Jetboil 1.5 L pot + MSR Pocket Rocket

5:27 a.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Hi, 

I like the MSR Pocket Rocket but I'm having trouble choosing a decent pot. I like the Jetboil 1.5 L pot though, but I am uncertain how effective it'd be with the MSR Pocket Rocket stove.

10:59 a.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I use a 1 quart MSR Stowaway cookpot on my Pocket Rocket. Its only about 5-6 inches wide so it fits very well on the top of the poy holder arms of the pocket rocket. And the pocket rocket in its red triangular case, a Bic lighter,a nylong pot scrubber and my spoon all fit inside the one quart pot which also has a sealable lid to hold everything in place.


msr_stowaway_pot_775ml__p1__2.jpg


MSR-Stowaway-Pot-1100ml.jpg

The Stowaway pot comes in other sizes too.
I have had both my stove and cookpot since 2002. I like the simple screw-on fuel canisters.

6:29 p.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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To me, a 1.5 L pot is a bit big for a Pocket Rocket.  I think that a 1.5 L pot would be "tippy" up on top of a PR and that you'd risk losing your dinner.

I myself might go with a pot of about 1L in size -- or go with a different stove.

HJ

7:29 p.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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My 1.1L pot from my GSI Soloist works fine. I personally do not know if going any bigger would be a good idea based on the size of the pot holder arms on the Rocket.

7:57 p.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Taller, narrower (diameter) pots seem to work well.   As stated here, the arms don't extend very far.

The little burner is quite a reliable unit, in my experience.

                                             ~r2~

12:54 a.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I have had great results with the little rocket. Here is a pic with the GSI 1.1L on it. The date is screwed up on the pic. It was shot a few weeks back from my LHHT trip.


033.jpg

5:09 a.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks for all the replies! I'm rethinking my pot choice now and am looking for a tall pot instead.

I almost dropped the MSR Pocket Rocket for an Etapack lite from Primus instead, but I might just stick with the Pocket Rocket.

1:33 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm actually not that hot on the Pocket Rocket (yes, I know it's super popular).  I find that the arms on the PR are easily bent and that pots aren't all that stable atop it.  I prefer the Snow Peak GS-100 which sits a little lower and has much stronger pot supports. 

The Eta Pack light looks like a nice stove although it wouldn't be as light and compact as the PR.  Of course, if you need a 1.5 L pot, then the Pack Light looks like a better choice.

HJ

1:53 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I am kinda curious about the whole pot support bending thing.

I have never encountered this with the PR or any other stove for the past 25+yrs I've been doing this.

How would this happen? Stepping on it with the supports folded out? With my size 12 hoofs I don't see much that would survive a curb stomp from my Scarpas.

Maybe throwing it into a gorge?

I just don't get how this could logically happen. Especially if ya use a lil common sense, take care of it, and keep it in its case.

Then again there is the method of grabbing one of the supports with your fingers and bending it just to see how much it actually takes and that can weaken the metal.

The stove is designed to take weight vertically from where a pot will generate downward pressure due to the weight of the pot as well as its contents. I personally do not think the horizontal strength should be considered at all unless you are doing something with it other than its intended use.

Am I missing something here? The only way I could see this happening is either by misuse or putting a pot on it that was intended to be used with a "dutch oven."

...and if one posesses that much of a lack of common sense they probably should have not gotten out of their vehicle at the trailhead.

I personally do not feel this is an issue at all. Then again if you are cooking a meal in a tree above rocks and ya tip it over and it falls this may be a concern for ya.

Sorry HJ, I just think this is a silly knock for a solid product. Just my 2 cents.

Nevertheless, we are entitled to opinions as others may completely disagree with mine.

Like I stated in a previous thread... "99% of the time I have no idea of what I am doing, I just fake it well." ;)

10:15 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I've used a 1.5 on the superfly with good results. HJ- whats your opinion on the superfly? I assume its much the same as the PR? I just looked up the snow peaks, looks like a nice stove and a good backing from the company, "If you own it, it's covered!"

10:50 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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@Rick:  I wouldn't say that the PR is a bad stove.  I would say that I prerfer the GS-100 (or the Ti version, GST-100).  I like that the GS-100 sits a little lower, which makes it easier to shield from wind.  I like that the GS-100 holds a pot a bit better than the PR.  I like that the GS-100's pot supports are really solid.

With regard to the PR's pot supports, you're absolutely right:  They will not bend under normal use.  However, they are a little flimsy, and they are vulnerable where the pot support meets the burner column.  I have in fact seen them bend at that point when a stove got knocked over by accident.  Again, though, the PR is not a bad stove; I just prefer the GS-100.  The pot supports on a PR will not bend under normal use.

@Jake:  I like the Superfly actually although I think it has its drawbacks.  On the plus side, it's got a very big burner head which distributes the flame well which means (generally) better cooking.  The fact that the burner mounts to the lip of the canister instead of screwing on means that you'll never wear out the threads or cross thread your burner.  It's also nice that the S'Fly can use either threaded or non-threaded canisters (so long as they have a Lindal valve and a proper lip to mount the burner on). 

On the negative side, the darned pot supports, while very solid and capable of supporting a good sized pot, are pointy as all get out.  The darned pot supports tend to poke their way through the side of the stuff sack.   The stove also sits kind of high which makes it more difficult to shield from wind.

Overall, I like the S'Fly and think it's a good stove, particularly for those who want to do some real cooking.  It's definitely not the lightest, most compact stove, but it has a well distributed flame and will support larger pots and pans well.

HJ

11:01 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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So what type of weight are we talking about here to actually cause this to happen? I am quite sure it is a bit more than what the intended use of the stove actually is from my own personal experiences over the years..

I guess this goes with the whole piezo ingnition thing. I personally think they are added junk because in time they break. My FS mini that I carry will always throw a spark.

This is a substantial element to a discussion. Different opinions.

Thanks for the response HJ.

11:43 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

So what type of weight are we talking about here?

 Hi, Rick,

I'm not sure to whom that question is directed, but just to clarify my earlier post, when I say "will support larger pots and pans well" I'm speaking in terms of stability rather than the ability to bear weight.

HJ

11:54 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I personally have not encountered a canister stove yet that I would consider "stable" due to their heigth. I use a canister support with mine at times.

In all seriousness, a Win-Pro would be more stable than a PR as well as most other canister models out there just because of its lower center of gravity.

Canister stoves have their pros but I have found them all a bit "tippy" if you are not paying attention to what you are doing.

HJ- I was speaking in reference to how much weight it would take to actually bend the supports on the PR.

Lets face it, if you do not use alot of your gear the way it is intended you can have catastrophic failures. Thats where my problem lies with the whole "flimsy support" reference ya made.

Everything has limitations, its a good idea to know them and respect them.

12:38 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Yeah, I think I'm with you there, Rick.  Canister stoves are generally a bit tippy.  I've had good luck with using a Camping Gaz HP470 on a 230g type tank.  It's a much bigger burner and wider pot support than most.  The HP470 is my favorite for when I'm driving to a trailhead the night before so I can get an early start the next morning.

I also agree with you that a remote canister set up like the Wind Pro is going to be more stable.  I have a bit of a preference for remote canister set ups.  They are more stable, they can be used in temperatures that are much colder, and they are easy to use a windscreen with.  For "fast and light" or day trips where I just want a quick cup of tea on the trail, I tend to take upright type canister stoves.  For real cooking or heavier weather, I tend to take remote set ups.

I hear you about using gear the way it is intended.  Point well taken and at the same time accidents happen.  In the case where the PR's supports got bent, it was being used properly, but an accident occurred.  In any event, as I say, the PR isn't a bad stove; I just happen to like other stoves better.  There are some stoves which I just flat out think are bad.  If I think a stove really is bad, I'll come right out and say so.  I think there are some downsides to almost any stove, including some of my favorites, but citing a downside isn't the same as labeling a stove as a bad stove.

HJ

12:59 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I agree. I have been contemplating the WindPro for awhile now. I like the rocket but with that said it has its limitations. Then again for $39 I can't complain much.

I have a bunch of other stoves that I have bought over the years not to mention a liquid for winter.

HJ, have you ever had problems with ISO canisters in cold temps? I usually keep them in the footbox of my bag to keep them at a warmer temp.

I will say that if the design of the canister supports are of concern during purchase then maybe the SuperFly would be a much better option.

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/msr/superfly/

1:48 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick,

For cold weather use, one of the first things you want to look at is your fuel blend.  Avoid "plain" butane, even if it's only a relatively small percentage of the total.  The propane and isobutane have higher vapor pressures and will burn off faster when vapor is withdrawn from the canister leaving you with nothing but butane left toward the end of the life of your canister.  "Plain" butane won't vaporize below 31F/-0.5C, and is a poor choice for cold weather. 

The next thing to consider for cold weather is something you're already doing:  keeping the gas warm.  The gas as you use it will get colder.  You can counteract the canister getting colder by putting the canister in liquid water.  Water, so long as it isn't frozen, is always above 32F/0C.  If you've got good fuel (i.e. no plain butane), then your main fuel component will be isobutane which vaporizes at 11F/-12C.  The water temperature, even very cold water, will be enough to keep the fuel vaporizing.  See also this article in Seattle Backpacker's Magazine.  I feel pretty comfortable using the water technique down to about 20F/-7C. 

When temps get in the teens (F) or lower, keeping the water liquid can be a pain.  I then start thinking about using a remote canister set up where I can invert the canister.  When I turn the canister upside down, now liquid fuel is being pushed out the bottom instead of vapor being pulled off the top.  The fuel is then vaporized at the burner by the heat of the flame.  Using the heat of the flame to vaporize the fuel means that you don't have to worry so much about the outside temperature.  You do need to have a pre-heat loop on your stove for this to work.  The aforementioned Wind Pro does have just such a loop.  See also this second article in Seattle Backpacker's Magazine.   I feel comfortable with this technique down to at least 0F/-18C.

When you start getting much below 0F, I personally start thinking about using a liquid fueled stove.  Yes, as long as you can keep your gas warm, you can use a gas stove down to any temperature, but if for any reason your gas gets cold...  At temps well below 0F, I tend to play it pretty safe.

Hopefully that's not too much information!  Just trying to give a complete answer.

HJ

2:27 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Actually HJ that was very informative/helpful and I want to thank you quite a bit for the response. I suck all of this stuff up like a sponge.

In some of the temps I have been exposed too(negatives when windchill factor is added to the temp) to effectively keep a canister model stove in working order one would not only have to keep the canister warm in such an area as a footbox of a sleeping bag at night but also keeping it close to the body while in transit during the day.

If the can is sitting in your pack while in transit to your next shelter site it can become quite cold due to the main source of heat has been eliminated from the equasion. The human body. Which in turn can make things quite a hassle when ya want to grab a warm bite to eat after getting camp situated.

3:15 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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You're welcome.

A lot of people, even fairly experienced back country travelers, don't realize how important fuel selection is in cold weather.  For weather above 50F/10C, it doesn't matter what brand you buy.  But for colder weather, avoid plain butane.

For me, I generally break out the remote canister set up if it's going to be below 40F/5C.  Yes, upright canister stoves can work below that temp, but why mess with having to warm the canister and all that.  I'd rather just have it covered.

HJ

3:26 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I personally never use butane. With the availability with the iso-blend I don't see the reson too.

Absolutely with ya on the whole being covered remark. I am the same way. I would always rather have too much than not enough. This goes with so much of the gear I own. Bags especially.

5:14 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

I personally never use butane. With the availability with the iso-blend I don't see the reson too.

 Well there are popular brands like Primus and Coleman brand canisters that have butane content. Those brands are fine for summer use, but I'd stick with brands like MSR and Snow Peak for cold weather.

HJ

3:48 p.m. on August 7, 2011 (EDT)
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When i read the headline I got inspired. I own both things (i had forgotten about the PR!) But now i tried to put them together. It works really good. The Fluxring on the 1.5 L pot makes it really stable on the PR. You wount't lose your dinner!

I'm looking forward to try this konfiguration on my next trip.

I can easely take pictures, boiling time, weight or other information if you would like. But you may already have bought something else.

Feel free to write me if you would like any information.

klacki@hotmail.com

6:50 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Klacki:

The PR + Jetboil pot sounds like an interesting match up, but one question:  why not just bring the Jetboil stove instead of the PR stove?  Seems like there wouldn't be that much advantage to using the PR stove.  Maybe you'd save an ounce or two?

HJ

5:10 p.m. on August 9, 2011 (EDT)
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It is not always about saving an ounce or two. Sometimes its just about having fun and feel really comfortable. I also have the pan to the JB. So when i'm out in the "wild" with my wife and want to cook a nice meal I can both cook potatoes on the JB stove and at the same time fry a nice beef on the PR. There are problably many other, cheaper, lighter and maybe more streamlined ways to do this but I happen to own both stoves.

But i was in fact a little surprised by how little time it took for the PR to get 1 L to the boil. So i'm looking forward to cook a prober meal and having a good time in a camp somewhere :o)

And since the topic was Jetboil 1.5 L pot + MSR Pocket Rocket I just wanted to help Suekichi if he needed any.

 


 

7:23 a.m. on August 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks, klacki. I already went and bought the Primus EtaPacklite stove system. It's small and compact, and I've definitely taken a liking to it. 

I decided against the JB pot because it was suggested that it's difficult to clean after use. Something to do with the coating. Perhaps you can confirm or disaffirm this? 

3:05 p.m. on August 12, 2011 (EDT)
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I've only boiled water in the pot so far but  I also have the pan. I think it's the same coating and yes it's a little hard to clean. So the other  pot is problably a good choice!

10:04 p.m. on August 12, 2011 (EDT)
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I have a question,

I have never used a pocket rocket, would a taller pot (VS wider) like the Snow Peak 900 work well?

I am thinking of getting a Pocket Rocket for my son who will be going on some trips with me this fall and I have a couple extra Snow Peak pots lying around.

I have a SP 700, 900, 1200, and their soloist.

Thanks.

Edit: I meant to say the 1400 not the 1200....I'm getting tired.

10:24 p.m. on August 12, 2011 (EDT)
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trouthunter- I have found a taller pot to work just fine on my PR. My set that I currently use is the GSI Soloist. IF you look at the pice below this is the pot to the set with an 8oz Iso cannister in it just for reference as to how wide vs how deep this pot is.  


GSI-2-004.jpg

10:30 p.m. on August 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks Rick!

10:39 p.m. on August 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Never a problem. As a suggestion, I would spend the few extra bucks on the MSR Universal Canister Stand. They make a big difference when it comes to stability. 

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/msr/universal-canister-stand/

I think Brunton makes one as well... Just a thought. 

10:43 p.m. on August 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Never a problem. As a suggestion, I would spend the few extra bucks on the MSR Universal Canister Stand. They make a big difference when it comes to stability. 

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/msr/universal-canister-stand/

I think Brunton makes one as well... Just a thought. 

 Cool....thanks for the heads up.

At only a couple ounces that's definitely worth doing.

10:54 p.m. on August 12, 2011 (EDT)
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The canister stand can compensate if ya get less than the perfect base for the stove. If ya notice the pic I posted above it can get pretty tall and as you know with a higher center of gravity the possibility of knocking your dinner off the stove is greater. I have yet to dump a meal but things happen. 

6:56 a.m. on August 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Here's another question for you guys,

A lot of the areas I have been camping in lately have very sandy soil, if not pure sand, like a beach.

Not being a canister stove expert myself, I'm wondering if there is any downside or danger in partially burying the canister in the sand to stabilize the stove?

I saw a couple do this a few weeks ago out at the lake.

This is not something I would do in  grassy or rocky topsoil of course, I would rather use the canister stand for that application.

2:41 p.m. on August 13, 2011 (EDT)
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trouthunter said:

Here's another question for you guys,

A lot of the areas I have been camping in lately have very sandy soil, if not pure sand, like a beach.

Not being a canister stove expert myself, I'm wondering if there is any downside or danger in partially burying the canister in the sand to stabilize the stove?

I saw a couple do this a few weeks ago out at the lake.

This is not something I would do in  grassy or rocky topsoil of course, I would rather use the canister stand for that application.

 I can't see a reason why this would cause a problem as long as you don'y bury it completely. If ya do that then the flame may warm the ground which could cause an increase in the internal pressure of the canister. We all know pressurized fuel is volatile for a reason.

I think if ya just bury a 1/4 of the canister it should be smooth sailing for ya. 

9:17 p.m. on August 13, 2011 (EDT)
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I use, and am quite happy with for my usage, the REI pasta pot (http://trailspace.com/gear/rei/ti-ware-pasta-pot/). I use a liquid fuel stove (MSR Simmerlite) but see no reason it wouldn't work well on a cartridge gas stove (?).

The Pot has vents in the lid for straining pasta etc, and handles which stay 'cool enough' if I position the pot carefully to valid flames coming up that side.

But I have only used it for boiling water :-) so YMMV. The OP didn't indicate what kind of cooking was involved.

5:49 p.m. on August 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Klacki said:

I also have the pan to the JB. So when i'm out in the "wild" with my wife and want to cook a nice meal I can both cook potatoes on the JB stove and at the same time fry a nice beef on the PR.

 

Ah, now that makes sense, cooking two things simultaneously.

HJ

5:51 p.m. on August 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Suekichi said:

I decided against the JB pot because it was suggested that it's difficult to clean after use. Something to do with the coating. Perhaps you can confirm or disaffirm this? 

I haven't had much difficulty cleaning my JB GCS pot.  The taller, narrower PCS pot is harder to clean, but mostly because of it's narrowness not because it's made out of something that is hard to clean.

HJ

5:55 p.m. on August 16, 2011 (EDT)
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trouthunter said:

I have a question,

I have never used a pocket rocket, would a taller pot (VS wider) like the Snow Peak 900 work well?

I am thinking of getting a Pocket Rocket for my son who will be going on some trips with me this fall and I have a couple extra Snow Peak pots lying around.

I have a SP 700, 900, 1200, and their soloist.

Thanks.

Edit: I meant to say the 1400 not the 1200....I'm getting tired.

 

A lot of people like a taller pot, particularly since a canister can nest inside along with a small stove.  However, wider pots typically catch the flame better and are more efficient.  You definitely don't want flames to be licking up the sides of the pot.

HJ

5:56 p.m. on August 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Never a problem. As a suggestion, I would spend the few extra bucks on the MSR Universal Canister Stand. They make a big difference when it comes to stability. 

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/msr/universal-canister-stand/

I think Brunton makes one as well... Just a thought. 

 

Jetboil makes a pretty good one.  The Brunton one fits 8oz size canisters but doesn't work at all with smaller 4oz sized canisters like Snow Peak or Jetboil.

HJ

1:21 p.m. on August 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey HJ, yeah I figured there were probably a few companies out there that produced them. I think for the cost and the weight its not a bad purchase for anyone who uses this type of stove.

1:49 p.m. on August 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I haven't tried the MSR version, but it looks good from what I've seen.

I mainly wanted to point out that I didn't like Brunton's version.  I wouldn't recommend the Brunton version simply because it won't fit a lot of popular sized 4oz class canisters.  Oddly, the Brunton version's inner notches fit the cheap 100% butane canisters that one can buy at a grocery store, the type that are used in the restaurant/hospitality industry for table side cooking on those flat, square little stoves.  Why anyone would want to stand one of those canisters on end is beyond me although the inner notches may have been intended for a canister type with a similar diameter that is not popular/available here in the US.

HJ

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