorite cholesterol to consume, so I guess I'll be sitting in a waiting room for him some day (and sooner than he realizes).

Bill, I agree with you. Too much of a good thing is killing us. The older we get the more healthy we need to eat.

Now Jim, how about a nice omelet for breakfast - peppers, onions, eggs, cheese and bits of meat are okay, and possibly mushrooms if you can carry them in safely, toast and coffee. Yummy. You could cook it in a small amount of oil instead of butter. Olive oil is healthy.

6:33 p.m. on July 23, 2003 (EDT)
(Guest)

Olive Oil in What Container??

Quote:

Olive oil is healthy.

Since you brought it up, how does one backpack the olive oil? I have a fifty miler coming up and we're cooking mostly freeze-dried or other such stuff like cous cous, etc., meal in zip-lock bag type of items. However, I realize that olive oil has one of the highest calorie to weight values and adds great flavor. So what is the conventional wisdom on carrying the stuff and adding it to my meals?

8:48 p.m. on July 23, 2003 (EDT)
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Taco Bell Bill

Quote:

For one thing, steak is red meat. Definitely unhealthy. One of the secrets to becoming an Old GreyBearded One is avoiding unhealthy foods, like beef and other artificially raised, hormonally injected, high cholesterol garbage. Mammal meats are evil

Bill - Are you forgetting that I know you??? I've never seen you eat anyplace but Taco Bell or Burger King. In fact you must have every Burger King in the state punched into your GPS! Its bad enough to be seen there with you, but then they give me the senior discount too - guess its the white beard? Ah yea we'd like two Venison Whopper please with a senior drink...

Hiker girl - I am going to do the Huevo Quesadilla thing but with mushrooms and veggies and maybe some ham...
Jim S

8:50 p.m. on July 23, 2003 (EDT)
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747 forum posts
Olive Oil REI bottles

Quote:

Quote:

Olive oil is healthy.

Since you brought it up, how does one backpack the olive oil? I have a fifty miler coming up and we're cooking mostly freeze-dried or other such stuff like cous cous, etc.,

REI sells some cool small hard plastic bottles with good screw on lids. I carry instant coffee, creamer, and yes - olive oil in them - not mixed of course...
Jim S

9:56 p.m. on July 23, 2003 (EDT)
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Re: Taco Bell Bill

Both Taco Bell and Booger King have veggie dishes, salads, and such. You should have noticed that I don't get the tacos at Taco Bell. They use canola oil these days for the frijoles. And BK does have a veggie burger and broiled chicken (well, at least it isn't mammal meat, but it does have too many hormones, and if I get the broiled chicken, I always specify "no mayo"). And no, I don't have any fast food places punched in my GPSR (there are some in the built-in database, though, if they are close to an interstate exit, along with gas stations and other shops of one sort or another).

Hmmm, are you saying you haven't seen me eating during our BC ski treks or light-packing treks? You must have been too busy with the preparation of the huevos, carne de vaca, and such things. You could, of course, save some time by taking pre-baked bread instead of waiting for the dough to rise.

10:07 p.m. on July 23, 2003 (EDT)
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Tasty Bites

Ed, if you can find them in your local grocery store, try Tasty Bites. These are Indian and Thai dishes (including some curries). They are not freeze dried, but come in a foil or plastic pack that you drop into boiling water for a few minutes (varies according to which version). Open the packet and pour over rice. Very good! Most are pure vegetarian, but there are a few with chicken and some with red meats. You can order direct from their website http://www.tastybite.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv I first got acquainted with them on one of my treks up Denali. They are a bit heavy for a long backpack, but great for anything up to 3 or 4 days. We took them up Denali because we were double-hauling on sleds, so it wasn't too bad for such a great meal.

8:14 a.m. on July 24, 2003 (EDT)
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I have a great 16 oz hard plastic flask.

with a screw on shot glass. To hell with Olive Oil, after a few shots of the tequila I carry in the flask, I swear I'm partying with Popeye.

BTW, ziplock freezer bags can carry oil too. Throw it in a pot for protection.

10:52 p.m. on July 24, 2003 (EDT)
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So long and Thanks for the quesadilla...

Printed it, thanks. I'm gonna add mushrooms and maybe some cuded rabbit.
Jim S

11:11 a.m. on July 25, 2003 (EDT)
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How many mushrooms?..............42

nm

11:41 a.m. on August 14, 2003 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Olive Oil REI bottles

Quote:

Quote:

Quote:

Olive oil is healthy.

Since you brought it up, how does one backpack the olive oil? I have a fifty miler coming up and we're cooking mostly freeze-dried or other such stuff like cous cous, etc.,

REI sells some cool small hard plastic bottles with good screw on lids. I carry instant coffee, creamer, and yes - olive oil in them - not mixed of course...
Jim S

i use contact lense bottles 3oz for olive oil and keep it in a ziplock just in case.

2:00 p.m. on September 30, 2003 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Joe Walp, Joe, joewalp
Re: Olive Oil in What Container??

Quote:

how does one backpack the olive oil?

Consider the Coghlan's squeeze tubes. They're easy to clean. And, during winter, they'll allow you to sqeeze out the partially solidified oil. If you need more capacity, go with the Platypus Little Nipper bottle.

I think olive oil and tomato flavors complement each other nicely. Lots of my no-cook dishes start with couscous, powdered tomato and olive oil.

Incidentally, bulkfoods.com offers powdered tomato and textured vegetable protein at reasonable prices. Another tomato-like flavor option is the (relatively new) A.1. Steakhouse Seasonings Barbecue powder.

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