Few things about my last message

11:22 a.m. on July 31, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

I

6:01 p.m. on July 31, 2002 (EDT)
TOP 10 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,445 reviewer rep
5,389 forum posts
Barrabes "boycott"

What part of the article are you asking "if this is true"? Climbing Magazine and Rock&Ice have announced that they will no longer carry ads for the European dot-com climbing shops, Climbing in particular in an editorial in their issue a month or two back. And, yes, there was an article in the Wall Street Journal, as quoted in the link you gave. Climbing, and apparently now a couple of British climbing magazines, called for a "boycott" of the European dot-com shops (not just Barrabes), although more correctly, it was a call to "support your local climbing shop."

The reason ostensibly was that the Euro web shops are selling gear for far less than local shops, which potentially means that local shops will be unable to compete and could well go out of business. It seems that a lot of people go into the local mom&pop shop, ask lots of questions, try on the boots and clothing to get the right size, then head for their computer and order over the web. Some of these people are very open and even "in-your-face" about getting the info with no intention of buying anything from the local shop. Some are even reported to have bought from one of the Euro shops, then gone to a local shop to exchange for a different size or even demand a refund.

Another side is that there is indeed a large price differential, and given free markets, competition, and all that, why not buy where you get the best price? There have been claims made that the US importers and manufacturers of gear charge artificially inflated prices and have pressured the US stores, government, and magazines to promote the boycott in the interest of bigger profits.

I do not claim to know the true story of who does what to whom, but the Climbing magazine editorial was restricted to climbing gear, and said nothing about steel tariffs or boycotting any other goods. It only said that Climbing would not carry ads for the Euro dot-coms. I know people who have bought through the web, but these people also patronize (i.e., spend money at) their local shops. There is also the question of survival of local shops when a big chain (REI, EMS) moves in. In my area (SF Bay), we have 6 REIs, 2 Marmots, and 2 of a local shop Sunrise Mountaineering, and really not a lot more, well, ok, Any Mountain does carry a little bit of gear and a number of the climbing gyms have a corner that sells gear. We used to have a number of other small shops, plus shops that had a "climbing corner." But places like the Berkeley Ski Hut and Antelope are long gone.

I only scanned the article, but my impression is that it was mostly the usual contemporary version of "the news", that is, make it as controversial and sensational as possible, amplifying the screams of your local audience whose ox might be getting gored. There is truth there - several magazines writing editorials calling for their readers to buy from local shops rather than dot-coms and dropping ads from the dot-coms (not a big source of ad revenue, anyway, so no big loss in income for the mag). But climbing is still way too small a market to be of great concern to international trade and the balance of payments.

5:08 a.m. on August 1, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Barrabes "boycott"

Thank you for your commentary, Bill.
I wanted to know more on the different positions of the topic.

And excuse that my draft in English is not very good.

11:38 a.m. on August 1, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Barrabes "boycott"

for an extensive commentary and several side bars go to:
www.mtncommunity.org/

4:19 a.m. on January 15, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Barrabes

Quote:

What part of the article are you asking "if this is true"? Climbing Magazine and Rock&Ice have announced that they will no longer carry ads for the European dot-com climbing shops, Climbing in particular in an editorial in their issue a month or two back. And, yes, there was an article in the Wall Street Journal, as quoted in the link you gave. Climbing, and apparently now a couple of British climbing magazines, called for a "boycott" of the European dot-com shops (not just Barrabes), although more correctly, it was a call to "support your local climbing shop."

The reason ostensibly was that the Euro web shops are selling gear for far less than local shops, which potentially means that local shops will be unable to compete and could well go out of business. It seems that a lot of people go into the local mom&pop shop, ask lots of questions, try on the boots and clothing to get the right size, then head for their computer and order over the web. Some of these people are very open and even "in-your-face" about getting the info with no intention of buying anything from the local shop. Some are even reported to have bought from one of the Euro shops, then gone to a local shop to exchange for a different size or even demand a refund.

Another side is that there is indeed a large price differential, and given free markets, competition, and all that, why not buy where you get the best price? There have been claims made that the US importers and manufacturers of gear charge artificially inflated prices and have pressured the US stores, government, and magazines to promote the boycott in the interest of bigger profits.

I do not claim to know the true story of who does what to whom, but the Climbing magazine editorial was restricted to climbing gear, and said nothing about steel tariffs or boycotting any other goods. It only said that Climbing would not carry ads for the Euro dot-coms. I know people who have bought through the web, but these people also patronize (i.e., spend money at) their local shops. There is also the question of survival of local shops when a big chain (REI, EMS) moves in. In my area (SF Bay), we have 6 REIs, 2 Marmots, and 2 of a local shop Sunrise Mountaineering, and really not a lot more, well, ok, Any Mountain does carry a little bit of gear and a number of the climbing gyms have a corner that sells gear. We used to have a number of other small shops, plus shops that had a "climbing corner." But places like the Berkeley Ski Hut and Antelope are long gone.

I only scanned the article, but my impression is that it was mostly the usual contemporary version of "the news", that is, make it as controversial and sensational as possible, amplifying the screams of your local audience whose ox might be getting gored. There is truth there - several magazines writing editorials calling for their readers to buy from local shops rather than dot-coms and dropping ads from the dot-coms (not a big source of ad revenue, anyway, so no big loss in income for the mag). But climbing is still way too small a market to be of great concern to international trade and the balance of payments.

I must admit, I am one of those guys who used my local climbing store to make sure I wore the proper sized shoe for the manufacturer of each pair I considered buying through barrabes. In fact, when I first went looking for my next pair of rock shoes, I starting talking to the stores salesperson, started talking about local climbs and offered him a couple locations for good bouldering . He was pretty stoked that I shared this with him, within a couple of minutes, he slips me a paper with the site address and said to keep talk, hush hush while in the store and go get what I liked here for 1/2 price or less. Gear in my area is priced so outrageously, I know store rents are steep in this tourist town I live in, like everything else is, but when your jones'n for gettin' at a new route and you need the gear, but the bucks are low, now I see the way to go. Now I'm back in the game. I support the mom and pops stores when ever I can, but for big ticket items, I have to travel for sale or go online. If you can afford to help your neighboring stores, I can fully appreciate the money and effort you take to keep them alive. If you do choose to use their site, watch how much you spend and the weigh and how much you buy each year. If you ship too much at once or over a short time period, you might find a fat tarrif tax, penalties, delayed shipments, etc...... . It is all outline on the site, so for once, take the time and read that stuff. Peace

6:22 a.m. on April 19, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Barrabes

I agree with it all, i wrote an article on mountainjornal.net about the same thing.

When we get a far deal, we dont mind giving one

Cheers

December 18, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Soft Shell Pant for Mountaineering Newer: mountain hardware????
All forums: Older: Backpacks??? Newer: modifying rainfly