mountaineering

12:31 p.m. on April 10, 2002 (EDT)
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I am 22 New Yorker and looking to start some mountaineering, I have been backpacking for a long time now aand want to get into mountaineer, but do not know anyone to show me the ropes and hit the mountain with me. Any one who know any clubs in NY or interested, email me.

11:45 p.m. on April 10, 2002 (EDT)
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Go to your neighborhood EMS (look in the yellow pages, and yes there are some in the NYC area), wander into the climbing section, and ask the scruffiest clerk you see. Look on the bulletin board. Appalachian Mountain Club is a good place to start. Drive up to NH to the general vicinity of the White Mountains (Presidentials in particular), and you will find several shops and guide services. Pick up copies of Climbing and Rock&Ice magazines and look at the ads for guide services and instruction in the back.

Hundreds of places to get taught. Just look around.

10:33 a.m. on April 11, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Different Opinion

Quote:

Go to your neighborhood EMS, wander into the climbing section, and ask the scruffiest clerk you see.

$ Not that I know anything about back east or EMS but, I dont think this has anything to do with finding a qualified guide. But I know what you mean, we have a sellmans who has a ponytail, is a naturalist and uses no body de-orderant but has no idea and us clean cut types (but changing) with not your typical german / swiss guide body types are rarely thought of.

Quote:

Appalachian Mountain Club is a good place to start.

$ I hope they are better than our club who although have grand ego's and can talk the talk, no very little about climbing and worse, cant pass the info along.

Quote:

Pick up copies of Climbing and Rock&Ice magazines and look at the ads for guide services and instruction in the back.

$ Those who advertise most may not be the best.

Quote:

Hundreds of places to get taught. Just look around.

$ I still beleive in independent guides and personal intruction or a mentor who will drag and teach all they know. Its hard to find one.

Belay-Off
The Barking Dawg

2:16 p.m. on April 11, 2002 (EDT)
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yeah, well ...

Quote:

$ Not that I know anything about back east or EMS but, I dont think this has anything to do with finding a qualified guide. But I know what you mean, we have a sellmans who has a ponytail, is a naturalist and uses no body de-orderant but has no idea and us clean cut types (but changing) with not your typical german / swiss guide body types are rarely thought of.

Yeah, but he lives in NYC environs and said he has no clue where to start. EMS, at least, is an outdoor store that has shops all over the East, sells gear, has a bulletin board ("looking for partners" posts), and often has climbers hanging out there (and a lot of poseurs, wannabes, and never-has-beens - ya gotta talk to a lot of people).


Quote:

Quote:

Appalachian Mountain Club ... Climbing and Rock&Ice ... guide services
$ Those who advertise most may not be the best.

Those who advertise most may be the most desparate for business. The idea was to give him an idea of the huge number of resources available and get him looking. Hopefully, he won't just latch onto the first one he runs across.


Quote:

Quote:

Hundreds of places to get taught. Just look around.

$ I still beleive in independent guides and personal intruction or a mentor who will drag and teach all they know. Its hard to find one.

I agree both with the best choice being a competent independent guide/personal instructor/mentor, and that it is hard to find one. As I read his post, that is exactly his problem - he doesn't have the contacts yet. Gotta start somewhere, and if he checks out all the sources, maybe tries a few, and follows through with chasing the leads he gets that way, he will eventually find a mentor willing to drag him along. The club classes and guide services will at least teach him how to tie the knots, which end of the crampons to face forward on the boots, and (maybe) how to belay. But hopefully he will rapidly become aware that a lot of guide services teach just enough to haul someone up a mountain or route and try to generate lots of return business (so do some independent guides, and some of the clubs just want to generate lots of huge trips).

Not many people are lucky enough to know as competent and caring a guide as you, John, or even are acquainted with an Old Greybearded One like me (I don't think either of us is planning to go to NYC to do climbing instruction in the near future). So I tried to point him to local resources.

Only about 6 weeks until I'm up your way. Hope the airport security people don't blow up my boots (the local airport security people blew up a guy's shoes that had electric footwarmers yesterday, on suspicion they were bombs - I kid you not)

4:17 p.m. on April 11, 2002 (EDT)
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Battery powered shoes, you're kidding me Bill!

Worse than Jeff's battery powered jacket...what next?

5:34 p.m. on April 11, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

ADK-AMC mountaineering... and 1st A 2oo

Karen and JR at: http://www.alpineadven.com/ is a good start for rock and ice climbing. You can skip their backpacking/mountaineering classes.

AMC-Pinkham runs a Mountain Leadership School, a great way to learn advanced backpacking skill around Mt Washington (no the class doesn't climb this mt.).

ADK-AMC runs a joined class at Marcy and surrounding area, it is called "ADK-AMC Winter Mountaineering School". The advanced sections of this class actually do a winter climb on Marcy.

These are great starts and may be you can get network with the instructors and get more hardcore mountaineering info.
Oh, don't forget to look up SOLO and WMA for their first aid courses in the area. Good luck :-))

7:53 a.m. on April 15, 2002 (EDT)
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Quote:

I am 22 New Yorker and looking to start some mountaineering, I have been backpacking for a long time now aand want to get into mountaineer, but do not know anyone to show me the ropes and hit the mountain with me. Any one who know any clubs in NY or interested, email me.

Try Chauvin Guides in NH -- http://www.chauvinguides.com/. Far better than your average guide. Can give you anything from rock to ice to general mountaineering (summer or winter). I was a member of AMC's NY-NJ chapter, and unfortunately it's probably not the best place to go for instruction -- very hit or miss and the comment about big egos seems unfortunately common in the climbing/mountaineering level stuff.

1:25 p.m. on April 15, 2002 (EDT)
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No, I'm not kidding

Here's the story from the San Jose Mercury News -


Posted on Thu, Apr. 11, 2002

Wired shoes put salesman in hot seat at S.F. Airport

By Aaron Davis
Mercury News

A hot footwear fad forced a security lockdown at San Francisco International Airport on Wednesday, when puzzled security screeners stopped an international traveler carrying a pair of shoes wired with batteries and a heating device.

The FBI, San Francisco police and National Guard troops hurried to evacuate the checkpoint area and interrogate the man, who was heading from Shanghai, China, to New York.

Authorities soon realized they weren't dealing with a terrorist. They'd simply run across an enterprising shoe salesman who planned to introduce his homemade toe-warming footwear at a trade show in New York.

Within an hour, the 27-year-old man had missed his plane but was allowed to catch the next flight to New York. His shoes, however, stayed behind.

Just to be safe, San Francisco police blew them to pieces with a shotgun.

But nobody apologized for his loss.

``I don't feel funny about this at all,'' airport spokesman Ron Wilson said. ``Unless someone forgot, there were explosive devices found on the shoes of man on a plane just a few months ago. Our response was right on.''

It was the second time this year a threat of explosive-packed loafers affected passengers at San Francisco Airport.

In January, security screeners failed to stop a man whose loafers tested positive for explosives residue at a checkpoint. The passenger apparently boarded a flight without knowing he'd caused a two-hour evacuation that delayed hundreds of planes nationwide.

``This time everyone did it right,'' Wilson said. ``Police were notified immediately.''

Investigators were wary of the man's story at first, said FBI spokesman and special agent Andrew Black. Just before 9 a.m., a checkpoint screener had spotted wires and dark patches protruding from shoes inside the man's shoulder bag as it passed through an X-ray machine. Inside, police later found a pair of size 10 loafers loaded with batteries and heating coils.

The shoes were apparently part of a new wave of quirky, heated footwear, which has been mildly popular among winter sports enthusiasts for decades.

``In the 1970s it was the Lectra Sox; they're not a big seller anymore,'' said Brian Dallas, manager of Mel Cotton's Sporting Goods in San Jose. ``Some older folks with poor circulation still look for them. The exciting stuff now are companies building battery packs and heating units for ski boots.''

Nonetheless, Dallas questioned if shoes that can force an airport evacuation could ever be hot sellers.

``That's a drawback, I'd think,'' Wilson said.

The episode closed the security checkpoint near United Airlines' Gate 75 for more than an hour, but no flights were affected, Wilson said. Foggy weather, however, delayed more than 40 flights during the incident.

Passengers said the inconvenience was worth the wait.

``I'm not laughing, but I'm OK. I'm glad they found them first,'' said Padma Sribhar, who was returning to Newark, N.J., after a business trip -- her first time in a plane since Sept. 11. ``Of course this happened on my first flight.''

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