Chinese One Road Star Fire153g stove CAUTION

7:55 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
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I must caution users of this stove.

Having used my Chinese One Road Star Fire153g stove once in the field with good success, I decided that I would take it with me last weekend on a three day snowshoe trip to the Australian High country, for some reason just before I left I decided to give the stove a test in my garage, the stove started up all right but after a few seconds the flame died to just a small pilot light size, what the hell was going on, so after trying another canister I started to pulled the stove apart, when I removed the jet some black powder fell out of the jet base, on closer inspection I noticed the sintered bronze filter was blocked with this black powder. I was guessing that the fuel line is made from rubber or something similar as it is very flexible for a fuel line and that operating the stove in liquid gas configuration in cold conditions caused the inside of the fuel line to disintegrate.

If I had not have tested this stove before I left I would have been in some trouble as it was very cold and when I needed to cook and melt water for drinking, it was evening and I was a full days walking from the nearest exit point.

I packed my trusty old Coleman Extreme stove which performed as usual, except on one very cold morning I could not get a strong flame going, I had to warm the canister a bit with my hands.

I have just pulled the fuel line off and as expected it “is” made from a black rubbery type material, I have manage to clean the particles out of the stove and it is now working normal but I will replace the fuel line with Cole Parmer PFA tubing which I know is capable of handling cold liquid gas.

Another minor problem with the One Road stove was that in liquid gas mode it took a long time for the stove to die after it was turned off, as I guessed this is because the fuel line does not have a piece of o-ring cord inside to reduce the volume.

While I like the stove and will persist with it, as I have the knowledge and equipment to modify this stove, I would not recommend this stove until the company changes the fuel line to one that can handle cold liquid gas.


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Tony

9:51 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
81 reviewer rep
422 forum posts

Hi, Tony,

Thanks for the warning!

I'm always a little suspicious of Chinese manufactured stove equipment precisely because they take short cuts like the inferior tubing on your stove.  I'm glad you caught this before your trip!

Having said that, I have purchased Chinese manufactured stove equipment such as a bayonet connector to threaded gas adapter and a gas tube similar to the one on your Star Fire (photos below).  The funny looking silver thing on the end of the hose is an adapter that allows the Chinese gas tube to mate with the Hank Roberts stove shown.  The Hank Roberts stove has a needle connector.

Of the three bayonet to threaded adapters I received, only one worked.  The other two leaked.  NOT RECOMMENDED.  The Kovea adapters from Korea are more expensive but are a good product.

Chinese bayonet to threaded adapter.  NOT recommended.
StraightAdapter.jpg

Gas tube for a Chinese S-9 stove (with custom adapter on the end).

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Gas tube used to connect a modern canister to an old Hank Roberts stove.
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The "needle" connector on an old Hank Roberts stove.
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I'll have to keep in mind to only take my Chinese manufactured stove equipment on trips where having a stove isn't critical.

HJ

10:06 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

I always check out my gear in great detail before I head out for a trip(this includes firing up the ol cooker.) Much better finding a problem at home than miles away from anything.

Thanks alot for posting this warning. The heads up is greatly appreciated. I personally do not use this stove but as I meet people on the trail who is to say that I won't meet someone who does...

11:54 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
81 reviewer rep
422 forum posts

And always hook up a gas stove and try running the gas without a flame first.  I hook everything up and listen for leaks.  Assuming everything is OK, I open the valve and listen for gas.  Then I close the valve.  If everything passes the "pre-fire check," then I try firing up the stove.  In the case of the Chinese fuel adapters, I think that policy saved me from a potentially serious problem.  Leaking gas + flame = not good.

HJ

12:32 a.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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52 forum posts

hikin_jim said:

Hi, Tony,

Thanks for the warning!

I'm always a little suspicious of Chinese manufactured stove equipment precisely because they take short cuts like the inferior tubing on your stove.  I'm glad you caught this before your trip!

Having said that, I have purchased Chinese manufactured stove equipment such as a bayonet connector to threaded gas adapter and a gas tube similar to the one on your Star Fire (photos below).  The funny looking silver thing on the end of the hose is an adapter that allows the Chinese gas tube to mate with the Hank Roberts stove shown.  The Hank Roberts stove has a needle connector.

Of the three bayonet to threaded adapters I received, only one worked.  The other two leaked.  NOT RECOMMENDED.  The Kovea adapters from Korea are more expensive but are a good product.

I'll have to keep in mind to only take my Chinese manufactured stove equipment on trips where having a stove isn't critical.

HJ

 Hi HJ,

The actual quality of the machining seems very good, and the operation of the stove is was impressive but as you have mentioned a shortcut can turn a good product into an ordinary one.

Another potential problem that I removed the fuel line off the pre-heat tube rather easily, I have found is that there is no barb for the fuel line to grip onto, this could be very dangerous as if it comes off when in use it could cause a fire.


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Tony

12:37 a.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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52 forum posts

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

I always check out my gear in great detail before I head out for a trip(this includes firing up the ol cooker.) Much better finding a problem at home than miles away from anything.

Thanks alot for posting this warning. The heads up is greatly appreciated. I personally do not use this stove but as I meet people on the trail who is to say that I won't meet someone who does...

 Hi Rick,

I check my gear if I have any suspicions but if it is a tried and true bit of gear then I get a bit slack, I should make a policy of checking all of my gear.

Tony

12:48 a.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
119 reviewer rep
456 forum posts

TonyB, One question on the Chinese One Road Star Fire153g stove, is it "Rated" for liquid gas burn?  If the stove was only designed for running when the gas was in gases form, that might be part of the problem. 

Side Note:  I once was sodering some copper piping under a house and I knocked the gas canister over, normally this is not really an issue, but in this case the canister was actually inverted in a dip.  Liquid Mapp gas (Mixed Propane and Butane) is VERY cold, the 3' ruber flex line from the valve to the flame tip actually froze, or started to freeze, there was ice forming on the outside of the line!!  I shut off the valve very quickly, but if took almost 10 minutes for the flame to stop.  All the liquid in the line had to change to gas and then burn off before the flame went out.   Moral of the storyI now make sure the canisters are propped up so they can not invert.  I hate to think what would have happened if the line had broken and it had ignited! 

One Toasted Wolf!

Wolfman

2:01 a.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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52 forum posts

Wolfman said:

TonyB, One question on the Chinese One Road Star Fire153g stove, is it "Rated" for liquid gas burn?  If the stove was only designed for running when the gas was in gases form, that might be part of the problem. 

Side Note:  I once was sodering some copper piping under a house and I knocked the gas canister over, normally this is not really an issue, but in this case the canister was actually inverted in a dip.  Liquid Mapp gas (Mixed Propane and Butane) is VERY cold, the 3' ruber flex line from the valve to the flame tip actually froze, or started to freeze, there was ice forming on the outside of the line!!  I shut off the valve very quickly, but if took almost 10 minutes for the flame to stop.  All the liquid in the line had to change to gas and then burn off before the flame went out.   Moral of the storyI now make sure the canisters are propped up so they can not invert.  I hate to think what would have happened if the line had broken and it had ignited! 

One Toasted Wolf!

Wolfman

Hi Wolfman,

I do not know if the stove is rated for liquid gas burn, but the fuel line where it attaches to the valve does swivel, so so I assume it has been design for this use.

All camping stoves sold in Australia have to past stringent safety requirements to be approved for sale by the Australian Gas Association, I am sure this stove would not pass without some major modifications, I know this process can cost many thousands of dollars.

I make stoves and modify others over the years I have had a few scary moments with test hose coming off, seals not sealing, alcohol stoves getting knocked over etc.

Tony

October 24, 2014
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