Compact Calories

3:28 p.m. on June 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Ray Jardine’s PCT Hiker’s Handbook proclaims that the most important part of trail nourishment is the spiritual/psychological component (what’s appetizing), which is easy to agree with, but also makes some dubious fact-claims such as that that tomatoes have more energy than meat.

1. What do you think about the psychological vs calories question?

2. What are your favorite compact/lightweight sources of energy on the trail?

I’m a bean-freak at home and a voracious oatmeal-eater too.  These both seem like good bets for the long-haul.  Disagree?

5:15 p.m. on June 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Oatmeal. Excellent if you are using some quick cooking variety. Available in single serving packets if you don't mind the instant type.

Beans..  except for lentils beans take a really long time to cook. The problem is fuel. You will spend a fortune in canister gas if you cook beans a lot. If you used an unleaded gas stove you would be all right if you could fill up often. (Somebody who uses an unleaded stove chime in here about fuel usage)

Also you would have to figure out how to pre-soak them while hiking. I have seen a thread around here about cooking them then dehydrating them. All you have to do then is boil some water and rehydrate.

Most people have some sort of trail mix they like and/or granola bars. Some people just munch on it all day and skip lunch.  

Remember you are probably going to be hungry at the end of the day. Food  is going to taste better. Some people go to extremes however check out this thread http://www.trailspace.com/forums/gear-selection/topics/91734.html.

6:05 p.m. on June 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Dried fruit.   Mangoes (dried) provide much nutrition, moderate calories.   I am eating dried apricots as I type this post.  Nuts provide excellent nutrition.

I get these at Trader Joe's.

Also, dried, smoked  herring, if you can find it.  Ample protein, but high in sodium, if that's a concern.

I do not prescribe to  the "psychological or spiritual" components / aspects.   Don't do granola bars, either.

Apparently, some folks spike their Kool-Aid.  Now, I read that they are frying it, too.

_____________________________________

     ~r2~

10:08 p.m. on June 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Fried Kool-Aid?! LOL!

Southern people will fry anything, but this I wanna watch. From a distance... say a 50 foot pole distance. I'm sure you could get a drunk redneck to pour some in a turkey fryer.

As for the psychological aspect your food should be something that doesn't detract from the experience. Ever go back to a restaurant that didn't serve anything you liked? If the food you eat while hiking is something that you don't like or just don't want to eat, you'll lose interest.  If it's something that you look forward to then it'll make the experience more enjoyable. I don't think it's something you need to worry about. Your best bet is to cook with what you'll have on the trail at home. DON'T try to learn how to cook on the trail. 

10:50 p.m. on June 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Yeah.   Fried Kool-Aid.

Google it.

Some dude, named "Chicken Charlie" Boghosian claims he invented it. Not a Southern redneck; but from San Diego, Calif.

~r2~

11:21 p.m. on June 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Darn it's Kool-Aid flavored dough balls. I was picturing some idiot pouring a gallon of Kool-Aid into a vat of 400 degree oil and Darwin taking over.

3:21 a.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Ray Jardine has thousands of miles of adventuring under his belt, so I wouldn't discount what he says. He is at the outer fringe of backpacking and is very opinionated, but he's got the track record to back up what he says, as far as I can tell. Never met the guy, but have visited his website, read about his adventures and read what others who do know him or bought gear from him have to say.

I think I understand what he is talking about- eat what makes you happy, but I also believe that calories are your friend.  Grand Tour bike racers (Giro, Tour de France, etc.) eat like 5-7000 calories a day; so does Michael Phelps when he is training.

Some people eat just Ramen because it is simple and light, but that isn't enough for me. I've gone out with frozen steaks and real potatoes, but I don't recommend that for long distance hikes.

There are a number of websites with recipes on them, so just Google for them and see what pops up.

5:33 a.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Personally, I like dried salami, and beef jerky with some cheese to go along with either.  Both have decent protein and provide necessary calories, though these are "quick-hits" which can be eaten with little/no trail prep while on the move.

I think that someone's mental state can affect how they feel after they eat a particular food.  Some foods may be loaded with nutrients and energy, but after eating does nothing to make you feel refueled.  While on the other hand food that may not be great for refueling can make you feel like you are ready to keep on keepin on. 

6:30 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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My favorite compact food is sun dried and basil polenta. Along with pre- cooked bacon. Bothe go great with bagels in the morning. Thats what I cook on canoe expeditions. Add eggs and them clie.ts come pouring out there tents to see what smells so good.

8:22 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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LOL at the fried kool aid balls.  I like it though.

I hadn't thought of polenta.

Ocalacocomputerguy: right, most beans take 24 hours of soaking and another good 6 hours of boiling.  But red lentils can be boiled from dry in about 20 minutes if you let them sit in the hot water afterward.  Still a bit of time, but manageable.

A little bacon for flavor is a good idea.

9:14 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I would seriously consider a liquid fuel stove. If you're going to boil something for 20 minutes or so you will go through canister gas pretty quickly.

Lentils and REAL salt cured ham would be good. No refrigeration needed.

6:39 a.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Good scotch and fine cognac.

The "psychological component" is note-worthy, as well.  Plus, it is "all-natural" and may be "organic".

~r2~

2:52 a.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Pemmican is about as dense of a calorie source as you can get, but it requires acclimating your stomach else you end up feeling ill.  It is also an acquired taste, one I have not managed to get comfortable with.   Salami, jerky and cheese are good treats, but heavy if intended as a significant source of fuel.  Hard candies good for dense calories, I use them for hill climbing fuel.  Whisky has some good calories too, and is a fine repast for the soul!

Ed

12:32 p.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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marienbad said:

Ray Jardine’s PCT Hiker’s Handbook proclaims that the most important part of trail nourishment is the spiritual/psychological component (what’s appetizing), which is easy to agree with, but also makes some dubious fact-claims such as that that tomatoes have more energy than meat.

1. What do you think about the psychological vs calories question?

2. What are your favorite compact/lightweight sources of energy on the trail?

I’m a bean-freak at home and a voracious oatmeal-eater too.  These both seem like good bets for the long-haul.  Disagree?

 The moment I read something that has anything that I know or to unclear and dubious I immediately consider that there are many other inaccuracies and discredit the rest and previous written.

Calories is what gives you go.

I love eating the many flavors of "Kind" bars.

I too like taking the instant oatmeal on trips.  Just as much as oatmeal needs boiling water I change it up with Freeze-dried meals and jerky and dried fruit & nut with chocolate drops trail mixes.  Good energy with all that.

10:47 a.m. on June 29, 2011 (EDT)
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Beans provide various / many benefits, as well as liabilities.

I understand that is why there will never be a Mexican aboard the Space Station.

BTW, folks -- I seldom do euphemisms.

_____________________________________

~r2~

1:40 p.m. on July 1, 2011 (EDT)
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No Mexican on space station?

Our very own home town astronaut,

Matter of fact, in an article in our (Stockton) The Record, he mentioned that he shared tortilla and He also showed what he said were freeze-dried tacos, ready to go into orbit.

JOSÉ M. HERNÁNDEZ
NASA ASTRONAUT

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE:  STS-128 Discovery (August 28 to September 11, 2009) was the 128th Shuttle mission and the 30th mission to the International Space Station.  While at the orbital outpost, the STS-128 crew rotated an expedition crewmember, attached the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), and transferred over 18,000 pounds of supplies and equipment to the station.  The STS-128 crew conducted three spacewalks.  The STS-128 mission was accomplished in 217 orbits of the Earth, traveling over 5.7 million miles in 332 hours and 53 minutes and returned to land at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

 

Shelf Stable Tortillas

Flour tortillas are a favorite bread item of the Shuttle astronauts. Tortillas provide an easy and acceptable solution to the bread crumb and microgravity handling problem, and have been used on most Shuttle missions since 1985. However, mold is a problem with commercially packaged tortillas, especially with the longer missions on the orbiter, which has no refrigeration.

A shelf stable tortilla was developed for use on the Shuttle with extended mission lengths. The tortillas are stabilized by a combination of modified atmosphere packaging, pH (acidity), and water activity. Mold growth is inhibited by removing the oxygen from the package. This is accomplished by packaging in a high-barrier container in a nitrogen atmosphere with an oxygen scavenger. Water activity is reduced to less than 0.90 in the final product by dough formulation. This reduced water activity, along with a lower pH, inhibits growth of pathogenic clostridia, which could be a potential hazard in the anaerobic atmosphere created by the modified atmosphere.

The two astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are eagerly anticipating the arrival of NASA's space shuttle Discovery and their first human visitors in more than two months.

ISS Expedition 11 commander Sergei Krikalev and flight engineer John Phillips said they look forward to nightly dinners with Discovery's STS-114 astronauts, and are planning something special to welcome the shuttle crew aboard.

"If I told you now, it wouldn't be a surprise," Phillips told reporters Friday during a space-to-ground news conference. "But I do have a surprise for them."

Discovery's STS-114 mission, commanded by veteran astronaut Eileen Collins, is slated to launch on July 13 at 3:51 p.m. EDT (1951 GMT) and dock at the ISS two days later. In addition to testing out new orbital tools and procedures to inspect and repair space shuttles, Collins and her crewmates will deliver a cargo pod full of much-needed supplies, experiments and replacement parts to the ISS.

"I'm looking forward to seeing my colleagues up here, and seeing another seven faces," Phillips said, adding that he has been collecting his supply of Mexican food for a theme dinner with the shuttle astronauts.

5:31 p.m. on July 1, 2011 (EDT)
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Invokes visions of the movie, "Blazing Saddles" ... when all the cowpokes were gathered around the chuck-wagen, eating dishes of beans.

I can just picture the nine astronauts "dueling" with emissions.   I suppose (?) there are top-notch, state-of-the-art, carbon canister,  air-filtering devices at the ready.  For their sake, I hope they weren't made in China.

_____________________________________________

~r2~

8:41 a.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
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Tortillas pack well in the backpack. I like tortillas.

There are freeze-dried beans available, processed beans are "safe".

I especially like Tasty Bite indian cuisine pouches. The hot food is very acceptable eaten cold, wrapped in a tortilla.

If I carry cheese, I carry baby bon bel.

I like fig bars much better than any "granola bar" made.

I like to munch freeze-dried raspberries, also dried pears.

This is "good for me" (keeps me regular) and increases my water consumption, which is "a good thing" because it is important to keep well-hydrated in the high mountains.

A lightweight and compact food item is couscous. It is a lot like rice, in that it absorbs flavors from the other ingredients. It is fast cooking: 10 seconds in hot water.

Couscous can become a main entree, or a dessert.

That said, I also like to carry Thai lime rice pouches from Trader Joe's. I add a vacuum packed alder-smoked salmon packet and True Lime and a sugar packet for limeade.

If there is a MacDonald's enroute to the trailhead, I get individually wrapped sausage biscuits one for each breakfast. I put them in an odor-proof Opsak, because I am in grizzly bear country, here, in Montana.

Otherwise, gourmet cocoa packets or Starbucks VIA Columbia Medium instant coffee packets are in my backpack.

http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/ has lightweight alcohol stoves that burn 20 minutes, or more. There is much discussion at bplite forum about baking over an alcohol stove.

In fact, we talk about food and food preparation, a lot.

http://www.trailcooking.com/ is a resource.

I find that "freezer bag cooking" is an excellent way to put together good meals for hiking and backpacking.

I like eating well.

If a day-hike, I take a deli sandwich (no mayonaise) for the first lunch.

If a longer backpacking trip, I will take a frozen steak. When it thaws out, it is time to eat steak. I usually cut it in strips before cooking because it usually gets wrapped in a tortilla. I use spicy rice pouches for my carne asada tortillas.

There are hikers who take home-dehydrated lean hamburger, referred to as "gravel". It is important to get the fat out for this to be successful.

I hike where it is cold, at least at night: I need fat.

If I do not have sufficient fat in the food itself, I add a packet of olive oil.

I also carry a Snickers bar, for a nighttime snack, to "kick in" my central heating system (the fire of digestion is warming). If cold, I find a Snickers bar and a couple of sips of water works for me.

8:54 p.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacumputerguy said:  

Beans..  except for lentils beans take a really long time to cook. The problem is fuel. You will spend a fortune in canister gas if you cook beans a lot. If you used an unleaded gas stove you would be all right if you could fill up often. (Somebody who uses an unleaded stove chime in here about fuel usage)

Beans can be dehydrated before the trip. I precook beans and rice, then dry them out, laid on a cloth (absorbs moisture faster) and then put into Ziploc bags. Then add to boiling water to rehydrate in the field.

I also make and dry my own pasta for use in the field.

6:32 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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Cabbage and bean burritos are BANNED, in any case.

                                                  ~r2~

7:39 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I have never had success with dehydrating pasta or beans.

I purchase Mountain House Pro Pak Lasagna with Meat.

I purchase beans from PackItGourmet online store.

I also have purchased dehydrated cabbage from PackIt Gourmet I have added to packaged dehydrated mashed potatos from the grocery store.

9:39 a.m. on July 23, 2011 (EDT)
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ConnieD said:

Tortillas pack well in the backpack. I like tortillas.

There are freeze-dried beans available, processed beans are "safe".

I especially like Tasty Bite indian cuisine pouches. The hot food is very acceptable eaten cold, wrapped in a tortilla.

If I carry cheese, I carry baby bon bel.

I like fig bars much better than any "granola bar" made.

I like to munch freeze-dried raspberries, also dried pears.

 works for me.

 Before a trip I like to make several homemade burritos using whole wheat flour tortillas and wrapped around cooked brown rice, eggless mayo, fried tofu, hummus, sliced tomato and maybe a pickle or two.  Dang good.  One time I took out two Giant Burritos using those tortillas that are green or reddish and about thirty inches in diameter.  A hearty meal.

As far as beans go, Mary Jane's Farm has some very good organic dehydrated black beans which can be bought in bulk.

Of course, I'm a big proponent of the Tasty Bite meals---Jodhpur Lentils being my favorite.

And I also love my dried mangos from a place in California---online ordered.

10:05 a.m. on July 24, 2011 (EDT)
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I don't get any satisfying nourishment from tofu, even fried.

I like fried tempeh. I don't see that sold around here.

I like dried mangos if not completely dry and more like the Turkish apricots.

Where do you find them?

10:13 a.m. on July 24, 2011 (EDT)
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You'll hate the prices but here's my source for dried mangos:(they're around $13 a pound)

http://www.livingtreecommunity.com/

As far as tofu goes, you may like the Wildwood baked tofu which can be found at certain grocery stores and which packs well on long backpacking trips.  I fried up strips of it and add it to my Tasty Bite meals.

9:29 a.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Trader Joe's ... if you have one in your area.

There is one near where I live --  Annapolis, MD -- and it is conveniently located two blocks from Hudson Trail Outfitters ... and about 1/2 mile from a Whole Foods (and that store is right next to an EMS store).

Lucky me !

                                                      ~r2~

12:30 p.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I sent Trader Joe's an email, asking them to put in at least a "seasonal store" in Cut Bank, Montana from the east near Glacier National Park, Montana.

There is store space there they could buy or lease.

I miss all their specialized food items, which are so ideal for backpacking.

Oh. If you see, fu try it. It is wheat gluten, flavored like duck, pork, beef, whatever. I first had it at a famous chinese vegetarian restaurant in San Francisco, CA.

I am not really a vegetarian. I like many different kinds of food.

Trader Joe's has meatless "chicken strips" and meatless "beef strips" that are strips of flavored wheat gluten.

They are supposed to be "shelf stable" up to 40-days without refrigeration.

Whole Foods has an "awesome" deli: a favorite, for backpacking, is a spicy garbanzo bean tortilla wrap.

It is "warming" eaten cold.

2:28 p.m. on July 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Good Luck.

Trader Joe's "advanced marketing / location" reps are notorious for being very highly selective regarding where they open a store.

They just moved into a store (their first) in the city of Charlottesville, Virginia ... my former residence.

Ironically, the store they moved INTO is the store Whole Foods just moved OUT of.   Whole Foods moved about 1/2 mile along Rte 29 into new, larger digs.

I've been a vegetarian since the BiCentennial ( 1976, for the history challenged).

Trust me ... the faux meat offerings have zero appeal to vegetarians.

Why would we want to be reminded of how carnage tastes?

We are, for-the-most-part, "recovering carnivores".

These so-called "meatless" chicken-strips and beef-strips might be OK for someone in the process of DELIBERATING the decision to stop eating meat.  Or, some gonzo hiker / backpacker that absolutely needs a "meat fix", absent the real thing.

"Carobs anyone?   We're out of chocolate".

"Velvetta (made in a factory), anyone?   We're out of the Pecorino Romano and Locatelli".

Whole Foods DOES have a wonderful deli.   But, PRICEY !   Recently had salads with a friend.   The tariff?   25 American Dollars ! ($25).   (Not pesos, nor euros).  Two modest-sized salads.

Trader Joe's and Whole Foods are great "people watching" places, though.   Lotsa women with no make-up, long hair parted down the center, "prairie dresses", no bras, Birkenstocks. ...   Lotsa men with bad hair, facial-hair,  untrimmed nose-hair, tie-dyed T-shirts (Grateful Dead inspired), bad shapes, misc brand sandals ("Earth Shoes"?), John Lennon-inspired spectacles.   SSS.   (Seriously Stuck in the Sixties ... or Seventies).

Probably almost everyone in the stores are Democrats ... looking for Ewell Gibbons.   Parking lots filled with Subaru and Volvo station-wagons with 'Hillary' or "Al Gore" or "Obama" ("CHANGE")   bumper-stickers, Tacoma roof-racks with day-glo little kayaks.   Maybe there's a "group hug" or "kumbaya party" scheduled?

Saw Sissy Spacek and John Grisham (locals) in Whole Foods in C'Ville.

Interesting places.    I derive ENTERTAINMENT (see above) from the stores.   Annapolis stores somewhat similar ... but, different.  

                                               ~r2~

9:57 a.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Apt description.

Nevertheless, I appreciate having the option of something more than "meat and potatoes" when I pay to eat-out.

I understand the "ready-to-eat" food at the Whole Foods store is sold by weight.

I never paid more than $8-$10 for a satisfying meal of entirely fresh food at the Whole Foods store in Tualatin, Oregon.

I don't get enough fresh food while backpacking, so I "refill" when I am in town.

I have had some excellent meals at the Whole Foods store.

I only mentioned the "Meatless Chicken Strips" and "Meatless Beef Strips" as backpacking food.

I saute it and wrap it in a tortilla.

I didn't know this was a vegetarian-topic.

Compact calories?

I used to see compressed Mincemeat, sold in a small package, in grocery stores. For a while, it was in my backpack as part of my "emergency food".

I have the teeth structure of an omnivore, not of a carnivore.

I do not let "some ideal" other than health determine my food choices.

That said, I want taste and texture from backpacking food.

I had a Hindu-monk, a consultant for vegetarians, tell me I need "wild meat" after he saw me after a vacation to Montana, and having had grilled elk steaks and grilled venison heart. I also like buffalo ribs, roasted in an oven-bag to retain the fat.

I derive the most energy from the "Highly beneficial" food items, supplemented by "Neutral" food items based on the book: Eating for your Blood Type.

That Hindu-monk printed the chapter from that book, for me.

Ironic? I don't know.

The fact is, I have the best energy "by weight" for backpacking by choosing from those food lists.

I also select food items by food items listed in Ayurveda for "my constitution" for my optimum health.

I have more well-being, more energy, more endurance, and more strength than most.

That is my criteria.

11:10 a.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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ConnieD said:

I didn't know this was a vegetarian-topic.

 It isn't.

As for the original query:

-for snacking I really like dried fruits, nuts, and granola. Blueberries, figs, and Mango are may favorite died fruits.

 -For breakfast I love oatmeal by itself, or with some cured bacon heated in a pan- high fat, hig salt goodness for the trail :)

-For lunches or quicker meals I like cheese, bread, pepperoni, individually pre-packaged and seasoned chicken or fish, as well as other snack trail foods.

-I usually do a prepared meal for dinner. I like to cook on the trail, so I often bring real foods- veggies, meats, pasta, etc. For going lighter and quicker I like dehydrated and freeze dried foods and premade meals. There are many different brands and options.

2:37 p.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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baked beans - can eat them cold if you want, quick cook time. good protein, carbs, low fat - perfect food.

 

I also take pre-cooked chicken, bacon, and pepporoni. Throw them in with the beans. mmmmmmm.

 

Also I really don't mind most of the backpackers pantry or mountain house meals, and those are around 400 calories per serving and weigh almost nothing.

 

lastly, honey is one of the quickest acting energy foods you can eat. It absorbs VERY quickly in your stomach providing fast, simple sugars for energy.

9:38 p.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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ConnieD said:


I derive the most energy from the "Highly beneficial" food items, supplemented by "Neutral" food items based on the book: Eating for your Blood Type.

That Hindu-monk printed the chapter from that book, for me.

 

TERRIBLE book.   If I could get my $24.95 back from the author, "Dr." Peter J. D'Adamo, I would.

A colleague, another Yoga instructor ( I am one ) recommended I read it.   She is NOT in-shape, herself ... and I was dubious.  Matter-of-fact, she is overweight.  

 I bought the book.   Other peers have shared my sentiments ... even more-so.

I am NOT a certified dietician.   HOWEVER; I have studied (at collegiate level) nutrition.

By-the-way, did I mention it was a TERRIBLE book?

                                                   ~r2~

9:41 p.m. on July 26, 2011 (EDT)
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ConnieD said:

I didn't know this was a vegetarian-topic.

 It isn't.

But the statements were relevant.

You will learn that topics DO stray-off on tangents ... but, tend to return to the central subject.

                                                   ~r2~

8:36 a.m. on July 27, 2011 (EDT)
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I am glad I didn't purchase the book, but he wasn't selling books.

I have found more information about it online.

In college, I was the weekend special diet cook at Children's Orthopedic Hospital, Seattle, Washington. There were full time Registered Dieticians helping me.

I think the premise of the book is it is about mild allergic reaction.

I found that the food item lists are good, when I stopped selecting food items on the "Foods to Avoid" list for me.

I noticed the difference, and so, I tried "Highly Beneficial" and "Neutral".

I never paid for the lab tests offered. I only used my blood type O.

6:23 a.m. on July 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Well ....

Yes  --  I will have to agree with you on those points.

I am also a Type 0 (Pos).   I had already learned of the "Avoids", which have been published in many other diet guidlines.   I also bought the little supplement / pamphlet specific for Type-0's.

Now -- If I can only learn to stop eating chocolate-chip cookies!

Oh, well ....

                                           ~r2~

3:38 p.m. on July 31, 2011 (EDT)
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On the topic of compact calories, one thing I "struggle" with is lunches while on the trail backpacking.  I've tried taking flat breads for my old standby PB&J, but the PB&J don't pack well either in those little tubes, or the baggie method (they get messy, and the last thing I want is jelly on my gear when I'm out in bear country).

I've mostly settled on dense food bars - like this one specifically:  http://www.rei.com/product/519135/bear-valley-pemmican-bar

They taste OK, seem to be filling, provide about 400 calories each, and seem to give me reasonable energy.  They are heavy but small & they pack OK in the bear canister.

 

 

7:08 p.m. on July 31, 2011 (EDT)
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bneiser1 said:

On the topic of compact calories, one thing I "struggle" with is lunches while on the trail backpacking.  I've tried taking flat breads for my old standby PB&J, but the PB&J don't pack well either in those little tubes, or the baggie method (they get messy, and the last thing I want is jelly on my gear when I'm out in bear country).

 

Why not just carry the jam/jelly in an ex-peanut butter plastic jar. I wash out the peanut butter jars when I eat all the spread and use them for carrying other things. They are waterproof and leakproof. You can usually find small peanut butter jars. They do not weigh much more empty than a Gerrytube or whatever they call the refillable tubes today.

Soak the empty PB jars label in hot water for a few minutes to get it off easily. Use a nylon scrubby to help loosen the label if it doesn't come off readily.

I carry crackers, cheese and sardines for my midday meals/lunches. The xPB jars will hold quite a few Ritz crackers too. I use them for seasonings, nuts, GORP, etc.

10:19 p.m. on August 1, 2011 (EDT)
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I like Justin brand peanut butter packets for a lunch-on-the-go.

My favorite is Maple Almond or Chocolate Hazlenut.

I have Turkish apricots with it and I consume a lot of water.

Other than that, I prefer hot soup for lunch ( taking a short break to prepare the hot water) followed by fancy crackers and Baby Bon Bel cheese and I consume a lot of water.

I eat my main meal later in the afternoon, and then look for the campsite and prepare a hot drink (either a soup packet or a hot chai packet). I set up the gravity water filter to run all night. Then, I sleep or look at the stars.

Breakfast is my primary meal, either grits or oatmeal, or, a more elaborate meal of a baked muffin and hot chai. If hungry, I have a MacDonald's Sausage Biscuit and a Starbucks VIA Columbia Medium coffee.

wheat, sausage, coffee are on the foods to avoid list, for me.

That said, I don't "give up" something for a hike.

My favorite main meals are vacuum packed alder smoked salmon, a prepared packet of Thai lime rice, and asparagus or MTR Mixed Veg Curry and a prepared rice packet, and either tamarindo sauce or a Thai green curry sauce. I can happily consume this food hot or cold.

I remove the outer packaging and so I consider this reasonably lightweight and compact food.

I use an odorproof Opsak for the food and one more Opsak as a garbage sack for the left-over plastic wrappers.

I pack it in - I pack it out.

7:58 a.m. on August 2, 2011 (EDT)
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I see you're observing "Dr." D'Adamo's blood-type 0 "AVOID" list.

I mean COFFEE ?   Gimme-a-break.

I don't blame you for 'cheating' a little, with the VIA.

[ Disclaimer:  I just brewed a cup-0-'joe,  using FRESH roasted organic beans, brought to me by a guy that lived in the same village I lived in (Sag Harbor, Long Island) ... and brewed the 'pour-over method', using the Trailspace approved H2JOE kit ... actually, a "half-caf".   Mmmmm ..... ]

Life is too short to be deprived of "little blessings" ....

Although, I DO like chai and tea ... nothing "does it" quite like coffee in the morning.  

Hmmm ....   Now that I think of it, I recall a girl-friend that was a real "morning girl".   But, that's a totally different subject.

                                                     ~r2~

12:22 p.m. on August 3, 2011 (EDT)
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I posted about coffee, because I don't think a person should do their food experiments on the trail. Do them at home, because you will have headaches for a few days up to two weeks after stopping coffee.

I was just being honest.

It is no fun having caffeine withdrawal headaches at home. It ruins the hike, if done on a hike in the backcountry.

Oops, no calories in coffee... I have heard some people take chocolate covered coffee beans (compact and lightweight).

There are calories in chocolate covered coffee beans.

There are calories in chai.

I also like hot cocoa, for the creamy goodness and for the calories and for the caffeine.

All that, except for the periods of time I am off the coffee habit.

At those times, I have better rest and improved energy.

One would think I would stay off the coffee habit.

Then, I have memories of the odor of coffee in the morning.

Maybe I should just "smell the coffee"...?

12:43 p.m. on August 3, 2011 (EDT)
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As long as there is good food, I'm happy!

I like the Thousand Calorie Cookies from the NOLS Cookery.. if someone wants the recipe, i'll put it up! but as of right now its stuffed in my rock climbing bag, which I managed to misplace!

I also like to put the good stuff in my Hot Cocoa,

-Butter

-Peanut Butter

-dehyrdated milk (apparently mexican grocery stores have the best dehydrated milk because it has the most fat (i suppose you could order some really fat, or high calories dehydrated milk offline!))

-some vanilla

-and some brown sugar!

You must put all of those in there, or it just wont be the same...

1:16 p.m. on August 3, 2011 (EDT)
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ConnieD said:

I posted about coffee, because I don't think a person should do their food experiments on the trail. Do them at home, because you will have headaches for a few days up to two weeks after stopping coffee.

I was just being honest.

It is no fun having caffeine withdrawal headaches at home. It ruins the hike, if done on a hike in the backcountry.

Oops, no calories in coffee... I have heard some people take chocolate covered coffee beans (compact and lightweight).

There are calories in chocolate covered coffee beans.

There are calories in chai.

I also like hot cocoa, for the creamy goodness and for the calories and for the caffeine.

All that, except for the periods of time I am off the coffee habit.

At those times, I have better rest and improved energy.

One would think I would stay off the coffee habit.

Then, I have memories of the odor of coffee in the morning.

Maybe I should just "smell the coffee"...?

 

I have found unsweetened CAROB-covered coffee beans at Whole Foods, but, I haven't seen them lately.   Could be discontinued

I think (?) they still stock unsweetened CAROB-covered raisins, though.

Yummm !

                                                 ~r2~

8:35 p.m. on August 3, 2011 (EDT)
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ConnieD said:

Tortillas pack well in the backpack. I like tortillas.

I prefer bagels as my trail bread/flour source.  Get bake shop bagels, however, the factory ones lack soul.  Not very dense, but tolerates well the beating and temperature extremes.  Available in multiple flavors means you can tailor for the components you put on the bagel.  Yum, Gallo salami and provolone cheese, on a jalapeño bagel.  Good argument to bring a good cab.

Robert Rowe said:

Good scotch and fine cognac...

 You forgot fine chocolate!  It goes great with these two items.

Ed

9:35 p.m. on August 3, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

Robert Rowe said:

Good scotch and fine cognac...

 You forgot fine chocolate!  It goes great with these two items.

Ed

   You, know, Ed ... you're right.

I thought I was "weird" or something.  At least my friends have said that, upon seeing me popping some dark Ghirardelli choc and quaffing a little DeWar's  (straight, mind you).

As "Mr. T" says, "I pity the fool!".

                                                       ~r2~

10:29 a.m. on August 4, 2011 (EDT)
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MikeyBob365,

Many people like Nido Instant Whole Milk Powder.

I like Nature's First Full Cream Milk Powder from PackitGourmet.

Here is the link:

http://www.packitgourmet.com/General-Grocery-c14.html

9:05 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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ConnieD said:

MikeyBob365,

Many people like Nido Instant Whole Milk Powder.

I like Nature's First Full Cream Milk Powder from PackitGourmet.

Here is the link:

http://www.packitgourmet.com/General-Grocery-c14.html

 Thanks ConnieD!

I'm about to be a poor and irresponsible college kid! And my mother and I can't count how many times I've left the milk out when going for some late night oreos! So I think I may transition to Instant Milk in order to keep from spoiling jug after jug!

My roommates will probably think I'm one weird kid!

9:25 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Anyone ever tried this guy's products?

http://hawkvittles.com/index.html

11:12 p.m. on August 13, 2011 (EDT)
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marienbad said:

Ray Jardine’s PCT Hiker’s Handbook proclaims that the most important part of trail nourishment is the spiritual/psychological component (what’s appetizing), which is easy to agree with, but also makes some dubious fact-claims such as that that tomatoes have more energy than meat.

1. What do you think about the psychological vs calories question?

2. What are your favorite compact/lightweight sources of energy on the trail?

I’m a bean-freak at home and a voracious oatmeal-eater too.  These both seem like good bets for the long-haul.  Disagree?

1. most of my freak value comes from the knowledge the food is good for the purpose, so calorie count counts big on the freak out value.

2. not necessarily the lightest but my likes are,

  Tropical Trail Mix, Yosemite Trail Mix,

  Odwalla Bar, Pro Bar (delicious), Kind Bar, Sesame Snaps

  Pacific Gold Jerky,

  Instant Oatmeal,

  Mini Ravioli, Sun Dried Tomatoes,

  Freeze Dried

  Pancakes (add water only)

  Coffee and creamers

First meal is usually lunch which will be a pita pocket pre made,

Second meal - dinner, steak plus pasta,

Third - breakfast,  bacon - eggs - pancakes

11:42 p.m. on August 13, 2011 (EDT)
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oruacat2 said:

Anyone ever tried this guy's products?

http://hawkvittles.com/index.html

 I have it on good authority ( Sean Emory) that they are very tasty, I haven't tried them myself but am planning on ordering some to try.

12:59 p.m. on August 14, 2011 (EDT)
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After you try it, tell us all about it.

3:33 p.m. on August 14, 2011 (EDT)
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ConnieD said:

After you try it, tell us all about it.

 That will be this fall, but I will do my best to remember to.

I visited your site Connie, very good info, great links, and I especially like your gear list.

Keep it up, your info is great.

In the mean time, here is a video review on Hawk Vittles by Sean Emory - North African Stew Meal:

November 25, 2014
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