Favorite Backcountry Foods?

5:33 p.m. on August 10, 2009 (EDT)
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Thought it would be productive for people to list their favorite backpacking foods here, tips you've learned over the years, lessons learned, etc... Also, I'm a big fan of freezedried food, but haven't tried a ton of it, does anyone have any best/worst in that category? Thanks!

5:40 p.m. on August 10, 2009 (EDT)
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I know my first choice sounds kind of weird but I like Granola, blueberry's & milk my other choice is Jamaican BBQ Chicken.

5:55 p.m. on August 10, 2009 (EDT)
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I do have to say, you're right on about granola. I don't know what it is, but it tastes so much better after a day on the trail, though everything does.

6:25 p.m. on August 10, 2009 (EDT)
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lol I use granola as a food staple, I buy a box of granola and eat it as a snack all the time.

8:30 p.m. on August 10, 2009 (EDT)
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Granola and honey. Neither have to be refrigerated. I pour a handful of granola then top it with a little glop of honey. Very good and keeps you energized with the right balance of glycemic index foods. Add a good meal with protein for dinner such as tuna sandwiches: take a pack of flour tortillas, a squirt-bottle of mustard relish, and a few 3 oz packs of seasoned tuna (hickory smoked is my favorite). Put the tuna on a tortilla and top with mustard relish and roll it up. Very good and all non-refrigerated items that will last several days in your pack.

11:51 p.m. on August 10, 2009 (EDT)
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I know my first choice sounds kind of weird but I like Granola, blueberry's & milk my other choice is Jamaican BBQ Chicken.

Amen brother!

 

Okay this is going to sound weird too, and although not a real backpacking food, it is my favorite meal for the first night:

1. *Big juicy, fat marbled ribeye (carry it frozen) 2. Large baked potato (can be prebaked) 3. Fresh asparagus tips sauteed in butter (never canned or frozen)

*Yes I know....but I don't eat like that all the time.

 

Then for meals on subsequent days I use a mixture of nuts & dried fruits, store bought dry goods that are easy to cook like rice & pasta, and a selection of those fine freeze dried meals we all love!

I also enjoy a meal of fresh caught fish, great protein & omega three's, *you don't have to carry it in, and the reward of a hot meal you got the old fashioned way.

*Yes, I know...I have to carry the fishin pole.

12:03 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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I do like and do the steak trick trouthunter states. But for the most part I just get the freeze dried meal packs that are for two people. Then I just divide it out into two equal parts repackage it. Its actually cheap it come out to be $2.25-$3.75 per meal so it light weight, filling, stays with you unlike some meals, high protein & carb every thing you need when backpacking.

12:15 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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For a lot of my outings, as long as it provides the calories, I eat almost anything. However, after a month on a remote peak or someplace like the Antarctic, when I get home, I can't face an energy bar for at least a month (you have to supplement the rest of your food with something as concentrated as Clif bars to get to the 5000-6000 calories a day I burn on such trips - and still lose weight).

OTOH, at Patriot Hills (base camp for the Sentinel Range), we did run out of fresh vegetables and beer, and had to make do with sushi (prepared by our own Eichi), smoked salmon, curry chicken (prepared by the Indian Army group on their "survival exercise"), wine, and cognac. And on Kilimanjaro, I had to put up with fresh fruits and vegetables, boeuf bourginone (fresh beef, though I rarely eat beef) on freshly made noodles, chicken cacciatore, fresh green salad, and such for dinners, and lunches that always had fried chicken, banana, orange, cake, bread, one of several varieties of chocolate candy. It's a burden to have to survive on such skimpy rations ;)

On Denali, we used Tasty Bytes with rice for a number of the meals up to the 14,000 foot camp, then went on freeze dry for the week or so above 17,000 ft.

Yes, those are freeze dry dinners in the photos in my Antarctic article. But that was up on Vinson, where we didn't want to carry the extra weight. When we got back to Punta Arenas, we had somewhat more exotic fare.

12:15 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Yes the freeze dried meals are very convenient and are nutritional to boot. I'm trying to load a photo of the fish we caught on my last backpacking trip, it was a glorious meal for two worn out and very hungry guys.

12:23 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Bill S. said,

"OTOH, at Patriot Hills (base camp for the Sentinel Range), we did run out of fresh vegetables and beer, and had to make do with sushi (prepared by our own Eichi), smoked salmon, curry chicken (prepared by the Indian Army group on their "survival exercise"), wine, and cognac. And on Kilimanjaro, I had to put up with fresh fruits and vegetables, boeuf bourginone (fresh beef, though I rarely eat beef) on freshly made noodles, chicken cacciatore, fresh green salad, and such for dinners, and lunches that always had fried chicken, banana, orange, cake, bread, one of several varieties of chocolate candy. It's a burden to have to survive on such skimpy rations ;)"

Man oh man! I've got to get into mountaineering, now that's living!

12:31 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Bill,

Sounds like you have it rough! Haha I need to find some way to pack such awesome meals, I guess for the time being I will rely on freezedried foods. As far as the fresh fish mentioned by trouthunter, there really is nothing better, unfortunately I prefer to backpack in the adirondacks where there is a catch and release policy for many of the species, hampering my options while on the trail. BTW trouthunter I am getting ready for an offshore tournament in Sept. out of Atlantic Beach NC, I will be sure to let you know how that goes.

1:25 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Hay ADKer were in NY do you live?

Ill be heading up to the ADK this weekend for a couple of days

We seem to be getting some people here from NY, Good I was getting lonely lol

As far as a fresh freshwater fish dinner goes im not big on it sorry to say, ill eat it but its not high on my list.

2:00 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Preachin to the choir Trouthunter! Great Harvest by the way I am soooooo jelous!

8:15 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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I like to de-hydrate home made chilli. Then I'll also pack in the stuff to make fry-bread. Once on the trail I'll re-hydrate and heat up the chilli along with making the frybread. Once both are done I put the chilli over the fry bread to make "Navajo Tacos" (actual name of dish). A bit of work, but well worth it.

9:25 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Mike,

I actually live in Raleigh, NC born there live there, but my Mom's side of the family is from Plattsburgh where they had an apple orchard and dairy farm. As I was growing up we would drive up to the adirondacks a couple times a year to see family and hike. Its just such a great place to hike, much better than the hiking I have down here, so I'm pulled back to backpack and work on my 46. Where do you primarily hike up there? I know its hard to say, there are so many great areas and beautiful hikes, but we all have our favorites

9:47 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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For me, variety is the name of the game when backpacking. Being a vegetarian helps to limit my choices and I don't have to worry about keeping meat fresh or having something with me that might really attract the big mammals.

I'm always looking for new stuff, and if I find something interesting I'll make an online search to get new stuff. This has worked on purchases of Mary Jane's Farm bulk meals, Tasty Bite cases of Indian meals, bulk orders of Pro Bars, Boomi-Bars, GU gels, Larabars, Bear Valley Pemmican bars, Hawk Vittle meals, and just recently a big order of raw goat milk cheddar cheese from Mt Sterling, etc. I always take a couple pounds of cheese out with me.

Otherwise, I get everything else from my local grocery store, especially apples/pears which pack well and go with the best backpacking meal in the world: Apples and goat cheese! On my last 14 day trip I took out a whole dozen eggs in a little plastic "suitcase". Using a 2 liter titanium pot, it's possible to scramble up 2 or 3 eggs if you first coat the bottom of the pot with a liberal amount of coconut oil. Makes cleaning much easier.

I like my GU gels when I'm on the trail and I'm always looking for decent power bars. And I always take a couple full loaves of sprouted whole wheat bread, Ezekial comes to mind, along with Nature's Path Manna Bread--very hearty stuff.

10:39 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Tipi - I'm also a vegetarian. I've found a number of good recipe's in the book: "Lip Smackin' Vegetarian Backpackin" ... just as a heads up.

11:25 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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The old staple mac-and-cheese can be given a delicious twist by carrying one of those foil pouches of salmon they sell in supermarkets now. The foil is a lot easier to pack out than the cans that were the only container previously. They also have chicken and tuna in the foil pouches, but for my money, the salmon is the tastiest in mac-and-cheese. Oh, and add in some Knorr's dried vegetables, also from a foil pouch, while the mac is cooking. Feeds two a lot cheaper than Mtn House etc.

11:43 a.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Chocolate

(I'll add more later, but this is by far my favorite.)

1:38 p.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Chocolate's good, especially while hiking. For first night, I don't carry steak, but frozen ground beef and taco seasoning. For a staple, tortillas and peanut butter. I also like dehydrated soups and pasta, with an occasional Mountain House chili mac.

2:23 p.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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ADKer I guess I would have to say my favorite places in the adk are 5 Ponds & Wolf Lake. But I did come across a interesting trail south west of Plattsburgh that you may be interested in in the link below is a page that explains it and a linK to a map you should check it out. I put on my list of places to go.

http://whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=52994

2:36 p.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Mike sounds like a nice little loop, always interested in ways to bag those unmaintained peaks too. Thanks!

2:50 p.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Yes it does look like a good place to go, Ill be up there this weekend and I was thinking of changing my plans of where I am going to go and give it a try but I'm not sure yet ill have to do some more research.

2:56 p.m. on August 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Chocolate

(I'll add more later, but this is by far my favorite.)

I really like trailmix with some chocolate in it.

11:16 a.m. on August 12, 2009 (EDT)
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I'm a pretty basic backcountry food person. I don't do a lot of involved cooking. I like lots of basic stuff though, like pasta, couscous, some meals (Mary Jane's Farm I like), but I do the bulk of my shopping at the grocery store versus an outdoor store.

So, favorite hiking/backpacking foods:

chocolate (as I already said), this includes in trail mix/granola, cocoa in the morning or at night, and the occasional candy bar or dessert.

cheese: I think it goes well with so many things, on bagels, in wraps, with couscous, pastas, cheese makes many things better.

wraps/tortillas: they're easy to pack, don't get squished, and you can put a bunch of stuff in there (like cheese, protein in some form, dried veggies, couscous, beans, rice) and seal it to eat and it's a non-messy meal.

oatmeal: especially with different dried fruits and/or granola.

the salmon/tuna/chicken foil packets: they're somewhat heavy, but if you eat meat they can be nice to bring along.

dried fruits and veggies: to mix into different meals and keep it interesting.

snacks: I like/need to eat frequently. So, I like to have some bars and/or granola/trail mix or something regularly. My son likes the organic squished fruit snacks. They're just organic fruit and juice flattened.

I'm going to add some of the suggestions above to my list of backpacking foods.

3:11 p.m. on August 12, 2009 (EDT)
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Alicia,

Thats a great list, I'm adding that to my backpacking food spreadsheet, (yes I know I'm a nerd).

4:52 p.m. on August 12, 2009 (EDT)
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I take macaroni and cheese, Granola, instant oatmeal fruit and cream varietys, Jack cheese with Jalapenos, homemade GORP with dried fruit bits like papaya and mango instead of raisens, Top Ramen, Lipton Noodle or Rice Instant mixes, Dry milk powder, beef and chicken buillion cubes, sugar free hard candies, Bisquik mix for pancakes,tortilla's and stick biscuits, home dried vegies,Gatorade drink mixes, Tang, freeze dried coffee, instant cocoa, pretzels (sometimes in the GORP), various sturdy crackers like Triskets,Wheat Thins, sardines and tuna, beef and/or turkey jerky. I think that about covers it, oh and hard salami or stick pepperoni.

11:26 p.m. on August 12, 2009 (EDT)
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For breakfast I like muesli. 1-1/2 cup dry. To this I add 1/4 cup nido, and 1/4 cup vanilla flavored protein powder. Either hot or cold a very satisfying and "stick to the ribs" meal.

For lunch I like peanut butter and whole grain tortillas.

Dinner I can take or leave. I seldom feel like cooking so I usually go with a prepackaged dehydrated dinner from backpacker pantry or mountain house, though they are not that spectacular. My dinners could use some help.

1:16 a.m. on August 13, 2009 (EDT)
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I guess I am more of a simple person. I use the prepackaged dehydrated dinner from backpacker pantry or mountain house for the most part. I don't get very creative with trail cooking. I'm normally solo so for the most part is easier and its pretty cheap as well with not much preparation or cooking time.

9:17 a.m. on August 13, 2009 (EDT)
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I guess I am more of a simple person. I use the prepackaged dehydrated dinner from backpacker pantry or mountain house for the most part. I don't get very creative with trail cooking. I'm normally solo so for the most part is easier and its pretty cheap as well with not much preparation or cooking time.

Anything from REAL of Norway. Best freeze dried food made IMO.

Too bad you can't get them here in the States...yet.

10:16 a.m. on August 13, 2009 (EDT)
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Do you know if that brand able to be bought over the internet and reasonable prices. If you have a link to there website could you post it, I did a quick Google search but it harvested no results.

11:41 a.m. on August 13, 2009 (EDT)
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Hmmm, the title of this thread is "Favorite Backpacking Foods". Most of the posts seem to be "What I usually take backpacking". As I posted earlier, my Favorites were those on certain Special Grand Expeditions, like Denali, Kilimanjaro, and Antarctica. I left out another Favorite. In 1963, a group of us from the UCLA Bruin Mountaineers set out over Thanksgiving Weekend to do some climbs in the Palisades region of the Sierra Nevada. That was an early snow year, so we went in on a mix of snowshoes and skis. We ended up not doing a lot of climbing, but we had a full Thanksgiving Dinner of turkey (packages of sliced turkey), cranberry sauce (heavy cans), yams (again, heavy cans), string beans (freezedry), and mincemeat (not a mince pie, but a block of mincemeat broken into chunks for each person). We spent much of the weekend hiking in to Sam Mack Meadow and camping in the snow in a type of 4-man tent you don't see anymore, plus hiking up onto the Palisade Glacier and going part way up the U-Notch.

Now, if you want to know about The Usual - well, that's mostly freeze dry (much better these days than back in the 1960s), supplemented with energy bars, gorp, "regular" candy bars, oatmeal (aka "bloatmeal"), muesli, granola, Tang (gotta have that Vitamin C), hot chocolate, Italian dry salami, turkey jerky, pastas of one sort or another, cheeses (mostly dry cheeses) - note that this is all aimed at packing in lots of calories, with the high fat and high protein serving to provide the slower absorption that is needed to keep the energy at a more constant level than the sugars and starches. Again, this is "The Usual", not "Favorite Backpack Foods". When you are out for more than a week at a time, the fresh foods and gourmet cooking pretty much are too heavy. One exception, though - you can have fresh bean sprouts even several weeks out.

One little tale about my involvement with freeze dry foods - The sponsor of my scholarship as an undergrad was Food Machinery and Chemical, later known as FMC Corp., currently part of United Technologies. They also provided summer jobs. In the summer between my sophomore and junior years, they brought me to the company headquarters in San Jose. One project being worked on was how to do freezedrying of foods in large quantities. When my boss found out I was an avid backpacker, he put me in touch with the project manager of the freezedry group. Each weekend, they would hand me several packages of the latest experiment with the instructions "if you figure out how to successfully rehydrate this stuff, let us know." This led to a number of amusing adventures, including the time they gave me a huge bag of freezedry apple slices. My climbing partner and I opened the bag on our peak of the weekend and munched away on these crunchy, light slices. This made us thirsty, of course, so we headed down from the peak and sat by a stream drinking cups of water. You can guess what happened as the apple bits absorbed the water. My report from the weekend was "rehydrate first, eat afterward".

12:22 p.m. on August 13, 2009 (EDT)
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...." This led to a number of amusing adventures, including the time they gave me a huge bag of freezedry apple slices. My climbing partner and I opened the bag on our peak of the weekend and munched away on these crunchy, light slices. This made us thirsty, of course, so we headed down from the peak and sat by a stream drinking cups of water. You can guess what happened as the apple bits absorbed the water. My report from the weekend was "rehydrate first, eat afterward".

Hay Bill I had a similar experience but it was Dehydrated Banana slices not freezedryed apple slices. My experience taught me, a couple of hand full's of banana slices and a quart of water goes a long way. Actually a bit too far.

2:20 p.m. on August 13, 2009 (EDT)
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My report from the weekend was "rehydrate first, eat afterward".

Ha ha! Good advice, Bill.

Okay, both my favorite and my usual lists still include chocolate.

I guess my favorite meal would be if some gourmet backcountry cook wanted to carry in and then whip up something more complex than my usual, possibly involving pasta, veggies, and cheese.

I also really like wraps with rice, cheese, and veggies, and maybe some meat for the carnivores.

A favorite snack/dessert would be fresh baked brownies or s'mores, with different melting candy options.

I'm still pretty basic, but I'm willing to try most things.

2:20 p.m. on August 13, 2009 (EDT)
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I start the day with porridge/oatmeal with milk powder and nido. Some dry fruits and dutch fruit loaf for the day and if I can get some then anything that the N.Z “one square meal” and cookie time makes. Meals: Pasta with salami/ pepperoni, cheese and dried veggies…I leave some water with it and add dehydrated soup for the taste. The same thing will go with rice, instant mesh potato and couscous. You can mix nido with milk powder and suger and have a really yammy spred. I plan on trying to de-hydrate home made chilli – would love to try it out :)

2:38 p.m. on August 13, 2009 (EDT)
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Thanks everyone! Turned out some very helpful posts I think, this has really given me some great ideas for good backcountry food-this is important because over my college's falll break I'm bringing my girlfriend of three years on her first backpacking trip! Needless to say I want her first experience to be as good as it can be so that she will want to continue coming along.

Thanks!

3:07 p.m. on August 13, 2009 (EDT)
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Thinly sliced salami is my favorite.

3:39 p.m. on August 13, 2009 (EDT)
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..... Needless to say I want her first experience to be as good as it can be so that she will want to continue coming along.

Very good plan ADKer.

8:27 p.m. on August 13, 2009 (EDT)
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I start the day with porridge/oatmeal with milk powder and nido. Some dry fruits and dutch fruit loaf for the day and if I can get some then anything that the N.Z “one square meal” and cookie time makes. Meals: Pasta with salami/ pepperoni, cheese and dried veggies…I leave some water with it and add dehydrated soup for the taste. The same thing will go with rice, instant mesh potato and couscous. You can mix nido with milk powder and suger and have a really yammy spred. I plan on trying to de-hydrate home made chilli – would love to try it out :)

I have a decent chilli recipe if you would like to make your own. Just let me know.

11:14 a.m. on August 16, 2009 (EDT)
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If I can afford the weight, first (or second) night burritos. Whenever I make burritos at home (various mixtures of beef, chicken, or bean with of course cheese and veggies) I roll up some extras, wrap them individually in foil, and freeze them. Depending on the outdoor temp and when I 'm going to want them, take them out of the freezer and put them in a travel cooler or just let them thaw. Warm them up with the foil on by rolling them around on a frying pan or woodstove or over a not-too-hot fire. Bring along some salsa and maybe sour cream. Rice on the side for extra calories. Heavy, but sooo good!

My wife's homemade granola is all I really need for breakfast, and her energy bars, a variation of the legendary Tuck Bars sold at the AMC's Pinkham Notch Base Camp where she used to work, are always good for a mid-day blast of energy. I guess I should post the recipes on the other thread.

BUT since we're telling (freeze-dried) food stories...

I was once with a group doing ecological field work in the mountains on Isla Chiloe, Chile. It was decided by the organizers that rather than deal with the hassles of shopping locally we would just bring a lot of freeze-dried meals from the US. But there was also a group of Chilean scientist along, and we had most of food and research gear horse-packed the 10k or so in to a little hut where we all stayed. So the Chileans brought a variety of fresh food, and were cooking up some pretty good looking meals every nigh while we were rehydrating our freeze dried stews etc in plastic bags. Night after night they would politely offer us a taste of whatever they were having and we would generally accept a modest helping. Then we would offer them a portion of ours, and they would, as politely as they could say, "Uh, no thanks, I'm fine."

Freeze-dried has it's place, but just about anything else is better. There's something about the ritual (and chore) of preparing and blending ingredients and cooking them in specific ways that just makes the result taste better. And although there's something about outdoor living that seems to generate excess flatulence, most freeze-dried food in my experience is a wicked gas catalyst with really evil-smelling results.

2:51 p.m. on August 17, 2009 (EDT)
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I like the freeze dried foods by Mountain House compared to Backpackers brand. These are sold by REI, Anymountain and some of out local grocery stores. The mountain house tasted better that the very bland tasting Backpackers ones.

But tortilla serves almost anything with trailmixes. We were in Desolation wilderness last week and it rained, hailed, snow flurries and was very windy on a Thursday (up in Lake Aloha). We tried going on a hike early in the morning but got pelted by hail so we retreated to our tent which was tied down to some pine trees. We made some hunker down meal. This was composed of some flour tortilla with blue berry flavor to it. Tuna from starkist the small individual packs, honey from those plastic packets like the one from Kentucky Fried Chicken, and some trail mix from Costco..the rice crackers ones. Wow, this tasted so good that we made it again when we got home.

Paul

11:50 p.m. on August 17, 2009 (EDT)
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On a recent trip I made burritos on the first night - I carried in fresh tortillas, cheddar, foil pack chicken, and green Tabasco. It was pretty good. Other times I have done the frozen steaks with potatoes, etc.

The Easy Mac with foil pack tuna or salmon really hits the spot after a few days on the trail, as does the flavored instant mashed potatoes with foil pack Spam. And the Rice A Roni four cheese with foil pack chicken works really well, too.

For after dinner, I am particularly fond of Nutella (just grab a spoon and eat it out of the jar) and marzipan.

For freeze-dried meals, I like Mountain House best. Polynesian Chicken, Lasagna, Turkey tetrazzini, Beef stroganoff, beef stew are all good.

2:27 p.m. on August 20, 2009 (EDT)
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I enjoy packing in a frozen Cornish Hen (small chicken) for a great meal. The birds usually weigh about a pound, and come sealed in plastic. I usually only do this where I know I'll be able to build a fire, and roast over the fire for about 2-3 hours. All you need is a little s&p for seasoning. I like to stuff the bird with some cooked rice pilaf or couscous for the last hour of cooking. Talk about tasty! They cook up nice, and it beats chasing grouse through the woods with a knife (haha), but I have to tell you, packing out the bones can be a pain in the butt.

12:51 a.m. on August 28, 2009 (EDT)
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I like hotdogs and beans (cooked in the can). Strong coffee in the morning with a side of "Chana Marsala" with some exellent baguette bread. The Chana Marsala, (Hindu Chickpeas with tomato and onion) is from "I shop India" which comes in a pouch just boil in the coffee water.

This Indian fare I highly recommend, as it is protein rich, tasty as hell, and completely vegetarian. At $2.25 a serving, its quite the steal.

This weekend I plan to experment with some form of (native American Indian) bread cooked over the end of a stick, as a bread bowl for the Indian food.

On labor day, I'm heading for the trout streams, hopefully some good trout recipes will show up here at some point.

6:27 p.m. on September 2, 2009 (EDT)
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I think my favorite dinner meal is one I came up with last year and become a regular in my pack since. My buddy calls it "backpackers shepherd pie". I put a .25cp of dehydrated mixed veggies and a 2oz package of shelf stable bacon in 2cps of water and bring to a boil. Remove from heat and let it sit for a while to hydrate and stir in enough instant garlic mashed potatoes to the thickness I like. You can use half the pack of bacon to stretch for two meals and it's still very good.

It's also hard to beat an instant cheese cake at the end of a hard days hike.

12:56 a.m. on September 7, 2009 (EDT)
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My friend and I experiment all the time. SHe has a dehydrator. One of our very favs, and all the kids LOVE this is to dehy refries, so later we can rehy and warm them, put on a carb-light tortilla (tons of fiber) with a stick of cheese, and a packet or two of restaurant hot sauce. It's sooo good when we are out! I love the instant packaged potatoes too. The loaded are great to put shelf stable bacon into.

 

The BEST is almond butter on a tortilla with fresh huckleberries crammed into the wrap with a good drizzle of honey. Oh, my. Best lunch in the universe! Best served with a good dose of wilderness along side a mountain stream with good friends :)

11:28 p.m. on September 7, 2009 (EDT)
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I know my first choice sounds kind of weird but I like Granola, blueberry's & milk my other choice is Jamaican BBQ Chicken.

Dude, that's not at all weird. Granola is almost all I eat, you can get packaged UHT milk that has a long shelf life and you can take backpacking. and freezedried blueberries are hella good!

12:21 p.m. on September 8, 2009 (EDT)
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My friend and I experiment all the time. SHe has a dehydrator. One of our very favs, and all the kids LOVE this is to dehy refries, so later we can rehy and warm them, put on a carb-light tortilla (tons of fiber) with a stick of cheese, and a packet or two of restaurant hot sauce. It's sooo good when we are out! I love the instant packaged potatoes too. The loaded are great to put shelf stable bacon into.

The BEST is almond butter on a tortilla with fresh huckleberries crammed into the wrap with a good drizzle of honey. Oh, my. Best lunch in the universe! Best served with a good dose of wilderness along side a mountain stream with good friends :)

When you dehydrate the refries do you just use canned from the store and how much water do you ad, an equal ammount to the beans by volume?

11:04 p.m. on September 15, 2009 (EDT)
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Gary,

yes, we just use fatfree refries. I believe they dehy down to 3-4 oz, so it takes 12ish oz to rehy. Part of it is practice. We also notice that we plan to eat the equivalent of a can each when we are working hard. We burn off most of the "problem" that way, too :)

But, most of what we would normally eat at home, like jambalaya, chicken alfredo, etc can be dehy. We just add the meat at camp. Saves tons of money, and we find it's much tastier, with vastly less salt.

Just with the packaged chicken, we found that frying it before adding it to meals really helps with consistency. I think that would hold true in anything one added chicken to.

2:35 p.m. on September 18, 2009 (EDT)
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There's a small internet company

www.packlitefoods.com

that has great meal choices. All good ingredients, no chemicals, and portioned for hikers. My very favorite dinner is their pasta primavera - large chunks of vegetables and mushrooms with pasta. Soak the pasta for 2 minutes before lighting your stove, will cook in about 3 or 4 minutes, let sit for a few minutes - absolutely delicious.

9:23 p.m. on September 20, 2009 (EDT)
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Check out freezer bag cooking on line,google it.Very good,easy clean up.cheap as you like and good for you too.I also love instant Orida garlic mashed potatoes,cant get enough.Also those small foil packets of salmon or real crab meat added to a noodles base with powdered soap and cheese added in is very good,back to freezer bag cooking now.I also do eat some of the mountain house brand freeze dried foods,the best of the lot to me.There are many great foods in the super markets these days to make your own meals with.And yes fresh caught fish is also high on the list for me.ymmv

August 21, 2014
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