12 point crampons

1:27 p.m. on July 8, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Chef, Matt, Matthew, Matthew Cusack

I have seen there are a great variety of different crampons
and I have only used ones supplied in courses.
is there really a big differance between 10 and 12 point crampons? I am looking to do climbs like rainier and other mountains like???

7:24 p.m. on July 9, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

The lighter ones with fewer points are what you want for glacier travel (basic hiking on snow)on peaks like Rainier. The heavier ones with more points that also sometimes have vertically oriented frames rather than the horizontal ones the 10pt crampons have, are for steeper more technical climbs. Horizontal frames help keep wet snow from balling up - but rubber anti-snow plates are the ultimate for this. Don't waste your money on the heavy more expensive crampons w/ extra points unless you plan to climb steep routes that can involve ice, and may need to be protected while you climb with pickets and ice screws and such.

No other real difference besides weight and strength that I can see. For just snow sloging, and you want to go light, also consider the aluminum crampons, but they are not as durable, and are useless on ice - some people swear by them, but I haven't used them much.


Quote:

I have seen there are a great variety of different crampons
and I have only used ones supplied in courses.
is there really a big differance between 10 and 12 point crampons? I am looking to do climbs like rainier and other mountains like???

10:14 p.m. on July 9, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

S has outlined a lot of good "points". However, mountain condition can change from year to year. Up until last week, the D Cleaver is all snow, and high wind have exposed some icy patches at higher elevation. And there are all kind of conditions between hard snow and soft snow. When you're roping up at midnight, and the snow is as hard as ice, you may wish you have 12 sharp ones instead of 10 dull points. Besides, if you pick up ice-climbing in this coming winter, you may want to get a pair of Sabretooth or alike instead of some 10-pts. Don't forget, your boot system may limit or expand your option of your crampons. Keep your option open until you start your cold weather training this winter. Good luck :-)

9:55 a.m. on July 11, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Kevin Rooney

A couple of other thoughts:

- Some guide services require you to have 12 pointers (or better).
- 12 pointers provide more secure footing than 10 pointers as they tend to have longer tines. Because of this, you tend to trip more with 12's than with 10's.

Personally, I'd use 12's on Rainier.

 

Quote:

I have seen there are a great variety of different crampons
and I have only used ones supplied in courses.
is there really a big differance between 10 and 12 point crampons? I am looking to do climbs like rainier and other mountains like???

September 20, 2014
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