Coffee making gear

10:54 a.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I am one of those guys that just wants a good morning jolt (1-2 cups) of coffee, and have been using instant, or just skip the coffe and start hiking.

Long story short- My buddy that was in the Pines Campground staying at basecamp, had one of those 1960/70's aluminum jobbies with the little glass doorknob looking window on top. Wow! I am hooked! I suppose that it held maybe 20oz/600ml, and with 2 small scoops of grounds made some nuclear juice, and with some heavy sugar, tasted fantastic and gave me a big jolt.

Anyway, I did a search, and didn't really find what I was looking for.

I did find a Snow Peak Titanium French Press, but titanium is only good for very specific applications, such as strictly boiling only water IMO.

I also found some GSI stainless ones that look good, I am not an UL'er, but I do like to err on the side of lighter. I also found an aluminum unit, but the folding wire handles, while more compact when stowed, might suck in use.

I am interested in the "percolator" types, and might be sold on a French Press..............

What are my options for a 1-2 person system?

12:17 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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MHO, I think this is too much extra bulk to carry in the backcountry not to mention glass is involved. We had a discussion a bit back in regards to the whole coffee thing.

While I do own presses etc for home use I personally just go this route.

After ya make the coffee you can always burn the bags up on the ol fire. 

050.jpg

They weigh next to nothing and work well imho. Alot cheaper than buying a press or some other gizmo to make your go-go juice... If its not strong enough add another bag. 

12:40 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Well, this isn’t what you asked for but for what it’s worth I use a pour over device. I paid $2.99 for it (found it in the coffee aisle of my local grocery store). It’s not “specially designed backpacking equipment” but works better than my JetBoil coffee press. I use the little funnel shaped filters and premeasure the grounds into little plastic bags.


Summer-Trip-3-044.jpg

4:23 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Android:

If you want one of those 1960s era percolators I have exactly what you are describing, and will be willing to part with it if you pay for shipping.  Contact me via PM, and I will send photos of my jolt generator.

For what it is worth I currently use the system described by Patman.  I have seen presses and other technology used in the backcountry, but considered them too much work for some Joe.    I know the purists scoff at paper filters precluding essential oils from making it to my cup, but I am content with the trade offs of ease-of-use versus quality this system offers.

Since I am the self-designated cook of my trips (the best way to assure proper kitchen hygiene is do it yourself) I take several of these drip brewers, so everyone get their morning Joe quickly.  The only drawback I noticed with the brewers I purchase was the coffee was on the weak side, due to the drop hole being too large, permitting the water to drain too quick.  Since these brewers are plastic, that problem is easy to resolve using a heated metal implement to reduce the size of drip hole opening.

Ed

4:30 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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My grandparents used a perculator and made a wickedly strong cup of coffee. For me I want flavor, convienence, and keeping it simple. On the trail using a system like Patmans or Ricks will make a very good tasting cup of coffee that I think would pass most any blind taste test. However for those that want it stronger, try bringing a baggie of instant coffee and adding a spoonful or two to your regular brew.

4:52 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I have tried a lot of different systems, but I am hooked on the GSI H2JO. It's basically a metal net that screws into any wide mouth Nalgene type bottle. And it's simple:

Add boiking water to the bottle

screw on H2JO with course ground coffee

Turn Upside down for 3 minutes or so

Pour and enjoy..

I keep it stored right in the bottle that has many uses besides coffee.

I tried others including the MSR Mug Mate and wasn't happy with it. And I never had a good place to pack it and it seems delicate. I use a Jetboil stove and got the French Press for it and no matter what coffee I used, it was very grindy and mud like.

5:54 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Mike (Bkuti, above) and I share this passion for the GSI H2Joe.   As-a-matter of fact, his mention of it in another .... and fairly long-ish ... post-topic, prompted me to get one.   His comments were accurate.   I even went out and bought another.

I also have the MSR Mug Mate he mentions above.  It's OK for some applications -- namely, home kitchen use ... car camping.

BTW, Mike ---  Thanks again for the lids.

Just for your own info ...  'google' the "Pour Over (or, Pour Through) Coffee Making Method".   Also, 'google' the Japanese company, "HARIO"'s products.   ( I have several).   And, finally, 'google' the "Clever Coffee Dripper".  (I have one, also).

All of these essentially do the same thing: namely, make the best (professional baristas all agree) coffee ... in the easiest and simplest manner.

                                                       ~r2~

7:22 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I prefer a fine cup of joe at home, fresh ground beans etc. But on the trail I like to keep it simple, and have little or no clean up involved.

I have started using the starbucks via instant coffee, IMO it's amazingly good for being instant coffee. Add hot water, stir, and enjoy. No cleanup involved.

Via is a little pricier than other instant brands, but there are other options out there just experiment with different brands until you find something you like.

I am a hound for getting free via samples from starbucks. I will go to a store with my wife, and when she orders her coffee I will just ask them if they have any via samples I could try. They will usually give out 2-3 at a time. One time back last xmas the guy gave me a box of like 30 because they were 'expired'. Still using them and they taste fine to me haha.

I have noticed that many of the people that try them say it tastes overpowering/burnt. I find that making it per directions does make a stout cup of joe, adding a little more water mellows it out a good deal if you don't like extra hair on your chest!

7:55 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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TheRambler said:

I prefer a fine cup of joe at home, fresh ground beans etc. But on the trail I like to keep it simple, and have little or no clean up involved.

I have started using the starbucks via instant coffee, IMO it's amazingly good for being instant coffee. Add hot water, stir, and enjoy. No cleanup involved.

Via is a little pricier than other instant brands, but there are other options out there just experiment with different brands until you find something you like.

I am a hound for getting free via samples from starbucks. I will go to a store with my wife, and when she orders her coffee I will just ask them if they have any via samples I could try. They will usually give out 2-3 at a time. One time back last xmas the guy gave me a box of like 30 because they were 'expired'. Still using them and they taste fine to me haha.

I have noticed that many of the people that try them say it tastes overpowering/burnt. I find that making it per directions does make a stout cup of joe, adding a little more water mellows it out a good deal if you don't like extra hair on your chest!

 

Interesting.

I like the VIA-branded coffees, also.  They work-out to be about $1 per packet.

Oddly, I keep some with me, and in my vehicle.   Whenever I stop (7-Eleven, Dunkin' Donuts, Panera Bread, etc.) for coffee and bagels, etc., I find their coffee TOO WEAK for my own taste.   I use the VIA coffee packets added to the store-bought weak coffee, to bring it up to my standards of "STRONG".   Usually, not the entire packet.

                                                   ~r2~

8:23 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

MHO, I think this is too much extra bulk to carry in the backcountry not to mention glass is involved. We had a discussion a bit back in regards to the whole coffee thing.

While I do own presses etc for home use I personally just go this route.

After ya make the coffee you can always burn the bags up on the ol fire. 

050.jpg

They weigh next to nothing and work well imho. Alot cheaper than buying a press or some other gizmo to make your go-go juice... If its not strong enough add another bag. 

Arrrh yes, the old coffee discussion once again.  It always seems to draft up some very colored discussions, some sweet and others bitter.  hehe.

I would have to agree with Ricks' post and the K.I.S.S. principle.

I find it hard that a search with "coffee" would not bring up something to satisfy your palette of good reading.

Try this one,

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/gear-selection/topics/88108.html

8:27 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Good call Callahan, I was trying to find that very thread but I couldn't remember what it was titled lol...

8:47 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I was searching for "Percolator" specifically, and thanks for that link!

I do use the VIA, but the percolator was just too satisfying to use, got to add the grounds, wait a few minutes, watch the lifejuice gurgle in the glass, and then pour the heavy duty java into my titanium cup...................

I bring my 123 quite often on short hikes that have limited elevation gain, or with non "hardcore" hikers. I am normally a speed freak, and hike 16-25 miles per day- I prefer to walk than to camp.........................but I have learned to slow down a little bit.

My last trip was the first time since the 1980's where I actually "camped" a little bit, and it was very fun. We even had Persian food one night (authentic, mind you) bread, fruit,veggies, the works.

I will only use it on occasion, but I want have to "work" a little.

Thanks for the offer, Whomeworry, and if I cant score one at the local thrift store, I might take you up on your offer.

9:37 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Callahan said:

Arrrh yes, the old coffee discussion once again.  It always seems to draft up some very colored discussions, some sweet and others bitter.  hehe.

I find it hard that a search with "coffee" would not bring up something to satisfy your palette of good reading.

Try this one,

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/gear-selection/topics/88108.html

 

Thanks for finding that post-topic, Callahan.  

That one was truly one of the all-time "CLASSICS".

Too bad it is now closed.  Why is that done?

I see some of my comments got yanked.   I can't imagine saying something dreadful.   I wonder how that happened?

                                                   ~r2~

4:03 a.m. on August 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

..I see some of my comments got yanked.   I can't imagine saying something dreadful.   I wonder how that happened?

Something dreadful?  Naw, you're a pussy cat!  Must be a data base glitch!

Ed (the weiner)

5:31 a.m. on August 26, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

Robert Rowe said:

.... my comments got yanked.   I can't imagine saying something dreadful.  

Something dreadful?  Naw, you're a pussy cat!  Must be a data base glitch!

Ed (the weiner)

 

Hmmm .... 

Might HAVE been my word-play on you being the "BIg WINNER".

I need to clean-up my pesky typos.  I'm getting CAREless.

                                                   ~r2~

3:15 p.m. on August 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Starbucks VIA packets are GREAT!!  I have also started using

Nescafe "clasico"  they are cheaper and the taste is good..

3:23 p.m. on August 27, 2011 (EDT)
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I enjoy the VIA also.  Simple, easy but a bit pricey. 

11:29 p.m. on August 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Coffee!  My oh my how I love thee!

I posted a about a month back in the "Bandana Coffee" thread about the different ways I make coffee.   Here is the Link to that post, added some items to the following post also. 

But it mostly boils down to how I am camping.  If just me or me and my kids (They don't like coffee) then I use a small, as in one person, press cup.  I make the first cup, then will make breakfast for whoever, and then a final cup that I often take with me.  The coffee is what ever I want to buy and as strong as I want, but usually one heaping spoon full is plenty. 

I also have a larger press that is make out of some kind of plastic, (Lexan?).  I took the handle off and made a pot cozy for it, it works great and keeps the coffee hot for quite a while, but if there are not 3 or more coffee drinkers, that all like the same kind of coffee, then it is a little large.  Unless you like drinking a pot every morning.  :)  - Use to drink several a day back when I worked in Restaurants! I guess that is why I can fall asleep drinking coffee. :(

I was also wondering if anyone had tried "Turkish Grind" for their coffee, it is ground like flower and dissolves in the coffee, so I have heard.  But is it real gritty?  or just a little gritty?  A little I could deal with.  Would sure make it easier.  I have not tried instant, but maybe I should, last I remember it was nothing like the real thing.

Wolfman

1:05 p.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

Mike (Bkuti, above) and I share this passion for the GSI H2Joe.   As-a-matter of fact, his mention of it in another .... and fairly long-ish ... post-topic, prompted me to get one.   His comments were accurate.   I even went out and bought another.

I also have the MSR Mug Mate he mentions above.  It's OK for some applications -- namely, home kitchen use ... car camping.

BTW, Mike ---  Thanks again for the lids.

Just for your own info ...  'google' the "Pour Over (or, Pour Through) Coffee Making Method".   Also, 'google' the Japanese company, "HARIO"'s products.   ( I have several).   And, finally, 'google' the "Clever Coffee Dripper".  (I have one, also).

All of these essentially do the same thing: namely, make the best (professional baristas all agree) coffee ... in the easiest and simplest manner.

                                                       ~r2~

 when you directed to Hario you haven't meant the Syphon right? :) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWduH2DJ7Ms I got one and it's cool, but not what I will pack with me when hiking...but it's a good fun making coffee with it...
 

1:19 p.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
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this is crazy! 3-4 hours for a cup! good for base camp - get it going, go hiking/climbing and when you are back your cup is ready! :)

http://coffeegeek.com/guides/icedcoffee
and Android, yes I am sorry, I know it have little to do with your question.

2:56 p.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Check out this 5-cup perk from Open Country. It may be reminiscent of that 1970's gear.

At 5 1/4" DIA x 6 1/4" tall , I  think that it is slightly larger that a Titan kettle. The clear knob on top is plastic not glass.


Open-Country-5-cup-perk.jpg

http://www.opencountrycampware.com/category_fbd677dca775/subcategory_a523bb4889d5/product_f6148049c8c1/session_eaa9c34da975/

I have one of these that I got to pack my SVEA 123 into. I tried it but went back to a Coleman nested set. It is not made of glass or stainless which may put the coffee hounds on red alert but it makes a good cup of mud in my opinion. I think this perk is an excellent produce for the price. I don't think that I would pack it but for car camping it is plenty small  for the "chuck box". If I did decide to bring it along on a trek I guess I could pack it full of food stuff. Open Country also has several Billy Pots that I think are "under the radar" and well worth a fair consideration.

Hope this is helpful,

AR

3:03 p.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
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@anlrolfe- Thats a pretty cool looking lil unit. 

7:57 p.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
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There are a lot of different ideas and likes and dislikes when it comes to coffee on this and any other backpacking web site.My self if I hike with a coffee guru I let them take care of that department.If solo or with non coffee drinkers I just use Starbucks Via instant coffee,pretty good and I think the best instant coffee.It is a little spendy but I get it with coupons so it is not to bad.ymmv

9:38 p.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Compared to the MRE(meals ready to eat) instant coffee anything is an improvement.

When I am packin' it, it will be instant coffee , tea or cocoa. We use the coffee packs when we have lots of Dads at the Scout events. None of these are gourmet but they keep the "coffee monkey" off my back till I get home.

In the field , K.I.S.S.. I've got bigger things to enjoy while on holiday than a cup of mud. I don't want to fuss over it and I sure as heck don't want anymore cleanup than necessary.

AR

11:56 p.m. on November 2, 2011 (EDT)
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anlrolfe said:

In the field , K.I.S.S.. I've got bigger things to enjoy while on holiday than a cup of mud. I don't want to fuss over it and I sure as heck don't want anymore cleanup than necessary.

 AR hit it right on...

get either instant or something you can use a filter with!
so that way there is either no mess at all, or the filter can just be put in the trash!

I use the GSI Outdoors Collapsible JavaDrip Slim Drip Coffee Maker
Just remember not to pour boiling water onto the coffee, or else it won't taste good! I've made that mistake one too many times!!

1:44 a.m. on November 3, 2011 (EDT)
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images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR5SfITURq-213R_XRhIB_

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7:40 a.m. on November 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Android:

If you would like among individuals sixties era percolators I've exactly what you're explaining, and will also be prepared to spend it should you purchase shipping.  Get in touch via PM, and that i will be sending photos of my jolt generator.

For what it's worth I presently make use of the system referred to by Patman.  I've come across presses along with other technology utilized in the back country, but considered them as well much work with some Joe.    I understand the purists scoff at paper filters precluding essential oils from which makes it to my cup, however i am quite happy with the trade offs of ease-of-use versus quality this technique offers.

Since I Have am the self-designated prepare of my outings (the easiest method to assure proper kitchen hygiene is do-it-yourself) I take a number of these drip machines, so everybody obtain morning Joe rapidly.  The only real drawback I observed using the machines I order was the coffee was around the weak side, because of the drop hole being too big, enabling water to empty too quick.  As these machines are plastic, this problem is simple to solve utilizing a heated metal implement to lessen how big drip hole opening.

_________________________
happy.gif

9:48 a.m. on November 3, 2011 (EDT)
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I picked up this Bodum 2 cup coffee press earlier this spring for a buck. 100_0658.jpg

It makes a great cup of joe and weights less that 6oz. I take it apart when packing, and store all my breakfast foods in it

10:56 a.m. on November 3, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm not above tossing a handful of coffee into my MSR Titan Kettle, letting it settle a minute and drinking it through my teeth!

5:18 p.m. on November 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Spike, drip line, and a tar pot (I like it strong and straight up!)


coffee.jpg
Ed

3:25 a.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Too funny Ed! I been looking for a system like that for years.

4:22 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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I am a self confessed coffee snob, and even on the trail I prefer using a press or other method that retains the wonderful oils and flavor. However, I have recently been opting for Via when I am trying to keep weight down. It makes a surprisingly drinkable cup of coffee. Compared to a pressed cup of just roasted unwashed Sidamo it is not that great; compared to much anything else that falls in the easy/instant category, it is pretty darn good.

I haven't tried JavaJuice yet, though it is said to be quite good. I think it might have an edge on via since it is not freeze-dehydrated.

I've also thought about making an extremely strong batch of cold pressed syrup to take along.  

8:53 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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If I could find a way to get my Rancilio Sylvia and MACAP grinder in my pack....well....just sayin.

9:06 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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IMG_0883.jpg

That would be my setup....if I could.

9:42 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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giftogab said:

If I could find a way to get my Rancilio Sylvia and MACAP grinder in my pack....well....just sayin.

Hey giftogab, After reading this post it just occurred to me that I have a friend in South America that will be relocating to the Everest area due to the United States Recession and the down turn in the coffee industry. His name is Juan, Juan Valdez and since he has a mule he has contracted himself and his mule to portage people up the mountain. It's been along time since I've talked to him but seems to me he has worked on coffee plantations for a good portion of his life. I bet I could get his email and see if he would be willing to get in touch with you.  He’s a nice guy always smiling and he always has good "coffee packing stories"...........any way I'd venture to say that he could take care of your high country coffee needs if you and he hit it off (good to have friends in high places, oh.......I cannot believe I just said that). Here's the last picture he sent me.


juan-valdez.jpg
His mule is named Conchita.  Seems that  Conchita  really, really  likes  Bud Light (go figure). I bet if your brought a can with you would be endeared to him forever. Any way just thought I'd throw that out there if your interested.

9:58 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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apeman said:

giftogab said:

If I could find a way to get my Rancilio Sylvia and MACAP grinder in my pack....well....just sayin.

Hey giftogab, After reading this post it just occurred to me that I have a friend in South America that will be relocating to the Everest area due to the United States Recession and the down turn in the coffee industry. His name is Juan, Juan Valdez and since he has a mule he has contracted himself and his mule to portage people up the mountain. It's been along time since I've talked to him but seems to me he has worked on coffee plantations for a good portion of his life. I bet I could get his email and see if he would be willing to get in touch with you.  He’s a nice guy always smiling and he always has good "coffee packing stories"...........any way I'd venture to say that he could take care of your high country coffee needs if you and he hit it off (good to have friends in high places, oh.......I cannot believe I just said that). Here's the last picture he sent me.


juan-valdez.jpg
His mule is named Conchita.  Seems that  Conchita  really, really  likes  Bud Light (go figure). I bet if your brought a can with you would be endeared to him forever. Any way just thought I'd throw that out there if your interested.

 Truth is, he is in the witness protection program. He was arrested for what was his TRUE business...the coca leaf. HE had a raging blow habit and agreed to testify against the cartel for their protection. Might account for your recent lack of contact with him.

10:03 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Or the fact that I just gave up his witness protection location.  Dang it, I hate when I do that!

10:44 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Bad form, fer shizzle, Ape!

8:38 a.m. on November 5, 2011 (EDT)
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S.B. VIA - HA!

Much rather save the money for some new or better gear


nes-caf-single.jpg


Folg-sing.jpg

If you have a bigger crowd, go with a filter packs.

I'm not gonna fault someone willing to carry their java kit on the trail. After all, hike your own hike. I'm just saying that unless I'm car camping with the family I'll be traveling as light as I can.

BUY LOCAL?? Unfortunately there are not too many US based coffee plantations.

Try bouillon cubes, in cold weather they are a good way to replenish electrolytes as well as warm up . Consider Wylers, a Heintz subsidary, USA based versus Knorr, Munich Germany.

AR

7:48 a.m. on November 6, 2011 (EST)
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Sorry, Anrolfe, but flavored coffee is nasty in my book. If the source and preparation are good quality, flavoring is just defiling the coffee ;)

9:50 a.m. on November 6, 2011 (EST)
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I am with Gonazan. As a former barista from back in the day where coffee mattered to the companies that roasted it, it was common knowledge that in order to get flavor infused in the bean, it had to soak until it was pretty much rotten and ruined from the additive. Hell, you can add a flavor to a cup and have much better coffee using Folgers and a bit of syrup. If the objective is just to get a hot drink in, water works great!

10:59 a.m. on November 6, 2011 (EST)
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Don't get me wrong, If I am on the trail, almost any coffee is welcome and better than none. My main objection to flavoring coffee is that the artificially introduced flavor completely masks and obliterates the inherent tastes and subtleties of the actual coffee. Each varietal has distinct flavors and aromas produced by variations in the plant, growth elevation, geology, rainfall, soil content, etc. For me, those shifts in taste are far more enjoyable and compelling than, say, processed butterscotch or razzledazzleberryblast.

:)

1:37 p.m. on November 6, 2011 (EST)
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Grind up some cocoa beans and blend it with your coffee, add surgar, and creamer. Mocha on the trail! Or you can take along some vanillia, or cinnamin, There are many light and natural ways to flavor your coffee.

7:04 p.m. on November 6, 2011 (EST)
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For those who care:

1) The pic of the mixed pack was simply added because it was the 1st I found on the web. I like my coffee hot and BLACK!

2) When on the trail, really on the trail, not just strolling around my local park or looking through outfitters catalogs picking out my "Next greatest and best gear" I will, and do pack as light as I can.

Unfortunately much of time as of late has been harnessed to a paint brush and a ladder. Today I was "on belay". I'm probably the only person on the block who uses security attachment points on their house and wears a Swiss seat while painting their dormers.

In closing, I thought that the coffee in Uncle Sam's MRE's was fine! Anything else is even better.

Instant Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, Bouillon, Soup.......

AR

11:10 p.m. on November 6, 2011 (EST)
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Picked up a plastic French press/travel mug combo that makes [I think] 16oz a shot.  It isn't for the ultralighters, but it isn't too much luxury weight for the rest of us pleasurehounds.  I think someone makes it for Starbucks.  Picked it up at Target for like $3 several years ago.  Makes a very nice cup.

7:06 p.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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like this?


Bodum-coffee-press.jpg

7:21 p.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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That's the one I've got. French roast!

8:29 p.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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anlrolfe, yes, that's the one I have.

3:53 p.m. on November 9, 2011 (EST)
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Gonzan - Java juice is good, but lacks the acidity of via.  It's plush, rich, and sweet, but it's so low-acid that I'm thinking it must be a cold extract.  Then again, it's much easier to shoot a packet of Java Juice than it is with a packet of via!

I'd really encourage you to experiment with homemade cold extracts though.  You can make a very concentrated one easily, and for short trips you don't have to worry about oxidation.  Sometimes I'll add 1/8 teaspoon brandy as a preservative!

12:22 p.m. on November 10, 2011 (EST)
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Thanks for the info and suggestions, Seth. I am always up for trying new ways to improve my backcountry coffee experience :)

I was thinking I would experiment with altering standard cold brew methods to get the results I was looking for.Would you be willing to share your cold extraction method?  The brandy idea is great!

2:50 p.m. on November 10, 2011 (EST)
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Seth said:

..Sometimes I'll add 1/8 teaspoon brandy as a preservative!

 A practice I use on my person - didn't realize it would work on coffee too.

Ed

 

6:26 p.m. on November 15, 2011 (EST)
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anlrolfe said:

like this?


Bodum-coffee-press.jpg

 Looks like a water filter too

July 31, 2014
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