designing a perfect gear room

8:29 a.m. on March 4, 2002 (EST)
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Now that Dave and I have bought our own house to keep our ever-growing amount of outdoor gear in we're planning on converting a second floor unfinished room (basically an attic) into a gear room (and longer-term an exercise room with bouldering wall). Yes, it would be nicer if it was on the first floor, but at least it's directly above the mud room.

Does anyone have suggestions/tips for storing and organizing ice/rock climbing gear along with our share of backpacking/hiking gear? Any dream gear room designs out there? Right now things are stored in bins or leaning against the wall, which does not satisfy my obsessive compulsive need for order.

6:03 p.m. on March 4, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Reconsider, again, first floor, with a door direct to outside. concrete slap or deck immediately outside, back truck up directly to gear room. But, if your working on stronger legs for mntring, 2nd floor is good.

Lots of shallow shelves on the walls, lots of bike hooks for hanging packs, sleeping bags, etc. table and chairs (work bench) in the center of room.

Very good ventilation, mildew prevention.

9:11 p.m. on March 4, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Gotta idea...

Actually, above the mud room is perfect. This is a multi-part plan. First, cut a big hole through the floor connecting the mud room and the gear room. Place a fireman's-pole going from the 2nd floor to the mud room. Trust me. I have always wanted to do this and I have done both scientific and errrr...well, I have not done any research but it really really would be cool. 2nd--build a nice route from the mud room, up the wall, over the overhang, and into the 2nd floor continuing up the wall. Build the wall on a chain system so that you can adjust the angle of overhang for different workouts.

Now, on the other wall, get a few old metal futon frames and hang them vertically, one after the other, sticking out from the wall kind of like those stores that show 50 posters on the vertical racks and you "flip" through them. Hang your gear on those. Ultra cool.

3rd, and VERY important. Hook up a killer stereo system.

4th. Since I use chauk, rig up a vent system--if you have a window, cool, but you will still need to install an exhaust system. You will invariable have friends over (where do you live? ;-)) and things get hot and sweaty.

5th. Rethink that bar downstairs. Seriously. A keg-a-rator would be a good idea--and upgrade the bar-b-q.

10:40 a.m. on March 5, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Quote:

Does anyone have suggestions/tips for storing and organizing ice/rock climbing gear along with our share of backpacking/hiking gear? Any dream gear room designs out there? Right now things are stored in bins or leaning against the wall, which does not satisfy my obsessive compulsive need for order.

Go nuts with pegboard. It's ugly, but you can paint it funky first.
Cheers,
Christian :?)

10:54 a.m. on March 5, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Nobody has mentioned it yet, so I'll bring it up. You might want to consider whether or not you want windows. I try to avoid letting my gear sit in the sun, when it is "resting" between trips....

Cheers,
D

12:39 p.m. on March 5, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

I have a house without a garage(a mistake i will never make again). Nontheless, i have learned to utilize my truck really well. I have built a platform elevated underneath with 2x8 boards. I can store 3-4 pairs of skis underneath, along with poles, 3 pairs of boots. On top of the platform there is tons of room for other bins full of gear, but still plenty of room to sleep 2 people.

The only thing i'm adamant about is that my sleeping bags are stored unstuffed. in my case, thats on the guest bed, to my wifes dismay. Come to think of it, my whole house is one big gear closet...tent in the master bedroom, sleeping bags on guest bed, tons of gear downstairs in 2 different rooms!

WHAT! come to think of it you cant have ONE ROOM, yer nutz. Use the WHOLE HOUSE!!!! and car, and dog house, and kids lockers at school and....

Quote:

Now that Dave and I have bought our own house to keep our ever-growing amount of outdoor gear in we're planning on converting a second floor unfinished room (basically an attic) into a gear room (and longer-term an exercise room with bouldering wall). Yes, it would be nicer if it was on the first floor, but at least it's directly above the mud room.

Does anyone have suggestions/tips for storing and organizing ice/rock climbing gear along with our share of backpacking/hiking gear? Any dream gear room designs out there? Right now things are stored in bins or leaning against the wall, which does not satisfy my obsessive compulsive need for order.

4:47 p.m. on March 5, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: ultimate gear room

davis,
you truly have the ultimate gear room idea. the firemans pole serves double duty as gear chute. way to go. best of luck with that. the chalk exhaust is key.

5:54 p.m. on March 5, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Amusing topic!

Something I reckon is necessary is somewhere to hang out your tent when you get back for those times where it gets packed wet. Hopefully somewhere that the cat can't tear it up or chew on the guy wires.

Similarly for airing sleeping bags. I can't leave mine about or the cat will burrow into them and dig her claws through the fabric so I lay them out across the top of a cupboard. A rod or cord mounted in the attic would be good. (But I don't have an attic... lucky you!) If it's got a high enough ceiling can you rig a pulley to get them right up out of the way?

Hooks and cords, get lots of hooks and cords.

I dunno about storing ice tools in an attic, I'm trying to convince my other half that we should hang them on the wall in the living room. She is still getting over the idea that I have a bicycle in every room except the bathroom (you can't put a bike in there as the steel will rust) and I have one in the shed too... but it _is_ rusting.

What about an indoor ice wall? Now I bet you'd get lots of visitors for that!

How about a drying cupboard to put your soggy boots and wet weather gear? (Just take a side channel from the central heating into a cupboard and there you have it!)

You could also get a chest of little drawers to put all those tiny things which always get misplaced between trips... spare screws for crampons and tools, the tiny wire thing to clean the stove nozzle, the stove repair kit bits and pieces, spare buckles for packs etc.

I better stop here before I get tempted to move to a new house with space for such things!

Have fun!

Alan.

2:02 p.m. on March 6, 2002 (EST)
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Thanks!

Thanks for all of the good suggestions. I admit that I had thought a climbing wall up from the mud room to the gear room would be pretty cool too.

There's a lot to think about, but hopefully someday my gear will be (somewhat) contained in one area of the house.

-alicia

5:06 p.m. on March 6, 2002 (EST)
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Gear area

The Old Greybeard and his eternally youthful bride have long since made the entire house into a gear area. The front room (where you enter the house) is the ski/pole/snowshoe area, along with maps on the walls and the USGS quads stacked up on the tables. Garage is the tent-drying, stove (all 16 of them), and bicycle (6 of those plus the rollers, tools, spare wheels, etc) storage area (we normally have a pretty dry climate in the SFBay area), Young Son's former bedroom is the sleeping bag/pad/other down and insulated gear area (store everything unstuffed), another bedroom is the pack/climbing gear area plus guidebook library. The "master bedroom" includes all the other climbing/skiing/cycling/snorkelling/etc attire. We do have a computer area, but that includes the computerized map software, so it is part of the woodsy atmosphere as well. Oh, I left out the "living room" which has the ice tools hanging over the fireplace plus climbing photos on the walls. I don't know why I should build a climbing wall in this climate (real rocks are real close for bouldering), plus there are two gyms close by, one within 2 miles and the other about 6 miles.

3:15 p.m. on March 11, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

boxes!

Not the most elegant solution, but my gear room (a spare bedroom converted to a gear room) has alot of boxes that sit on the floor. Each box is for a single "thing", mostly clothes. One for shells, one for tops,...bottoms, socks, hats, bivy sacks, sleeping bags, stoves, skins, ect.

Yeah, all of this could be in drawers (and it use to be), but this way I can see everything. if i can see it, i will forget it. packing for a trip is reduced to going to each box and picking out what i need. unpacking from a trip is just tossing stuff into boxes. wet stuff dries quickly.

rock gear in one heap, aid gear in another, ropes in another, packs in another. Expensive winter bags hang from the ceiling. I do have two shelf-like things along the wall to hang tools, crampons...shoes and boots sit on these shelves.

Form follows function.....and for me function is keeping my stuff organized w/ the least amount of work possible.

 


Quote:

Now that Dave and I have bought our own house to keep our ever-growing amount of outdoor gear in we're planning on converting a second floor unfinished room (basically an attic) into a gear room (and longer-term an exercise room with bouldering wall). Yes, it would be nicer if it was on the first floor, but at least it's directly above the mud room.

Does anyone have suggestions/tips for storing and organizing ice/rock climbing gear along with our share of backpacking/hiking gear? Any dream gear room designs out there? Right now things are stored in bins or leaning against the wall, which does not satisfy my obsessive compulsive need for order.

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