Burn time

1:43 p.m. on September 3, 2011 (EDT)
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FYI - Just did a test of my MSR fuel bottle capacity burn time with my MSR Simmerlite Stove.

Fuel - White Gas, 20oz (measured)

Burns - 20 (i.e. 20 starts which require using fuel with no heating)

Average burn - 8.2 minutes (164 minutes)

2:07 p.m. on September 3, 2011 (EDT)
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1. What is your "Start" procedure?

2. Were these cold starts so you had to prime the stove?

3. What do you mean by "using fuel with no heating"? Just running the burner with fully open valve (or partially open, or what)?

3:31 a.m. on September 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Bill S said:

1. What is your "Start" procedure?

2. Were these cold starts so you had to prime the stove?

3. What do you mean by "using fuel with no heating"? Just running the burner with fully open valve (or partially open, or what)?

1.   

5 pumps on the pressure building pump

turn the fuel control knob all the way on and then immediately all the way off

use a Light My Fire FireSteel Scout 2.0 Fire Starter, single strike to fuel in gas burner

wait for flame to burn down to almost out then turn control knob on 1/2 to 3/4 a turn

2.

yes, these each were cold starts, i.e. the stove had not been used for hours prior and each were done at either early morning (breakfast) or late evening (dinner).  The the stove did need to heat up to vaporize the liquid fuel for correct operation.

3.

each start, a cold start, requires the use of some fuel from in the canister to heat the fuel feeder / vaporizing tube before the stove can operate correctly and until then the pot is not on the stave, therefore no heating (of pot)

5:54 p.m. on September 4, 2011 (EDT)
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To have any use for the fuel capacity I need something more. Is this test done in California in the summer, where the water temp is close to 20c or in Alaska where the water temp is close to 8c?

What I like to know when packing for a trip is how much fuel I need based on the number of persons that use the stove and the terrain and conditions for the use. In winter I need to melt snow for water, in summer not. In any way I take an ounce of fuel extra in a separate botlle, just to be on the safe side.

What is your pro person and day consumption of fuel? That is the capacity I need for my use!

12:51 a.m. on September 5, 2011 (EDT)
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Temperature and altitude does not affect the speed of burning the pressurized fuel coming out of the canister,  that has the same pressure differential to atmosphere no matter the altitude and same control valve setting.

The fuel comes out of the canister and burns.  The effect of altitude and temperature will determine the efficiency of the burn/heating.

Yes, it will take more time to boil cold or frozen water at altitude, (volume changes timing also), than at sea level on a hot summers day.  This is where you need to use some thought and or investigation for boiling water at altitude.  What food will you take and how much, for example.

I was just burning fuel, with two constants,

1. same valve opening position as I use no matter where

and

2. same pressure differential from atmosphere to canister no matter where

i.e. no matter, Longitude, Latitude, Altitude.

So let me google that for you,

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=boiling+water+at+altitude

October 24, 2014
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