Mt. Rainier

9:43 p.m. on March 9, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

I am planning on climbing Mt. Rainier this summer. I have Salomon Super Mountain 9 Guides and am wondering if these will be warm enough. The guide service rents Koflach Degres and recommends plastic boots. Any thoughts. Thanks.

11:44 a.m. on March 10, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

A few thoughts:

Every one is different, so whats warm enough for me might not do for you. Warm is a relative term.

That being said I climb in SG9's and have been on Rainer in winter and summer in my SG9's. They are a tad warm for true summer (for me) but they go if I am taking my rigid pons.

Also, it is always best to klimb in your own boots (you know, the boots that you know fit your feet).

For summer temps I prefer my uninsulated Montana's

YMMV
Smoker

8:19 p.m. on March 11, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

I also have tentative plans to climb Rainier in June. I'll be wearing my Boreal Super Latok's (insulated, waterproof leather mtneering boots). Thought about maybe needing plastic's, too, but just cannot see the need for them, especially if you have a decent leather boot (such as your SM 9's as well).


Quote:

I am planning on climbing Mt. Rainier this summer. I have Salomon Super Mountain 9 Guides and am wondering if these will be warm enough. The guide service rents Koflach Degres and recommends plastic boots. Any thoughts. Thanks.

7:35 p.m. on March 23, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

I used to work for RMI. I would suggest going with the plastics. You'll be warmer and happier. Hope you enjoy your climb!

Quote:

I am planning on climbing Mt. Rainier this summer. I have Salomon Super Mountain 9 Guides and am wondering if these will be warm enough. The guide service rents Koflach Degres and recommends plastic boots. Any thoughts. Thanks.

4:23 p.m. on March 25, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

IMHO - that will be plenty of boot. I climbed Rainier in July with my uninsulated Makulus and never even thought about the cold. Of course, if you normally have cold feet when others don't, you may want to consider the plastics. Not to start a pissing contest or anything, but I don't care for the plastics, and I really don't care for wearing somebody else's boots.

Quote:

I am planning on climbing Mt. Rainier this summer. I have Salomon Super Mountain 9 Guides and am wondering if these will be warm enough. The guide service rents Koflach Degres and recommends plastic boots. Any thoughts. Thanks.

4:34 p.m. on May 30, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Gorge Hiker

It isn't so much a matter of warmth, but also important is how dry you will be able to keep your feet. Plastics help keeping your foot dry, but don't prevent the sloppy snow from sneaking in.

They do usually dry faster, however, so you can pull out the liners at a rest stop or at camp and reduce the chilling effects of accumulated water in your footwear. Dry socks doesn't hurt too.

Yes, plastics are a pain for walking on rocks. If you are going to walk a long distance before reaching snow, you might bring some light footwear that could double as camp footwear for the approach. Otherwise take precautions to keep from trashing your feet on the approach.

1:04 p.m. on September 16, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

I have climbed Rainier in all seasons of the year. In only the coldest winter conditions will I wear plastics (I use Koflach Artic Expeditions). But from spring until Fall, a good pair of leather boots is the way to go. (I am currently wearing Sportiva K2's) The key is keeping them waterproofed with a heavy wax. I would suggest waterproofing them before any big climb.

If anyone has more information on the new Technica Altitude Pluses, let me know. I am considering buying a pair, but would love to hear from someone who owns them.

thanks.

July 25, 2014
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