v-section anchors & numb toes

9:35 p.m. on February 19, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Hi again!

Just thought I'd post a couple of follow-ups from way back... I did make a couple of my v-section anchors out of standard hardware store aluminium (aluminum for the US guys and gals :-) and took them with me up some climbs in Japan... had no problems with them at all. Spent a couple of days throwing everything at them on Ibuki-yama (a friendly mountain behind my house in Japan) before I went onto anything serious. Now I won't claim to have scientifically tested them, but they seemed to hold as well as the Coyote I had with me (unscientifically speaking). A visit to ISHI mountain sports (Japanese mountain climbing shop) showed up a proliferation of v-section anchors... I was not alone in this config.! Whilst from your emails I see in the US most of you only use t-section, I now know Japan, NZ and Australia all use the v-section on a reg. basis. Anyway... just thought you'd like to know I didn't kill myself :-)

Numb toes... OK... so after all the posts on this... mine are *&^%! numb again (have been for nearly two weeks now after a few weekends of good climbing) and I am pissed off. Not only are they numb to the touch, they are bluddy painful from 'inside'... like I have crushed toes or something. SOmetimes they wake me up in the night (assuming they let me go to sleep). When you touch them however, there's no sensation on the skin. Circulation seems fine (now). This is horrible and I wish they would get better.

What is the verdict? Should I invest in another pair of boots? (I have leather La Sportivas) Plastics maybe? With more room in the toe box. Perhaps mine are too tight over my toes? Any ideas anybody?

Ugh!
Alan.

4:27 a.m. on February 20, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Alan,

Thanks for the follow up.

Yepper on the V section pickets. All my pickets are V pickets or V cable pickets. Made them all myself. Used em for years. Bomber.

On the toes. Got mine on both feet frost nipped on Denali. Mostly recovered but still insensate on the inside (medial) surface of both toes and the nail on my LHS second keeps sloughing whenever it gets to normal length. The price we pay??

Cheers,

Macca

9:48 a.m. on February 20, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. chuck, Chuck_C, c_claude

See a doc about the toes. It probably is residuals from frostbite, thats one thing. Love my leathers but when its really cold (below 0F)I go with plastics. If it wasn't frostbite then it could be what I call toe-bang (not knowing a better term). Got mine on my first trip this year when I was climbing ice with between 1cm-7cm of ice on the rock and both my crampons and my ice axes kept hitting rock. By the end of the day my left toe was black and blue (and my boots have a good fit since it hasn't happened since) and both palms of my hands were bruised black and blue due to my axes always hitting the rock.

11:06 p.m. on February 20, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

result?

Quote:

On the toes. Got mine on both feet frost nipped on Denali. Mostly recovered but still insensate on the inside (medial) surface of both toes and the nail on my LHS second keeps sloughing whenever it gets to normal length. The price we pay??


Is this a result of nerve damage, killed cells or what? Some people say that the numbness comes and goes which is very confusing to me.

4:01 a.m. on February 21, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

No idea

Quote:

Quote:

On the toes. Got mine on both feet frost nipped on Denali. Mostly recovered but still insensate on the inside (medial) surface of both toes and the nail on my LHS second keeps sloughing whenever it gets to normal length. The price we pay??


Is this a result of nerve damage, killed cells or what? Some people say that the numbness comes and goes which is very confusing to me.

1:57 p.m. on February 28, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

numb toes and womens boots

Hi,

I posted about numb toes over a month ago. They became numb on Dec 31st and they are numb to this date. However, they are making improvments. My right foot is close to normal. The little toes on my left foot are coming out of it but my big ones are still pretty numb - especially between them. But, though it's been slower than I thought, I'm confident that I will regain full feeling in all of them.

On a similar topic, to prevent this from happening in the future, i am going to buy some crampon compatible mountineering boots to replace the leather hikers i've been using on snow the past 5 years. I don't want to go with plastic cause i want the flexibility of using them on rocks. Does anyone know of a store in northern california that would have a 'large' selection? Large would be more than 2 models of womens boots.
Thanks
Carol

8:31 p.m. on March 2, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

rock shoes the culprit?

My rock shoes are fairly tight. Someone else has suggested that it is this that causes the persistent insensate areas not the frostnip, and that I may have just not noticed it before the frostnip episode.

Quite possible I guess that the frostnip caused major nerve damage that recovered but that what's left was there before.

Macca

11:50 a.m. on March 7, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

numb toes

I missed the bit about which toes, sorry. BUT, if they are the 3rd and 4th toes (middle and next to little toe) you might have Morten's Neuropathy. A pinch/crushing of the nerve passing through the ball of the foot servicing those toes. Starts out with a feeling like a small pebble in your boot on the underside of ball of the foot, then pain in toes and finally numbness. If you continue to abuse that nerve there is future bad news.

Too tight boot/shoe is normally the culprit. Can help it a bit by putting padding between affected toes and/or loosening up the lacing. Other option (other than new boots), is skipping first couple of lower eyelets for lacing. Might need orthonics, too.

September 3, 2014
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