VINTAGE PIVETTA DMC HIKING BOOTS--MINT CONDITION $399

5:09 p.m. on July 15, 2011 (EDT)
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My husband purchased Pivetta DMC hiking boots in the early '70's for recreational hiking.  But due to his flat feet, he put less than 20 miles on them, if that, and they've been sitting in the back of the closet all this time.  

I've read this website for information on Pivettas and they seem to be the Gold Standard for hiking boots.    The size stamped in red says "AA 10". 

I have attached a few photos...

Pivetta-Boots-001.jpg
Pivetta-Boots-002.jpg
Pivetta-Boots-004.jpg
Pivetta-Boots-006.jpg
Pivetta-Boots-005.jpg





The asking price is $399.   Let me know if anyone is interested...also posted on  Craigslist for Portland, Oregon.

 

12:44 p.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I had a pair of the same boots that I put a lot of miles on back in the 70s-80s--finally got such a severe curl in the front that I couldn't use them anymore.  Nice boots, but for the price you're asking, one can buy brand new Limmer Standards (current gold 'standard'?)for less if one is looking for heavy-duty leather boots.

1:07 p.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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What is the "AA" designation?   I know it is NOT double-narrow.

Clark-E ... what is your husband's street-shoe size?

                                               ~r2~

1:33 a.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I am curious about the less than 20 miles due to the wear on the soles as well as the way leather has relaxed in the area right before the toe box. $399 seems pretty high imho.

3:44 p.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Thank you for the replies...

Karmantra---  I googled Pivetta boots to determine an asking price and found this website where many of your members have posted comments about the priceless quality of Italian-made Pivetta boots and that they are now unavailable.   I understand that there are many quality hiking boots available and I guess, that's the key--available.   From what I am reading, Pivetta boots are unavailable.   So I googled for quality hiking boots and that seemed to be the range for highest quality hiking boots.

 

Robert--He wore a street size 10...he does not have narrow feet.  

 

Rick---I'm fairly certain it's less than 20 miles.   My husband has always had "bad feet" due to flat feet and neuropathy so regular walking places a huge strain on his feet.   He bought these because they were the best quality at the time but completely wrong for what the intended use... we did short hiking/walking in Los Angeles foothills and on a trip to Yosimite, and that's about it.   But you guys are the experts and it was a long, long time ago. 

So what price does your Hiking Community think would be fair?

 

4:29 p.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I have noticed the reference to them sitting in the back of the closet for quite a long time... Uggghhhhhh....

As a suggestion I would treat them with some type of leather treatment asap(I swear by Obenhauf's and believe an oil treatment followed by a treatment of Heavy Duty LP would help tremendously.) This should help get the leathers natural oil back into them. I would pay a great deal of attention to the flex points towards the front of the boot. The leather looks like it could use a bit of "nourishment."

Potential buyers are more interested in boots that have been looked after. All leather boots require maintenance. Leather boots can dry out and crack if not properly maintained. If this happens the boots are typically toast and a replacement is the best solution. From what I see in the pics I do not believe that they are to this point and with a slight bit of effort could be brought back to life. Which in return would most certainly fetch you a higher dollar amount.

I am not a pro at this at all, although there are members here that have worked in the industry I myself have not. I just know from years of trial and error and 1000s of dollars spent what works and what doesn't. My go to boots are and always will be full leather models without gore-tex, etc. I have owned so many over the years I can't even remember most of them.

Pivettas are nice boots and are highly respected.  As far as what they are worth, well that is something I really can't get into because I honestly have no clue. For someone who is going to use them it could be one price. If you can find a collector the price may go up. The main thing to potential buyers is "what kind of shape are they in?" or "How well have they been maintained?" This is what justifies the cost. If the boots are in shabby shape noone is going to spend a substantial amount of money on them.

This may be more of a niche thing if ya know what I mean.

Do you by any chance have any recollection of what they cost originally?

7:15 p.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I actually left a word out on my last post. It was supposed to read:

"I am not a pro at this at all, although there are members here that have worked in the industry I myself have NOT."

Sorry about that. I am beginning to think that I do not multi-task well.

9:57 p.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm interested in finding a pair of boots just like these, but the price is far out of what I consider fair market value.  Sometimes people don't actually want to sell things.  I've done the same, so that isn't a dig.  I've priced items at the very highest I've ever seen them sell, more with the intent of the remote possibility of finding that "one in a million" buyer who can't control themselves and who will buy without thought.  Chances are, I'm not going to find that person, so I'm perfectly fine with the item not selling.  It's only worth it to me to sell the item if I can get a ridiculous price.  Otherwise, I'm fine with it going back in the box or back in the closet.

I know this is arguable, but I feel the best gauge to market value is eBay.  Sure, there are spikes in both direction, but the greatest number of people having access to an item on a regular, or semi-regular, basis is more likely to set a fair price.  I see boots of this quality sit on eBay and not sell for $100.  Some sell for $30.  Some sell for $150.  Someone listed a pair of mint vintage Scarpas for $750 Buy It Now, hoping for the scenario I mentioned above.  When they relisted the boots, I believe it was at $475.  Then $450.  Then $350.  My bet is that they won't sell at any 3-digit price...unless they try an auction and bidders get in a war.  I guess my point is to watch eBay and to check completed auctions for Pivetta.  You might end up throwing them back in the closet once you see the going prices.

I'm interested, and they happen to be my size.

7:09 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm still not clear on the Pivetta width-sizing (any model).

A  = what?

AA= what?

What would a WIDE (USA term) be?

Reason?  I wear a 9W ( or 9E)

                                                    ~r2~

11:24 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I know with Scarpa the wide is a BXX as opposed to the standard BX on the M3. Not sure if that helps or makes things more confusing.

12:35 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Aahhhh ....   Hmmmm....

Well ... I AM now more cornfused ....

My Fabiano's have "F" as a suffix.   Just looked in a couple pairs of my Italian loafers -- nothing that tells me anything about width; just the Euro / metric specific sizing (42 / 43 / etc.).   Of course, the Italian loafers ALL are snug when new.   The leather is buttery-soft, and eventually stretches to conform to the shape of the foot.   I will say these Italian loafers ALL have very thin leather soles.  Weird.   Maybe, one of the reasons they are soooo comfortable.   Can  really feel when you tread on a large pebble.


 
                                                     ~r2~

12:49 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Thank you for all the thoughtful information.   My husband takes extraordinary care of his belongings.... I think the photos show the excellent condition.  

I myself abuse my shoes/clothes and unfortunately own nothing "vintage".  

I clarified with my husband he wore a 10-C if that helps.  

Well, thank you for your help...I will sell them on E-Bay for the right price or donate to Goodwill and take the deduction:-)

So long, fellas!!

 

1:26 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Clark-E, the very 1st picture you posted of both boots if you look at the boot on the right you can see where the leather in the flex points is dry. That is why the leather has that "flakey" look. It leads me to believe that they sat in that closet all that time untouched. Even if a boot isn't worn in time they still need a lil love. Different humidity levels in the home, as well as different temp levels can have an impact on leather over a long period. The oils in the leather dries over time, the leather cracks and you are left with a boot that is headed for that boot pile in the sky.

You stated they were from the early 70s. Even if that was 1975 that makes them 36yrs old. You cannot expect a boot to sit in the back of a closet for that amount of time without any care of the leather. Leather has natural oils in it that does dry out. Hence the reason why there are a plethora care products on the market. I know people who have boots that have been worn every year that is around the same age as the boots that you have pictured. With a few resoles over the years they are still kicking but they will tell you as well leather needs to be treated regularly in order to stay in tip top condition.

I am not sure of your familiarity with what a boot in "excellent" condition really is but the pic above tells me they are not but with a little love they can be. Take them to a cobbler and have him take a look at them. I think you may get an eye opener to exactly what you have going on there as well as a chance of finding out what they may be worth.

 As Zeno stated, there are auctions but at the point of sale you will be paying catalog fees etc out of the money you get from them.

2:52 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I don't know if this will help on your pricing at all, but I just bought a pair of little used (not broken in yet nor waxed) Pivetta Eights from a memeber here on Trailspace for $35 + $15 ship for a total of $50.

3:21 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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apeman said:

I don't know if this will help on your pricing at all, but I just bought a pair of little used (not broken in yet nor waxed) Pivetta Eights from a memeber here on Trailspace for $35 + $15 ship for a total of $50.

 Did ya by any chance ever get in touch with Dave Page regarding your Lowas? Those boots are awesome. I just love the look of an older heavy boot.

4:09 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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If anyone has a pair of Pivettas in sizes 9.5, 10, or 10.5, I'm interested.  Please message or email me.

4:36 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey Rick,  I did not as of yet get ahold of Dave Page in regards to my Lowas.  After twenty years of thinking about them it my be that their just to stiff (they have very little flex) for trail hiking and back packing and were mainly designed for Ice climbing in a mountaineering sence.  I'll prob do that during the winter months.  I just couldn't pass up the Eights.  I was looking into a pair of Danners for the same price but they were just a smig to big when he offerd me the Eights for the same price.  It may be that they don't fit, but in the event that they don't, I'll just sell them to get my money out of them and continue the search.

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