Camp lantern

3:20 p.m. on August 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Use a aluminum can and make a candle holder that works very well. Save the tab on the top to hang the lantern by.


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4:04 p.m. on August 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Gary  "Macgyver" Palmer :) Have you tried a reflective surface inside can to magnify lumen. I wonder what would happen if you placed your signal mirror inside? Or, is there no differance. Just curious.

5:09 p.m. on August 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Ingenious, Gary.

If you put your signal mirror in there, you'd for sure get wax all over it, and you might crack the mirror.

HJ

6:12 p.m. on August 17, 2011 (EDT)
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The inside of a can already has enough reflectability to me.

11:26 p.m. on August 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Last longer, is stronger, controls light

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10:41 a.m. on August 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Callahan said:

Last longer, is stronger, controls light

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 Yes but Gary has achieved a rare and admirable balance between living well and relaxed while on a humble, shoestring budget. Much of his success in that regard is due to ingenuity such as creating this soda-can lamp. Well done Gary!

10:44 a.m. on August 18, 2011 (EDT)
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 But I too like practical equipment from the outdoor shops.

I bought one simular to that red lantern  this spring made by Black Diamond.


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And yes they are very bright and compact. Pictured above its about 9 inches tall with the legs down and the light shield drops down to cover the yellow switch stopping it from accidently turning on. Seen below...


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On sale now at www.BlackDiamondEquipment.com for $39.95

11:06 a.m. on August 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Ha! My husband will love this money saving idea..

11:32 a.m. on August 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Gary,

What a great idea for kids. They get to make something and use it on their camp out! I'm going to forward this to my son's cub scout den leader. Don't know if we'll be able to do it because of the sharp edges but I'm going to do it with my son.

4:09 p.m. on August 27, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said;

What a great idea for kids. They get to make something and use it on their camp out! I'm going to forward this to my son's cub scout den leader. Don't know if we'll be able to do it because of the sharp edges but I'm going to do it with my son.

We build these for the BSA metal-smith merit badge all the time.  If you cut the opening another 1/8 of an inch and fold the edges in, the metal can be crimped with a pair of pliers that will leave no sharp edge.  Same thing with the door edges.

7:38 a.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
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My favorite "go to" emergency preparedness/car camping flashlight is" :


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Weather Ready 3-in-1

It has a multi-position switch  that cycles the flashlight between the following functions:

1) two main leds of good power intensity

2) three leds contained in the opaque handle. This works great as a tent lantern or set on a table top in a power outage. It is very surprising how well this function works and how long the batteries last.

3) one amber led in the opaque handle that provides a soft "mood light" or night light for the kids in that power outage.

4) off

Not shown is a bungee strap and clip on the handle that can be looped into one of your tent loft attachments or spiral wrapped around a tent pole/trekking pole

I have tried checking the manufacturers web site and don't see this currently listed which I guess means there is a possibility that they don't make this anymore. Its still listed on many sites for web sales.

I never met a flashlight that I didn't like but I can say that for the money this model has a most excellent usefulness per dollar ratio.

AR

11:14 a.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
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GaryPalmer said:


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Use a aluminum can and make a candle holder that works very well. Save the tab on the top to hang the lantern by.


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 Hang the lantern with wire, not string.  The heat coming out of the "chimney" can burn natural materials and melt poly.

8:20 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I have never actually hung mine just sat on something else like a rock. And yes the can will become very hot, so after you blow out the canyon wait a bit as you would your stove before you handle it.

8:30 a.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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I would think the lamp would tend to turn unless on a wire or something stiff.  Setting it on something would probably be the best way to go.

7:48 a.m. on October 5, 2011 (EDT)
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I love my little UCO candle lantern! The lantern itself was 20 bucks at gander mountain, and the top and side reflectors cost an extra 7! 3 pack of the 9 hour candles is 4 0r 5 bucks! It throws of enough light to see around your campsight, appears to be windproof so far, very compact and lightweight.  I havnt had any issues at all with the wax dripping either....and it packs quite niceley into one of the thin foam can koozies for a little extra protection in my pack....also, if you hang it from inside your tent, it pretty much keeps any condensation from building up, and in cold weather will actually keep the inside of your tent a few degrees warmer....enough difference to notice!  Im very happy with mine, never leave home without it! That and my headlamp provide all the light i need!

4:06 p.m. on October 6, 2011 (EDT)
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XterroBrando said:

Callahan said:

Last longer, is stronger, controls light

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 Yes but Gary has achieved a rare and admirable balance between living well and relaxed while on a humble, shoestring budget. Much of his success in that regard is due to ingenuity such as creating this soda-can lamp. Well done Gary!

For me right now while looking for more work, a new job, my budgetting is on max so I know what you mean.  I do agree that budget is nearly always a consideration and additionally making things for use is ectremely fun and satisfying too.  A good self pat on the back is always appreciated and builds one's mood, motivation and self esteem.

I do think that this little lantern at $30 would budget out real well against the cost of candles and cans, against the lifetime with batteries of course of this nearly indestructible lantern.

Just my 1c worth of opinion, sorry I am on a budget.

8:47 a.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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I too love the little UCO candles. We now have 3 of them. 2 stay at Base Camp Rita, and the other goes with me.

10:41 p.m. on October 11, 2011 (EDT)
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2:21 a.m. on October 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Pretty cool lights but not as cool as a good ol' Dietz Lantern:

 


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4:39 p.m. on October 13, 2011 (EDT)
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I have one of those old Dietz Lanterns that I love dearly! Sure, it's not as bright as some nifty, shiny LED plastic dodad, but it has a really nice charm and the light of a real flame is so much more aesthetically pleasing. Of course, with it's size and liquid fuel, its only good for car camping, home, and garden use. 

As far as Gary's coke can lantern, I seriously doubt you would catch up to the cost of that battery powered one if you are thrifty when you shop for candles. Heck, i picked up a bag of 50 votives for $3 a while back. That's a heck of a lot of burn time. 

12:01 a.m. on October 14, 2011 (EDT)
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"Coleman 237 lanterns with an American Optical film strip and slide projector (left) and a Society for Visual Education Inc. slide and film strip projector (right).
The potential markets were missionaries and rural communities
that lacked electric power, according to a 1949 Coleman News. These undated lanterns are in Dick Sellers', left, and Shirley Willard's, right, collections. The Charles Beseler Co. also made a similar projector for this lantern."

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7:45 a.m. on October 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey I want one of those. I could take a sheet along and annoy fellow campers with slide shows of old family get-togethers.

8:50 a.m. on October 14, 2011 (EDT)
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those are the sweetest projectors I think I have ever seen :)

1:36 a.m. on October 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I have been an avid collector of kerosene wick and mantle lamps for many years as well as finger lamps.  Here are some of the ones I like to play with out of doors.
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From left to right

 A little model 5101 Coleman LP Canister lantern that I got from Goodwill for $3.99.  The cool thing about this lamp is it camewith a used intacked mantle that I was able to get home on my motorcycle without breaking it as well as a original gas canester that still is half full.  This lamp is from the late 1950 just me.

The Middle one is a Model C metal Aladdin that uses a round wick and a Mantel.  The mantles for these thing are getting pricey so I don't use it very often.  With a regular chimney it is as bright as a 60 watt light bulb.  With a high altitude chimeny and or a chimeny extender you can extent the brightnes of the mantel to 80+ watts of light.  This also will use up kerosene or lamp oil quicker.  Notice the large bug (moth) screen on top of the chimney.  The bug screen is a necessary item if you wnat to keep yur mantle intact and not have a stinky sucide mothie experiance in the dark.

On of my favorite lampsis the Dietz No. 3 Beacon Light.  I have this light in my emergency boxes in my pickup.  It can be hung as a free hanging lamp or used as a wall or tree lamp,  hung on a wall or tree trunk.

 

Here is a real cool Aladdin Model 12 hanging lamp.  The bottom of the lamp along with the frame has light rust, making this lamp a user lamp rather than a colletor lamp.  I like to take this lamp along when possible.  This and Dietz make a great couple of light on a trip.
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Notice the flater bug screen on this lamp.  You can only use a regular size chimney rather than the longer high altitude chimeny on this lamo in this frame.

8:03 a.m. on October 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm gonna play devils advocate here and state that I absolutely hate camp lanterns...and as a matter of fact, I hate camp fires too.

 

 I find lanterns really annoying and I make sure that my camping partners leave them out of their packs.

 

When I'm camping I really like being in the illumination that nature provides.

If one truly needs some sort of camp illumination, I find that a lightstick hung from a tree branch is totally adequate and provides a nice soft, non-blinding glow, and you still maintain your "night eyes".

 

Blue or red lightsticks are really nice.

 

Of course there is nothing wrong with wearing a headlamp and only turning it on as needed.

9:15 a.m. on October 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Ed G said:

I'm gonna play devils advocate here and state that I absolutely hate camp lanterns...

If one truly needs some sort of camp illumination, I find that a lightstick hung from a tree branch is totally adequate and provides a nice soft, non-blinding glow, and you still maintain your "night eyes".

 

Blue or red lightsticks are really nice.

 

Of course there is nothing wrong with wearing a headlamp and only turning it on as needed.

 Stealth camping!!!!  Those chem sticks do put out quite a bit of light once you get your night vision.

11:48 a.m. on October 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Uh oh. This thread is beginning to sound like "Do you take your I-Pod with you". :>

Personally I have been keeping my eyes open for a canister gas lantern to use on overnight hikes or on hikes when I will arrive at the camp site after dark. Anybody have any suggestions?

2:39 p.m. on October 16, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said: "Personally I have been keeping my eyes open for a canister gas lantern to use on overnight hikes or on hikes when I will arrive at the camp site after dark. Anybody have any suggestions?"

Here is the Gaz system.  I believe they are still for sale at REI.  This set is 20-30 years old.  The fact that you can have a stove that uses the same canisters is also a bonus.  This kit is in my emergency pickup truck kit.  This doubles as my earthquake/disaster preparedness kit.
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The lantern is fairly small and uses one mantel.  I believe that the single small or med Coleman mantels well work in this. The lantern measures 6 in tall not including the folding handle and 4 in wide.  There are tow size canisters as yoiu can see the smaller CV270 and the larger CV470.  I believe that these used to be just butane as thats what I remember when I did my bick trip across part of Europe 30+ years ago.  They have a new mix of butane/propane.

 

 

 

Ed G said: 

"I'm gonna play devils advocate here and state that I absolutely hate camp lanterns...and as a matter of fact, I hate camp fires too.

I find lanterns really annoying and I make sure that my camping partners leave them out of their packs.

When I'm camping I really like being in the illumination that nature provides."

 

Hey Ed,   And devils advocat you have played.  Probably a good thing that we do not go camping together as being a grown man I'm pretty sure I can figure out what not to bring.  I do show my list to people and see if they have any suggestions as to what I might have forgotten.  But no one tell's me what I can't bring camping.  You do know that these lights have adjustments knobs on them that will bring the light down to lumins just as low or lower than that of a chem stick.  Many times when I'm out in the backcountry there is no "illumination that nature provides", it's cloudy, there is tree cover, I'm in a canyon, the moons is not out, there is a evil force hovering just above the camp, not to mention the large UFO's, etc.  That's the reason I bring a head lamp, a candle lamp and or a camping lantern as the ones shown above.  Often in the morning when I'm trying to sleep I find that the annoying roaring of the blow torch sound of peoples stoves wakes me up out of a gentle slumber...............................now that really chaps my hide, but I would never persume to tell a person to take his/her stove out of his/her pack and that they could not bring it with them just because it annoyed me.  But that's just me ;-}}

4:31 p.m. on October 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm very familar with the Gaz lanterns...I have one and carried it for many miles before I knew any better.

It now lives in my closet and comes out when the hurricanes knock out the power.

Even candles are too bright for my campsite.

4:42 p.m. on October 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Oh, and when the folks I camp with discover they can survive without carrying around their gas or battery operated lighthouses, they always thank me for showing them how much fun it is to go "natural".

 

People find it a total rush to hike around at night and leave their flashlights in their pockets.

I found a camping source in Germany thas has adapters for the Camping Gaz stoves and lanterns.  I now can use my Camping Gaz stove with my Jet Boil fuel cans and visa versa.

Man, wish we had an Edit Function :)

5:08 p.m. on October 16, 2011 (EDT)
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@ Ed G : Are you refering to the Edit function after you post?  If  that's what you are refering to, I've just posted a few things and I have my edit function avaliable to me after I post.  If your edit button is not avaliable to you after you post you might talk to Dave in the feedback section.  My formating functions go missing for days on end with little notice or explanation other than the fact that I'm still on dialup.  With that being said Dave is very adept at figuring out many of the problems like the one you may be dealing with.

6:19 p.m. on October 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Ed G said:

People find it a total rush to hike around at night and leave their flashlights in their pockets.

 I am not quite sure where you hike but 99% of my trips require some type of illumination on trail when travelling at night. The alternative will be a trip to the ER or possibly worse.

I personally do not recommend anyone hike at night without some type of adequate light source. Its just not worth the risk(unless of course you never leave flat, packed gravel trails.)

9:55 p.m. on October 16, 2011 (EDT)
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One of the local scout masters takes his boys on a night hike each year.  They have lights with them but don't use them.  I think he tries to time it with a full or close to full moon.  They start the hike at dusk and go several miles into Juniper Prairie and set up camp. 

5:53 a.m. on October 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick, when I lived in Pittsburgh I thought the exact same way :)

 

Few years back I was night hiking with a friend and he was walking behind a couple of us.

 

 He stopped us and told us all he could see from us was flashlights all over the place like some kind of light show at a rock concert.

 

He suggested we all put our flashlights away and give it a try. We did. Felt weird at 1st, but a mile later I was hooked.

 

I'm not advocating hiking around all the time sans illumination.  Like I mentioned, I will sometimes put a light stick on my hat, and when I am wading thru Florida swamps at nigt, I most certainly will have the flashlight on.  Once saw a snake swimming between my legs :)

Night time in the camp is another story. One does not need to have a constant source of bright light.

Your out there to totally enjoy nature... why carry unnecessary weight and bulk in your pack, when a headlamp and a light stick is all one needs.

 

Of course we all have our preferences.  I'd rather carry a camping stool and a flask of tequilla than a lantern and the extra fuel for it. 

 

OK, now I see the "Edit" button!  I was looking for something more obvious.

 

 

5:57 a.m. on October 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Nope....once you post your reply that Edit avatar hits the road.

 

and yes APE, I did post something about this on the feedback forum.

2:03 p.m. on October 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey Ed, here's the problem I have encountered at night on trail.

The dense tree tops block out the moon even if it is at full force on a clear night to the point that it is not much help... 

I am pretty safety conscious being I am typically solo for a week+ at a time so I really do not take any unnecessary risk. I just don't want to encounter any problems on the trail if they can be easily avoided.

2:50 p.m. on October 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I think one thing to consider is that not everyone has the same retinal light sensitivity, which means some people's eyes literally cant adjust enough to see much of anything in low light. Good night vision is also something that tends to wane with age for many. Poor sight also complicates the difficulty by itself, as well as the reflective and refractive tendencies of corrective lenses. The result is not everyone is physically capable of seeing as well in low illumination.

I am very grateful that I do have fairly good night vission, and absolutely love hiking by moon and starlight. But if it is overcast and I am under a canopy while hiking over threacherous terrain, there simply isn't adequate ambient light for me to see well enough not to break an ankle.

2:55 p.m. on October 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm not a big fan of lighting up my whole camp, let alone the forest. As I have seen ppl do. But a nice soft light is nice. One small candle does the trick for us.

3:12 p.m. on October 17, 2011 (EDT)
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gonzan said:

I think one thing to consider is that not everyone has the same retinal light sensitivity, which means some people's eyes literally cant adjust enough to see much of anything in low light. Good night vision is also something that tends to wane with age for many. Poor sight also complicates the difficulty by itself, as well as the reflective and refractive tendencies of corrective lenses. The result is not everyone is physically capable of seeing as well in low illumination.

I am very grateful that I do have fairly good night vission, and absolutely love hiking by moon and starlight. But if it is overcast and I am under a canopy while hiking over threacherous terrain, there simply isn't adequate ambient light for me to see well enough not to break an ankle.

 

Hey gonzan, I resemble the first apart of that quote. Even with that being said I have tripped one to many times in the dark over roots, rocks, and tent guy lines (I really hate those things).  As we are each out in the backcountry to enjoy it in our own ways we should each bring the appropriate amount of light that allows us to enjoy our time out there with out infringing upon others enjoyment. That can be hard sometimes, for instance with this light thing.  All I know is that I will bring the right amount of illumination for me to be happy, comfortable, and most of all safe. You all should do the same thing brign as much or as little light as makes you happy. Have fun out there.

Oh, show me more lamps please?????!!!!................please

3:30 p.m. on October 17, 2011 (EDT)
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When I'm on the trail, I too will use as much light as necessary to keep myself safe. I can't argue with that.

However, when it is really dark out due to tree cover, clouds, no moon, etc and your in camp...the brighter those little light sticks become ;)

Give it a shot. Tie a rope on one, throw it over a tree branch and hang it about 7 feet above the ground.

I also like to hang one up with my food bag, so I can easily see where my camp is when  I'm returning from a long day hike.

4:24 p.m. on October 17, 2011 (EDT)
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@ Ed G : 

There could be a disconnect here in our discussion here. As I live west of the Mississippi ,I,  in my whole life, do not remember a time when I have not had a camp fire when backpacking or camping.  There may be a time, but not one I can think of at the moment.............except  when I'm stealth camping and then one aspires to use as little light as possible, which would then exclude a chem stick.  When we have a camp fire there is no need for any light unless and until one strays from the middle of the campsite.  For quick forays away one can then use ones chosen method of light. I like my head lamp, candle lamp, and or a gas fired lamp as all of these can be turned on and off (candle lamps in the most basic way).  As I buy almost nothing new I will be on the look out at the Goodwill store for some chem sticks.  One of the problems I see with chem sticks it that once I would activate them I cannot turn them off and much of the light may be wasted when I don't need the light.  Like I said, if I can find some for cheap I will check them out and see if their something I'd want to add to my gear choices.

 

10:25 p.m. on October 17, 2011 (EDT)
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apeman said:

 One of the problems I see with chem sticks it that once I would activate them I cannot turn them off and much of the light may be wasted when I don't need the light.  

Brian, they make a plastic tube with a swivel cover which lets you adjust the amount of light you need or close it completely out.  The chem lights are a nice mellow light, but they are only good for a certain amount of hours.  I don't like hauling around the dead ones.  Just more trash to get rid of.  I'd rather just keep a small LED.

5:52 a.m. on October 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I also have one of the battery operated "light Sticks" as described above.

It's in the closet with my Camping Gaz lantern (hurricane supply box)

It's a nice toy, but actually weighs as much as three light sticks and isn't as bright.  Then you have the chore of disposing the batteries in a proper manner.

I like to cut the lightsticks, drain the fluid (NON-TOXIC) to eliminate weight and then recycle the plastic at home

 

I typically get 8 hours of usable light with a fresh lightstick...most of the time, if it's in the tent with me, I have to cover the darn thing up so I can get to sleep.

Life and brightness of a chem light is dependant on how it is stored and ambient air temp when used (they do not like to be kept in the fridge).

I would not trust one purchased at a thrift store - it very well could be one of MY old ones.

Ape, where I camp, fires are not permitted in backcountry...thank God.

I do frequently enjoy a nice campfire in my backyard...not far from the beer fridge on my pool deck :)

9:30 a.m. on October 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Campfires? Not for me backpacking. Car camping yes. As I said before the UCO candle is my main light. I do carry a wind-up LCD. I hate batteries. I use as little light as I can. Even car camping those Coleman lanterns that light up the whole camp ground drives me nuts. To me that's as bad as bring your motorhome with a 52" flat screen Tv. I've seem too many ppl park those things and never get out cept to play with the satilite dish.

Little story: The first time Rita talked me into car camping. A very big motorhome pulled in on the other side of us. Back and forth he went for 15 minutes trying to get into the space. I looked on in horror. He finaly got parked, came over to me and braged about his tv in there. I told him that I didnt even have a tv at home. Then asked him if he saw the sunset last night. He and his wife, came out of the motorhome sat down and read books, then watched the sunset. Before he took off the next day he thanked me, and told me that the didnt turn on the tv that night. Some people sometimes forget why they are camping.

12:49 p.m. on October 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Ed G said:

Oh, and when the folks I camp with discover they can survive without carrying around their gas or battery operated lighthouses, they always thank me for showing them how much fun it is to go "natural".

 

People find it a total rush to hike around at night and leave their flashlights in their pockets.

I found a camping source in Germany thas has adapters for the Camping Gaz stoves and lanterns.  I now can use my Camping Gaz stove with my Jet Boil fuel cans and visa versa.

Man, wish we had an Edit Function :)

 Hi Ed, a tad off topic,  but would you mind posting the link as to where to score a couple of these adapters for the Camping GAZ...I could probably google it but if you have positive experience with the vendor that is a help.

Many thanks,

Mazama

12:59 p.m. on October 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I can't seem to locate the vendor that I purchased from, but here is a link showing the adapter

 

http://www.shopwiki.co.uk/Adaptor-for-Push-Twist-Camping-Gaz-Cartridge/stores/Adaptor?o=369488695&s=227252

1:05 p.m. on October 18, 2011 (EDT)
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more

http://walkhigh.co.uk/acatalog/info_2975.html

I think I may have purchased mine from these folks (not in Germany as I thought)

http://www.actionoutdoors.co.uk/outdoor_gear/Stoves_Spares___Accessories.html

2:11 p.m. on October 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I usually don't use a lamp outdoors much as I like to make camp an hour or so before dark so I can take care of all my tent set=up, cooking and bathroom needs before dark.

2:50 a.m. on October 19, 2011 (EDT)
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I typically bring a classic Coleman gas lantern when I car camp - it's the only chance I get to use it, and it really bangs the light out.

I've often wished I had something similar for moto-camping. Might give this a try!

10:39 a.m. on October 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks Ed....appreciate the links Best, Mazama

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