Camp stoves

10:39 a.m. on December 19, 2010 (EST)
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I recently purchased an Ozark Trail propane camp stove, after reading the reviews on it I returned it to Wal mart and went to Academy and purchased an Outdoor Experiance Timber Creek stove but I can't find any reviews on this stove. If anyone has ever purchased one I would like your feedback on wether to keep it or return it to the store (i kept the receipt) thank you

2:31 p.m. on December 19, 2010 (EST)
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Maybe you should do the research first then get a stove. I have two stoves, a Pocket Rocket  Butane/propane one by MSR and and an old Svea 123 white gas stove (I use regular auto gas for it)  The MSR stove I use in summer and the Svea in the winter.

With fuel in it the Svea weighs maybe a pound, the MSR Pocket Rocket stove weighs a few ounces for just the top. The Canisters come in many different canister sizes. The canister in the image below is about a 4 oz one. Adds about a few more ounces.

The way I cook an average of one meal a day, I can make a 4 oz canister for the MSR last about 2 weeks.


Svea-123-stove.jpg
Svea 123 stove


MSR-Pocket-Rocket-stove.jpg

MSR Pocket Rocket stove

3:05 p.m. on December 19, 2010 (EST)
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I recently purchased an Ozark Trail propane camp stove, after reading the reviews on it I returned it to Wal mart and went to Academy and purchased an Outdoor Experiance Timber Creek stove but I can't find any reviews on this stove. If anyone has ever purchased one I would like your feedback on wether to keep it or return it to the store (i kept the receipt) thank you

Gad where are you at in Texas? if your in Austin  they have a whole earth provision Company down by campus or Rei up on Reasearch, My question is the stove for just one person? Are you planning on cooking for more than one person? If just for you I love my jetboil and it heats within 3 mins. I lter cup for food or drink. The main thing is if you spend a little more you can get a great stove. Both stores have good selection of stoves in different price ranges, the reatil on it about 80. But its a good stove for me.

3:10 p.m. on December 19, 2010 (EST)
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I'd say return the one you bought as well, and buy one that has a better reputation.

 

I personally have the Coleman Peak 1 micro butane stove. It's 26 bucks at Walmart, and does exactly what other brand name stoves do without charging stupid prices for it.

 

Also, it takes other fuel canisters. I have used the above posted MSR isopro fuel with it, and because I do winter backpacking and mountaineering, I have used Jet boil's winter mix fuel. Don't bother trying to find the Coleman fuel that usually fits with it, it's a pain in the butt because none of the Walmarts ever carry it.

 

I've used this for cooking when car camping, in 0-15 degrees F, and at about 5K feet with no problems at all. Just remember to keep the fuel canister in your jacket while hiking - if it's warm, it boils water in about 3 minutes, if the canister is cold, there isn't enough pressure to push the gas out into the flame, and it may never boil the water.

 

Honesty, it's your preference, but I'm so sick of all the brand snobbery, that I chime in with the deals I find as frequently as possible. The stove works, and it works well - why pay more just to say you have such and such brand??

7:42 p.m. on December 19, 2010 (EST)
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I am still using my tried and true Optimus 8R. I run white gas in it. Mine is in better shape than the one in the video.

 

 

9:59 p.m. on December 19, 2010 (EST)
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Gad its obvious you have your doubts about the stove. you cant find information on it. So if you feel uncomfortable with it By all means return it. . Maybe going and priceing some stoves and then comeing back to trailspace  would make you feel more comfortable. Write down the stoves and then check on a review of the item. Only you know what type of activity you will use it for.That might be an option? if I have question I ask here as well and have and gotten options and information on an item I was interested in and gotten something economical and I felt was worth while.

10:09 p.m. on December 19, 2010 (EST)
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Take it back and get a Jetboil you'll never regret it.

10:09 a.m. on December 20, 2010 (EST)
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I use a Optimus Nova+ that I got before Katadyn took over a quality dropped. I also use several DIY pressurized Alchohol I made. I do think I would trust a really off brand that I can't find any reviews for. Off brands are not always bad, sometimes they are a great deal and acceptable quality. But if you can't find any feedback on it, or the feedback you find isn't great, I would steer clear. Just my thoughts.

6:14 p.m. on December 20, 2010 (EST)
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Thanks for all the feedback, I live in Louisiana and the stove was purchased because after hurricane Gustav because we were without electricity for about two weeks, plus I tailgate every so often. I chose propane because I already own a few bottles. All that said and done I am gonna stop being a cheapo and go buy a Coleman

again thanks

11:52 p.m. on December 20, 2010 (EST)
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This is an interesting stove. You can run it on wood and other fuels like hexamine block.

 

12:52 p.m. on January 2, 2011 (EST)
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I've been testing something called The Vital Stove from www.eurekatentscanada.com and really love it. It, like the Bush Buddy, is a twig stove. It has a fan and damper so you can really control the output.

1:04 p.m. on January 18, 2011 (EST)
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Not the answer to your specific question, but here are a couple of good resources for fuel/stove selection and use that fall under this subject line:

http://zenstoves.net/StoveChoices.htm

http://www.howardjohnson.name/Backpacking/Stove/Stoves.htm

4:17 p.m. on January 28, 2011 (EST)
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Gary,

How does the Svea run with the gasoline?  Is it more sooty or dirty than white gas?  Why not use white gas?  When I was stove shopping I was down to the Whisperlite and the Whisperlite International (which will run on just about anything).  I chose the white gas version, because I couldn't think of a time where I would use so much fuel as to not be able to get more white gas....plus I have a home made pressurized alky as a backup.

5:45 p.m. on February 4, 2011 (EST)
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Hey guys, I've got a backpacking stove, an MSR WhisperLite International.  But I'm looking for some advice on a small car camping stove of decent quality. As I'm not always in the backcountry. Something large enough to cook for two people. I guess with two burners. I see colmens everywhere, but because their sold even at K-Mart I have to wonder about the quality.

5:07 a.m. on February 5, 2011 (EST)
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..I see colmens everywhere, but because their sold even at K-Mart I have to wonder about the quality.

Coleman family camping stoves are reliable work horses.  Replacement parts and optional accessories are easy to come by, though the only part I ever had to replace is the fuel jet orifice.  I have the standard white gas two burner in a suitcase model, which I have augmented with a propane conversion kit   Switches between fuels in moments.  I usually use propane for car camp trips, using those five gallon tanks sold for BBQs.  The propane configuration works best.  One complaint about the Coleman two burners is the second burner is anemic in the white gas version, while this is almost a nonissue issue when cooking with propane. My stove is thirty some years old, has cooked hundreds of meals, yet looks only a year old.  You can easily disassemble it almost completely for cleaning. 

Ed

11:49 a.m. on February 5, 2011 (EST)
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I would also recommend the two burner Coleman, they are very reliable.

Mine is over 20 years old, I have the white gas version. The propane types are easier to use, with less refueling if you use the 20 lb tanks, but the white gas types are cheaper to operate (especially vs. the small propane cylinder) if you don't pay a premium price for white gas, shop around.

Either way Coleman suitcase two burner stoves are much better than the other cheaper brands also sold at the big stores. One tank of white gas or one smaller propane cylinder should last a weekend.

12:07 p.m. on February 5, 2011 (EST)
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Alright, sounds like the perfect addition to our vehicle for all those times we're not in the back country but car camping. Thanks for the info guys!

4:28 p.m. on February 12, 2011 (EST)
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+1 on multi-burner dual fuel stove.

I've had mine for 13 years. It will run white gas, unleaded gas or kerosine. I've always run unleaded (auto) gas in it. Works fantastic for car camping and have used it annually from sea level to about 7,000 foot elevation. Super stable and easy to set up. At night you can quickly close and latch it to keep out the varmits.

I've never had trouble with the second burner. If the flame is low, it usually means you need to pump up the fuel tank a few strokes (which you can do while it's running). Second burner lacks the fine tune adjusting, but you can pick the pot you put on it.

This stove was a real lifesaver when I lived in the tropics and a typhoon left us without power for a month. Cooked every meal on it for family of three. Stove has yet to need any parts or service. Buy one.

12:31 a.m. on March 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Ditto on the coleman 2 burners.  You don't need a more expensive, heavy, and bulky Camp Chef.

12:22 p.m. on March 19, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm using a Coleman Xpedition (2 burner) Powermax stove for my car camping.  Besides the Powermax canisters, I've got adapters to use  regular lindal valve gas canisters or 16.4oz straight disposable propane canisters (can run off the 5 gallon refillable tanks also).   

b.gin

12:21 a.m. on March 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey laurieAnn,

 

Here is the vital stove.

12:48 a.m. on March 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Hi,

I use a vintage Optimus 00 kerosene pressure stove. It holds one pint, and roars with a beautiful atmospheric blue flame. I have a small hobby type collection... I have a bunch of camp stoves.  I have maybe 90. Give or take a few.  Check out Classic Camp Stoves, at Spiritburner.com   They are the go to resource for stove info.

Lately I've been taking along an older Swedish Trangia 27-8 alcohol stove. They're amazing, and they work in high winds, and are silent.

You should look on eBay, and type in Camp Stoves.

Best,

Al in Oklahoma

Stovie

Here's a Primus 210, similar type to my Optimus 00. In my hideout...

5:23 a.m. on March 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Some posts (above) with good advice.  I would suggest that cost is one of the less important criteria, regardless what you may think.  There are plenty of affordable stoves that are dependable, but don't get carried away, saving a few dollars on a brand or model that lacks valid positive testimonies.  A broken stove can ruin a trip, and cost more than you'll ever save on a blue light special.

Ed

3:32 a.m. on March 21, 2011 (EDT)
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I agree that cost is probably of lesser importance if you intend to make a meaningful purchase.  Your choice of stove, just like any other piece of equipment, will need to fulfill a specific and personal requirement.  In the future, you may find yourself with 3 or 4 stoves for different purposes.  Think about what your primary intended use will be and do some research.  Not only will you get up to speed on what's out there, you'll educate yourself as well. 

6:46 p.m. on March 21, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey laurieAnn,

Here is the vital stove.

Hmmm .....lessee now, the "Vital Stove" uses batteries (this is "green?"),  lights the initial wood shavings or paper (can't really tell what it is) with a butane lighter (again, this is "green"?), and in the demo the pot of water falls off the stove, while the guy eats deer droppings (well, fakes it anyway). He burns various sticks, pine cones, etc - better not go to a heavily used campsite which has been scoured of burnable debris.

OK, so how is this superior to the Sierra Stove, which has been around for many years? Maybe the airflow is more controllable. Oh, wait!!! He said the battery and fan feed oxygen (!!!) to the fire!! I see, the battery and fan housing (with its adjustable inlet) somehow separate the oxygen from the air (which is roughly 20% O2 and 80% nitrogen and other stuff). WOW! I gotta learn about the chemistry of this thing.

Ok, looks interesting. But the guy did overstate things a bit. Does make an amusing video, though.

11:49 p.m. on March 22, 2011 (EDT)
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Ed's insight that a stove malfunction can ruin a trip means that an off brand is not worth the risk in my book.  I think that the suggestions to stick with Coleman is right on.  As noted, the quality is unbeatable and spare parts are easy to come by if needed.

I own 2 of the 2 burner white gas, a Peak single burner white gas and relied on a propane 2 burner for 2 summers in Alaska.  The only problem I ever had was that one of the 2 burner white gas models is about 20 years old and I did not keep the pump oiled regularly.  The gasket dried out and needed to be replaced after a summer of hard use.  This was my fault entirely.

The choice between white gas and propane is up to you.  They both have pros and cons.

6:01 a.m. on April 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Tried them all except the ultralite alky stoves.  Best IMHO #1 old Coleman white gas, yeah gotta pump it buy burns like a blow torch, heavy, #2 Giga power, light less than 3 Oz, but used a canister. #3 Sierra stove, burns woods, paper, bark, pine cones, old cow patties, etc, needs a battery heavy and dirty to handle, #4 esbit  OK but smelly.

2:59 p.m. on April 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Hi,

I use a vintage Optimus 00 kerosene pressure stove. It holds one pint, and roars with a beautiful atmospheric blue flame. I have a small hobby type collection... I have a bunch of camp stoves.  I have maybe 90. Give or take a few.  Check out Classic Camp Stoves, at Spiritburner.com   They are the go to resource for stove info.

Lately I've been taking along an older Swedish Trangia 27-8 alcohol stove. They're amazing, and they work in high winds, and are silent.

You should look on eBay, and type in Camp Stoves.

Best,

Al in Oklahoma

Stovie

Here's a Primus 210, similar type to my Optimus 00. In my

hideout...

What's the deal with the TRANGIA Series 27 ? I've never known the differences between the various models (#25, #27, #28,  etc.).     Also, what does the last / suffix number (-5, -6, -7, etc.)  indicate ??

Yogi Robt

5:30 p.m. on April 19, 2011 (EDT)
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The Trangia 25 is a larger model (3 to 4 people per Trangia).  The pots are 1.5L in size.  The Trangia 27 is a bit smaller (1 to 2 people per Trangia).  The pots are 1.0L in size. 

The Trangia 28 is the "mini" Trangia with a 0.8L pot size (for solo use).  The mini Trangia does not have the full traditional "stormkök" windshields.

The smaller numbers indicate a particular configuration of the set (what is included, type of pot metal, etc).  See http://trangia.se/english/2913.trangia_stoves.html

HJ

9:20 a.m. on April 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks, HJ.

Gave you a "yes" kudo, in the feedback "helpful"  deal.

Yogi Robt

10:18 a.m. on April 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Hi Jim!

Nice to see you.

It's looking like Old Home week around here. :0)

Al in Oklahoma

5:35 p.m. on April 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Hi, Al,

Nice to bump into you too.  Is that a Primus 210 in your avatar?  Nice looking one.

HJ

10:32 a.m. on April 21, 2011 (EDT)
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Jim,

Thanks for the compliment. 

It's my first 00 Optimus; Worse than Crack Cocaine.   Instant addiction.The guy who sold it to me had thrown it in his attic, and never lit it. He was the original "angry young man", it seemed.

I keep it in a little wood box a friend made for it.  That's the picture from eBay, from whence I snagged it.

Al

7:06 a.m. on April 27, 2011 (EDT)
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9:16 a.m. on April 27, 2011 (EDT)
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I would say that a person's choice on stoves should be based upon their outdoor needs, price range, versatility, and the number of persons served by it. 

I have tried most stoves and each have pros and cons. Some - more cons than the rest. But, my preference is liquid fuel first, then gas. The Coleman fuel type I generally prefer first, then Alcohol, then canister. 

At the moment I have gone from Alcohol back to liquid gas, with the alcohol being a secondary.

I currently use the Brunton Bantam Liquid Stove (slightly modified for weight reduction) and back up with a chimney flame styled alcohol stove. 

4:51 a.m. on April 28, 2011 (EDT)
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..It's my first 00 Optimus; Worse than Crack Cocaine...

Indeed, the Double Zero and similar Optimus models are perhaps the most renown stoves on the planet, being the go-to stove over many generations for sailors, trekkers, and millions of kitchens in the third world.  The 00 is bomber; I'd still take it over any liquid fuel stove currently in production, regardless it does weigh more.

Ed

11:46 a.m. on April 28, 2011 (EDT)
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I think I have 7 if them (00s).  I won't go look, my wife might catch me.  ;)

12:53 a.m. on May 2, 2011 (EDT)
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I have a Manaslu which has a tank size like the old Primus 96 and the burner head from the bigger Primus 210. It is a really nice combination and works very well. The Manaslu is made in Japan and is really of very high quality. Oddly enough I had to order it out of the UK.

That said...I've got a 00 and the Primus 210 and Radius 21. I do like the Radius stoves pretty well too...very well made and very serviceable.

7:38 a.m. on May 2, 2011 (EDT)
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I've been toying  with the Idea of a Manaslu on and off for some time. Now I believe I'll go ahead and get one.  I very much appreciate the information.

Al

6:35 p.m. on May 2, 2011 (EDT)
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I've been toying  with the Idea of a Manaslu on and off for some time. Now I believe I'll go ahead and get one.  I very much appreciate the information.

Al

 Yes, I went down to my gear locker and checked. Mine is the Manaslu 96 and I did get it out of the UK from the guy who advertises on the spiritburner site. I've never found a US importer.

When you get the new stove, it makes sense to take and wash it out with some lacquer thinner mixed with ethyl acetate (both available at the local Home Depot).  Especially the burner head unit. Turns out there is some waxy flux that they used when they made mine that is volatile or soluble in kerosene and it had a tendency to plug the nipple on the stove after about 5 minutes.

It was only after it sputtered out every time after 5 minutes or so and I noticed the nipple plugging that I took the thing apart and then had to figure out what would dissolve the material. Plain kero did not do it but the ethyl acetate did. Make sure to rinse out all the ethyl acetate as the vapor pressure of this as a mixture is too high to run in the stove safely.

I run Clear Light Kero...I think they market this under a different name now but it was a semi-synthetic kero and burned real well and no kero smell.

Good luck..keep an eye out for Radius stoves too...good stuff.

9:41 a.m. on May 3, 2011 (EDT)
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I've got a 210 with a Radius burner.  Swedish army surplus mix and match.  I'll have to give it a whirl.

Thanks for the additional Manaslu information.

Al

1:25 a.m. on May 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Jim,

Thanks for the compliment. 

It's my first 00 Optimus; Worse than Crack Cocaine.   Instant addiction.The guy who sold it to me had thrown it in his attic, and never lit it. He was the original "angry young man", it seemed.

I keep it in a little wood box a friend made for it.  That's the picture from eBay, from whence I snagged it.

Al

 Looks like it's in truly fabulous condition.

HJ

1:27 a.m. on May 4, 2011 (EDT)
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I've been toying  with the Idea of a Manaslu on and off for some time. Now I believe I'll go ahead and get one.  I very much appreciate the information.

Al

 Yes, I went down to my gear locker and checked. Mine is the Manaslu 96 and I did get it out of the UK from the guy who advertises on the spiritburner site. I've never found a US importer.

When you get the new stove, it makes sense to take and wash it out with some lacquer thinner mixed with ethyl acetate (both available at the local Home Depot).  Especially the burner head unit. Turns out there is some waxy flux that they used when they made mine that is volatile or soluble in kerosene and it had a tendency to plug the nipple on the stove after about 5 minutes.

It was only after it sputtered out every time after 5 minutes or so and I noticed the nipple plugging that I took the thing apart and then had to figure out what would dissolve the material. Plain kero did not do it but the ethyl acetate did. Make sure to rinse out all the ethyl acetate as the vapor pressure of this as a mixture is too high to run in the stove safely.

I run Clear Light Kero...I think they market this under a different name now but it was a semi-synthetic kero and burned real well and no kero smell.

Good luck..keep an eye out for Radius stoves too...good stuff.

 Interesting!  I had no idea that any version of the 96 was still being made.  Is it a "lipstick" burner (no jet)?

HJ

8:43 a.m. on May 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Jim,

I believe there's a picture on Base-Camp's site. I has a roarer burner.    Still, a dandy looking little stove for a day hike.

Al

10:00 a.m. on May 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Yes it has the roarer burner and not the lipstick tube. Works like a charm and makes me wonder if I could Frankenstove my own out of a spare Radius burner head and 96 base.

11:23 a.m. on May 4, 2011 (EDT)
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You ought to be able to cobble something together, but you do have to worry about the additional heat feedback that a larger burner would put out.  I'm sure that if you went over to CCS you'd find someone who has done it.

HJ

12:59 p.m. on May 5, 2011 (EDT)
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Actually I have a Frankenstove using a Brit stove tank base (Parasene) mated with a Radius roarer burner that is bomber for winter. Never had a issue with heat feedback, probably because I use it more in the winter, but that is a good point to keep in mind.

I used to post on CCS about 8 years ago but got so busy banging nails at my cabin that I had little time for any other diversion. Just used my toys then put them away after cleaning. CCS is a great site and Ross has done everyone a service by keeping with it.

4:41 p.m. on May 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey, Just thought I'd chime in. Of cource it depends what your needs are in a stove: weight, cost, complexity, field maint, color ;-}>. There are a ton, and I mean a ton of used stoves out there that all have years and years of long time feedback. Rather than buy a new on you could buy a used one on the cheap (as long as it's not a collectors item). This has a couple of advantages, you will get a lot of help & advice on uesd stoves on this (and other) forum (s) and you will help the planet by recyling and not using up new resources in making yet another stove. I just ran into a Svea 8R and it's a great little stove. The camping versions are going for $20-$30 on ebay and they don't seem to be near as finicky as other stoves. Gosh, I never new that some stoves came whtithe simmer option. I haven't used mine in the field yet buy just trying it at home has conviced me there are better options than my current MSR's. It's amazing what good gear gets left in the dust as new products come out. Good thing cause I've only bought one new piece of gear in the last 15 years. Here's a pict of my pup Mogh, guarding the cooking Ramen and making sure that the 8R is operating af full efficiently, though momentarily distracted by the sheep.
DSC03737-2-.jpg

5:33 p.m. on May 10, 2011 (EDT)
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That set up looks like a Sigg Tourist set up for a Svea 123 (or 123R).  Optimus made an 8R but Svea did not.  The 8R was in a lozenge shaped case.  There was also a Primus 8R for a brief period after Optimus bought the Primus name for liquid fueled stoves.

Can you read the engraving on the fuel tank?

HJ

2:23 a.m. on May 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Hi, Yea It is a Sigg Tourist w/ 123. I've been looking at a 8R, my mistake.

It is engraved as follows on the top:

MADE IN SWEDEN SVEA 123

BENZOLINE PETROL ESSENCE BENSIN

On the collar of the flame adjuster it reads:

MADE IN SWEDEN

12:57 p.m. on May 11, 2011 (EDT)
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OK, that's what I thought.  Thanks for checking.  Always curious about old stoves.  Might have been something I just wasn't aware of.

HJ

3:15 p.m. on May 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Us gear heads are a sentimental lot arent we.Wish I still had some of my old stoves and the like except I just wouldnt use most of them.I do like the newer stuff.Compact and light weight.Most are very reliable as well.If you take care of your gear it will take care of you.

7:22 p.m. on May 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Dunno.  My Svea 123 is still one of my "workhorse" stoves to this day.  For short trips, it can be just as light or lighter as something like a Whisperlite -- pretty good for a stove designed in the 50's.

No, not as light as a little upright canister gas stove, but much more stable, and WAY cheaper to operate.  A 100g gas canister?  About $5.00 each.  The same amount of Coleman fuel?  About $0.30.  'Nuf said.  :)

HJ

8:46 p.m. on May 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Just picked up a Brunton Vesta for $22.00. Does anybody know about these stoves?

10:44 p.m. on May 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Nice stoves.  A little on the heavy side, *but* -- and this is a big plus -- they can be run with the canister inverted which means you can easily run it down to 0F (if you get fuel that is only propane and isobutane, no "regular" butane). 

And, dude, $20?  For real?  SCORE!

HJ

4:45 p.m. on May 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I have always used alcohol stoves. 3 days 12 oz of fuel. I hear that I can be out for a week with 8 oz of butane. It rearly gets much colder than +20F here. So butane was the way to go. I think.

12:00 a.m. on May 30, 2011 (EDT)
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hikin_jim said:

Dunno.  My Svea 123 is still one of my "workhorse" stoves to this day.  For short trips, it can be just as light or lighter as something like a Whisperlite -- pretty good for a stove designed in the 50's.

No, not as light as a little upright canister gas stove, but much more stable, and WAY cheaper to operate.  A 100g gas canister?  About $5.00 each.  The same amount of Coleman fuel?  About $0.30.  'Nuf said.  :)

HJ

 ...a couple of years ago I took my Optimus 80 (just a newer variant of the old Primus 71) and the Sigg Tourist cook kit on a trip 9 day trip to the High Sierra. We spent most of the time camped above 12000 and I matched times to boil with his Whisperlite. He took a titanium pot and I took my Aluminum Sigg pots. We learned about relative heat transfer inefficiency properties of Ti vs Al on that trip. :-)

I did take a light piece of aluminum foil to use as an additional internal (to the Sigg Tourist windscreen) windscreen as I'd learned the hard way that our camps can be windy. Had to modify the screen a bit but the Primus 71/Optimus 80.  I think the taller stove is a more efficient height for the Sigg cook kit than either the Svea or the shorter version of the Primus 71.

9:07 a.m. on May 30, 2011 (EDT)
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If anyone is looking for a stove this guy is selling another one. It is a Brunton Vesta. Butane fuel. weighs 8.4 oz. legs fold flat. The reviews on it are very good. I just got one from him.

http://cgi.ebay.com/Brunton-butane-stove-backpacking-camping-hunting-/180673571036?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a10fbe8dc

At this price I dont think you could go wrong

7:08 p.m. on May 31, 2011 (EDT)
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Check this stove out.

9:23 p.m. on May 31, 2011 (EDT)
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Before he gets set up I'm half way to boil. Hope there is never any wind. Too much work for a simple stove.

1:53 a.m. on June 2, 2011 (EDT)
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...speaking of camp stoves. I'm going to sell a few of my duplicates in my collection.  Several kero burners like Radius and Optimus 00, a couple British ones, some Primus 71's (one never lit), and Optimus 8R's and Optimus 99. No Sveas except the Svea version of the Primus 210 that I'll probably keep.

I'll list them in the not to distant future but feel free to pm me if you want dibs on something before they get listed or ebayed.

1:53 a.m. on June 2, 2011 (EDT)
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...speaking of camp stoves. I'm going to sell a few of my duplicates in my collection.  Several kero burners like Radius and Optimus 00, a couple British ones, some Primus 71's (one never lit), and Optimus 8R's and Optimus 99. No Sveas except the Svea version of the Primus 210 that I'll probably keep.

I'll list them in the not to distant future but feel free to pm me if you want dibs on something before they get listed or ebayed.

8:14 a.m. on June 2, 2011 (EDT)
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Here is an interesting stove.  It's the only DUAL purpose stove I've seen.  It's heavy at 1lb 10oz but it's powered by wood so you don't have to carry any fuel, just something to start the fire with. Now for the cool part.  You can charge your cell phone or rechargeable LED light with it.

http://www.biolitestove.com/BioLite.html

The 60 second demo on youtube:

The full length demo:

Cool stove, a bit heavy compared to a canister stove, would be great if you were going to backpack without resupply.  Also make a great "camp fire" for those places you can't have one. Kids could roast marshmallows over it too.  The only other question I have is how big of a mess it would make in you pack.

3:45 p.m. on June 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Very interesting stove, computerguy - I read the web site and am impressed with this company.  From what I could tell their main product is a large stove for use by people off grid (primarily in underdeveloped countries).

As far as the camp stove is concerned, I would think the extra weight would be offset somewhat by not carrying liquid fuels.  They do make a lighter version at 15 oz, I wonder if the heat output is the same.  I didn't see where the camp stoves were able to charge electronic devices, I just saw that as a feature of the large stoves.  I believe that the camp stoves only use the electricity generated to power the fan.  I may be wrong though.

That being said, they are cool devices with interesting technology - and the company seems to have good intentions.  Too bad they're not available yet, I'd like to try one.  Maybe Trailspace could get on the waiting list and review one for us?  ;)

9:57 p.m. on June 3, 2011 (EDT)
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mikemorrow said:

I have always used alcohol stoves. 3 days 12 oz of fuel. I hear that I can be out for a week with 8 oz of butane. It rearly gets much colder than +20F here. So butane was the way to go. I think.

 I've done week long hikes with a 4 oz canister of gas.  Keep in mind though that the 4 oz is just the weight of the fuel.  The weight of the steel canister is not included in the the 4 oz (or 8 oz or 16 oz if you buy those sizes).

By the way, gas canisters typically don't contain just butane.  Usually canisters carry some blend of propane, butane, and isobutane.  For temperatures below 40F/5C, avoid butane.  MSR, Brunton, Snow Peak, and I believe Jetboil are all propane/isobutane mixes and do not contain "plain" butane; these brands are good down to about 20F.  You can go even lower if you follow some of the techniques listed in this article..   You can go colder still if you use the type of stove listed in this second article.  The good news is for anyone owning a Brunton Vesta is that the Vesta is the type of stove listed in the second article.  If you use a fuel blend that does not contain "plain" butane and you follow the technique outlined in the article, then you should easily be able to operate in temperatures down to 0F/-18C.

HJ

10:02 p.m. on June 3, 2011 (EDT)
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422 forum posts

Mazama said:

 ...a couple of years ago I took my Optimus 80 (just a newer variant of the old Primus 71) and the Sigg Tourist cook kit on a trip 9 day trip to the High Sierra. We spent most of the time camped above 12000 and I matched times to boil with his Whisperlite. He took a titanium pot and I took my Aluminum Sigg pots. We learned about relative heat transfer inefficiency properties of Ti vs Al on that trip. :-)

I did take a light piece of aluminum foil to use as an additional internal (to the Sigg Tourist windscreen) windscreen as I'd learned the hard way that our camps can be windy. Had to modify the screen a bit but the Primus 71/Optimus 80.  I think the taller stove is a more efficient height for the Sigg cook kit than either the Svea or the shorter version of the Primus 71.

 

Do you have a photo of that particular Primus 71 in the Sigg windscreen? The Primus 71, being taller than the Svea 123, seems like it wouldn't have enough clearance with the bottom of the pot.

HJ

10:22 p.m. on June 3, 2011 (EDT)
81 reviewer rep
422 forum posts

ocalacomputerguy said:

Here is an interesting stove.  It's the only DUAL purpose stove I've seen.  It's heavy at 1lb 10oz but it's powered by wood so you don't have to carry any fuel, just something to start the fire with. Now for the cool part.  You can charge your cell phone or rechargeable LED light with it.

http://www.biolitestove.com/BioLite.html

The 60 second demo on youtube:

Cool stove, a bit heavy compared to a canister stove, would be great if you were going to backpack without resupply.  Also make a great "camp fire" for those places you can't have one. Kids could roast marshmallows over it too.  The only other question I have is how big of a mess it would make in you pack.

 It does look interesting, doesn't it?  However, I've been watching their site for a couple of years.  They're still not ready for market.  There are a lot of problems with the thermoelectric units; they're fragile.  Making a thermoelectric unit that can stand up to the relatively rough use of backpacking and the like is no mean feat. 

I wish them luck, but it doesn't look like it'll be happening any time soon.  I hope I'm wrong.

HJ

9:48 a.m. on June 5, 2011 (EDT)
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910 forum posts

Here's an interesting "stove" I re-found (I had seen it just after they had gotten the first production run. It had already sold out). It's not really a stove it's a water boiler but that's the only thing a lot of people do with their stoves and if you want a cup of tea or coffee on a day hike this would be great also.

http://www.theboilerwerks.com/

8:06 p.m. on June 6, 2011 (EDT)
81 reviewer rep
422 forum posts

Those Backcountry Boilers are really fascinating, particularly since they're so light and compact.  Unfortunately, I live in Southern California which has so many wood fire restrictions that the BB wouldn't really be practical.  :(

HJ

3:55 p.m. on June 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Hi HJ,

Regarding your earlier post of 6/3....

Unfortunately I didn't take any pictures of this set up but when I get back down into the storage area to get a couple of other stoves out that I have listed for sale, I'll see if I can take some pictures or better yet  do some measurements from the base of the pan to the top of the burner head of the stoves.

Like I said, I have one of the shorter Svea 123 like Primus 71 that has never been lit that I might go ahead and use rather than sell it but for now one of my Radius 42's is working on this cookset while the Optimus 80 goes with the Stainless Sigg cookset and the Regular Primus 71 hangs out with the old school all Al Sigg cookset.

The modification involves cutting away a V shaped piece of the cookset windscreen so that the key and valve setting can be inserted and manipulated easily.

Mazama

8:39 p.m. on June 21, 2011 (EDT)
81 reviewer rep
422 forum posts

Mazama said:

I didn't take any pictures of this set up but when I get back down into the storage area...

 Any luck putting any photos together?

HJ

August 27, 2014
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