2-person assault tents...

7:11 p.m. on April 18, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

2 Questions....

* I'm looking for a 2 person, lightweight, snow tent. I'm currently considering either a Mountain Hardwear Trango-Assault or an MSR Fury (previously a Moss tent of some kind). Does anybody have any feedback on these? I've read all the on-line reviews I can find and they both sound great. A shop here is getting them in for me to look at shortly.

I'm wondering about the weight of the trango (it seems a little heavy for its size) and also the fact that its fly is nylon whilst the Fury is polyester which is what my other tents are made of. How is nylon when it's wet? Saggy or taut?

Snow camping in Australia ain't always so dry as snow-camping in Europe, Japan or USA I expect.

* Second question... I've little experience in setting up a tent on mixed terrain. I.e. I've pitched on snow, and I've pitched on earth/rocks. If you guys don't know what the tent-ledge is going to be covered in, how do you know which set of pegs to take? Previous experience with snow pegs on rock is... don't do it... you'll bend them all! Star-picket rock pegs are also useless in snow and I've just ended up sticking in axes, snow-pickets, trekking poles and everything I can make a dead-man out of instead. This is fine... unless you want to leave the tent up whilst you go climbing. What do you guys do?

Cheers... winter is nearly upon us down here!

Alan.

5:29 p.m. on April 19, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Paul, Paul R, Paul R., Paul Raphaelson, PR

I don't have experience with those two tents, but I have some thoughts for you on securing a tent on mixed ground.

First, anything that you can use as a deadman on snow can work on rock. Up high in most places i've been, you don't often find ground that you can bang stakes into. I often find myself tying off the middle of a stake (I use those old school chouinard stakes that are made of 7075 aluminum .. awesome if you can find them) and piling big rocks on top.

I also have a couple of small deadmen for snow use .. the only thing i've ever used them for is anchoring a tent, so i don't mind leaving them behind while climbing. They work equally well in snow and burried under heavy rock. only drawback is they're kind of heavy, but if you're going someplace where you might be on snow with high winds, they're worth it.

sometimes a piece of climbing pro will work if you have a crack in solid rock someplace handy. i've never had the opportunity to use an ice screw, but you might find one.

if you hiked your approach with a big pack but are continuing your climb with daypacks, your whole pack can make an excellent tent anchor. tie it of somewhere strong in the middle, bury it with lots of snow, and stomp til it's packed hard.

on snow probably the most important thing you can do is use the snow to protect the tent from high winds. on soft snow, just stomping out your tent platform will give you some snow wall around the tent that's effective at keeping wind from getting undeneath it and flying off the mountain like a kite. on hardpack, you can use a strong shovel and build a wall. when i do it it looks like the foundation of an igloo .. usually one that was built by the lowest bidder. not tidy, but it works.

as far as nylon vs. polyester, i've only owned nylon tents. it does get baggy when it's wet. my guess is polyester stays tighter, since it absorbs much less
water.

hope this helps,
Paul


Quote:

2 Questions....

* I'm looking for a 2 person, lightweight, snow tent. I'm currently considering either a Mountain Hardwear Trango-Assault or an MSR Fury (previously a Moss tent of some kind). Does anybody have any feedback on these? I've read all the on-line reviews I can find and they both sound great. A shop here is getting them in for me to look at shortly.

I'm wondering about the weight of the trango (it seems a little heavy for its size) and also the fact that its fly is nylon whilst the Fury is polyester which is what my other tents are made of. How is nylon when it's wet? Saggy or taut?

Snow camping in Australia ain't always so dry as snow-camping in Europe, Japan or USA I expect.

* Second question... I've little experience in setting up a tent on mixed terrain. I.e. I've pitched on snow, and I've pitched on earth/rocks. If you guys don't know what the tent-ledge is going to be covered in, how do you know which set of pegs to take? Previous experience with snow pegs on rock is... don't do it... you'll bend them all! Star-picket rock pegs are also useless in snow and I've just ended up sticking in axes, snow-pickets, trekking poles and everything I can make a dead-man out of instead. This is fine... unless you want to leave the tent up whilst you go climbing. What do you guys do?

Cheers... winter is nearly upon us down here!

Alan.

11:11 a.m. on April 20, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

The reason

most want and use an assult / bivy tent is light weight. I would suggest either #1 Integral Design MK or #2 the Bibler I - Eldorado tents. If want or must have a double walled tent, the Kelty (forgot its name) tent that looks just like the ID and Bibler would be my choice. MH stuff is nice but its way over made and super heavy for light wgt fanatics.

I rarely take stakes / pegs. I use either what nature provides (rocks, trees, brush, etc) or gear I must carry anyway (skis, ski poles, icetools, stuffsacks, pickets, etc.)

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The Barking Dawg

August 23, 2014
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