Yet another gear company sale

11:55 a.m. on September 22, 2004 (EDT)
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Some years back, Sunbeam bought Coleman. Coleman over the years has acquired other stove and camping gear companies, notably France's Camping Gaz and earlier, GB's Epigas. A couple years ago, Sunbeam had serious financial problems, reorganized as a private company, and renamed itself American Household Inc. This week, Jarden (maker of Diamond matches and Bicycle playing cards, among other things) acquired American Household.

Well, I guess ya gotta light your Bleuet with some kind of matches, and when sitting out storms at 17,000 on Denali, we did play games with Bicycle playing cards. But sometimes I wonder about how holding companies see some of their acquisitions as being related to each other.

3:45 p.m. on September 22, 2004 (EDT)
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Maybe they will bring back the gaz 106 fuel cannisters for the globetrotter series!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I know several interested parties.

7:03 p.m. on September 22, 2004 (EDT)
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Including ...

among others who post here regularly - Ed G, the Old GreyBearded One (OGBO is me, if you had forgotten), ......

There was an excited search across the country for the 100/106 canisters about a year ago on RCU/RBU. One of the folks in the PNW thought he had found a source, but it turned out to be Bleuet 206 and some SE Asian and Slovenian copies of the 206. One of our local camping shops also has a Primus version of the 206 cartridge.

I talked to the Coleman reps at the ORShow a couple years back about the lack of availability of the 106. At that time, they said there was no call for them to be imported to the US, although they were still available in Europe. Seems that very few Globetrotters were ever sold in the US, and I was the only person who had made a comment in a couple years (not that I really believed that). The reps seemed much less than enthused about the puncture cartridges in general, and hinted that Coleman would like to reduce the number of different fittings they currently have (something like 5 or 6, when you include the pure propane stoves) - "industry standard" threaded coupling for butane, PowerMax, non-threaded removable Gaz 270/470 coupling, puncture 200/206 Gaz, small propane bottle threaded (larger diameter than the butane version), large propane tank type, another butane cartridge that has a coupling that at first glance looks like the 270 Gaz coupling but is slightly smaller on a tiny canister that must not hold more than 50 grams of butane mix (only seen this at the ORShow and a couple of camping shops). There may be more.

9:38 a.m. on September 23, 2004 (EDT)
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Re: Including ...

It's a real shame as the globetrotter stove/cook kit/lantern combo was really a clever idea. I've tried the larger cannisters on the globetrotter and they seem to put out more pressure than the valve/burner assembly can handle. This is especially true of the lantern where the flames, even on it's lowest setting, shoot out of the top of the lantern when lit.

3:05 a.m. on April 7, 2005 (EDT)
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Re: Including ...

I have one of the old Globe Trotters too - just pulled it out of my old camping/scouting gear from when I was a kid - and have been searching high and low for some canisters. Your e-mail thread here is the first/only thing that I have been able to find in 3+ hours of searching that helps explain why there is no "hit" and everything for "Gaz Globe Trotter" references the 270 model. ANYWAY, have you been successful in finding any canisters/cartridges for the old model? Or is the old puncture model landfill fodder?

9:33 a.m. on April 7, 2005 (EDT)
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Re: Including ...

I may have found a source for some GT106 cartridges. A stove collecting mate of mine on the west coast found some in a store. He's going to pick some up for me over the weekend if there are any left. They are no longer made, neither here nor in Europe. I'll have to ask him the name of the store. Essentially the store just has some laying around, old inventory. When you see them, buy them as they are not likely to make any more.

Another stove collecting mate has been experimenting with changing out the valve on a globetrotter such that it takes modern cannisters. Last I heard it's about 85% done, but has a few bugs to work out.

11:11 a.m. on April 7, 2005 (EDT)
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Puncture Gaz canisters

As you found, the 100-series is no longer manufactured, according to the Coleman reps at the last OR Show. The 200-series is available from several companies, including the familiar blue Gaz (Coleman, the 206 version), a Primus one, and several Asian and Slovenian ones. These all appear to have the 206 mixture, going from the labels. REI carries the Gaz 206, and our local Redwood Trading Post carries the Gaz 206 and the Primus version. RTP has sometimes had one or more of the others, and a couple of the local military surplus stores also have them.

The big reason the puncture cartridge has become pretty much obsolete is that, once installed, you can not remove the cartridge until it is exhausted, unlike the Lindal, Gaz non-threaded (270 and 470), Coleman X-treme series, and a couple others. Another factor is that the puncture stoves slowly leak in storage, which means that if you have left the stove with the cartridge sitting for more than a few weeks between trips, it is likely to have little or no fuel. The rubber grommet that seals the stove to the cartridge hardens with time and stops sealing, where the rubber O-ring in the removable canisters is fairly new, so doesn't leak as much.

If you do make the mistake of removing the puncture cartridge before it is empty, you have a couple of significant safety problems. First is that if there is a source of spark or flame nearby, you get a spectacular blowtorch. Second is that the fuel expanding through the little puncture hole is chilled to an extremely low temperature (very much below 0F). If it touches your flesh, you get instant frostbite.

So the resealable cartridges are considered considerably safer. As for the weight, the little Globe Trotter was very light. But several of the tiny screwtop stoves (notably the Markill HotShot) are much lighter and much more compact than the Globe Trotter 100 top and just as hot if not more so. To keep the total weight down for a weekend trip, you can use the SnowPeak tiny cartridge (same 100 grams of fuel as the Gaz 100/106), although the cost per gram of fuel for Snowpeak canisters in general is much higher than anyone else's, and the smallest one is close to an order of magnitude more costly per gram than the largest canisters (convenience and light weight costs, as usual). You can end up with a similar weight and volume total with the HotShot top, the Snowpeak smallest canister, and the Snowpeak tiny titanium cookpot. This comes at a cost of over $100, but, hey, if you want light, you got as light as it gets.

11:43 a.m. on April 19, 2005 (EDT)
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Re: Puncture Gaz canisters

Thank you for the feedback. One comment - funny thing - I've had my globe trotter in storage with a canister on for probably close to 5 years (just picking back up with serious backpacking this year now that the kids are old enough) and there is still 2/3 can of fuel remaaining. Anyway, after much consideration, yes I simply broke down last week and bought 2 new (screw on) canister stoves (bought them vs. the white gas because they are typically more child/user friendly). For the cost and wieght, I really think they'll do a great job. I got the Northern Lights "Treker" and the second one was a self-igniting Northern Lights (I believe the "Packer"). Anyway, the Treker is the typical 3 oz. bare-minimum torch type stove and is compatible with the MSR canisters - sells for $19.99. The Packer wieghs more, has a windscreen rim and plastic packing container (like the Globetrotter did, unfortunately this one is plastic - good for bowls), but child friendly, compatible with the MSR canisters (although Northern Lights makes their own). It sells for $39.99. They both burn up to 10,000 BTU's and boil a liter in about 3 1/2 mins. Good deals for the purpose. Thank you for your information on the Gaz stuff, I guess it was time to trade it in/up ;-).

9:50 a.m. on April 21, 2005 (EDT)
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Re: Puncture Gaz canisters

My buddy on the west coast scored some GT106 cannisters. He will be mailing these to me soon. So, there are some out there (old stock), but buy them when you see them as they are not making any more.

11:46 a.m. on April 21, 2005 (EDT)
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Is it really a 106?

Are you sure it is the 106 (90 g of fuel) and not the 206 (190 g of fuel)? There have been reports here and on other websites of a store in Portland and others in the SoCal area that had the 106 cartridge, and even that REI had them. But these have all turned out to actually be the 206, either by Gaz (Coleman) or by one of several other companies. Primus, a company in Slovenia, and some SE Asian companies still produce the 206-type canister. A friend who lives in Portland was directed to the store there, called them, and got a strong reassurance and insistence that they indeed had the 106. When he got to the store, they only had the 206. The clerk insisted they were the same (obviously not, since the height of the 206 is about twice the 106, so it will not fit in the Globetrotter).

If it really turns out to be the 106, let us know where the store is and their name.

A caution by the way about "mailing" compressed gas canisters. In general, USPS, UPS, and FedEx (and other carriers) will not accept these from individuals. They will only accept flammables and other "dangerous" materials from licensed shippers. I am headed for a remote area and, since the airlines will not accept the canisters (or any fuel, or in most airline's cases, even stoves) in checked or carryon, I wanted to ship gear ahead. UPS and FedEx are happy to ship my stoves (sniff test required), but absolutely not fuel. USPS was not sure and is checking their regs.

1:21 p.m. on April 22, 2005 (EDT)
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Re: Is it really a 106?

The friend picking them up also has a globetrotter so I am fairly certain he's getting me the 106's. 206's are readily available in my area at REI and some local outfitters.

As far as shipping goes, the post office told me they could be mailed as long as you follow certain guidelines. The box needs to be packaged and labled a certain way and the box must be shipped via surface mail. I followed that up on the post office web site and that information agreed to what I had been told in person.

After they show up I'll let you know what I end up with.

Now I need some CV360 cartridges for my Rando 360. I've found them online, but a little spendy. I can't seem to find them locally.

9:34 a.m. on May 25, 2005 (EDT)
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Re: Is it really a 106?

The GT106 canisters arrived yesterday, however there were only 6 available. I don't know the store name, other than it was located in California. I think they just turn up some old inventory from time to time, but they do not have a steady supply. These canisters were old stock as they are labled made by Suunto which has to go back several years at least. The moral is, if you see some in a store, do not hesitate to throw them into your cart.

As far as mailing, the canisters were sent via USPS parcel post. There are mailing restrictions, but you can send these via parcel post as long as they are packaged well and labled properly. Really not a big deal. Shipping from California to Minnesota was $5.77. The firms that want to charge Haz Mat fees for shipping these are just lining their pockets.

3:20 p.m. on June 5, 2005 (EDT)
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I too have an old GT and was looking for some 106's. I have 1 but am disappointed I cant find any. A great little stove.

9:27 a.m. on August 22, 2005 (EDT)
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Re: Is it really a 106?

Hello!

I'm looking for the rubber seal around the puncture needle - can't find it anywhwere. Just want to tell you though - found about a hundred of the 106 canister from old stock at a local store. How interested are you in obtaining them?
I'm 100% sure about the sizes - used them myself a long time ago - you could stack 2 of the lower 106 instead of the 206. This way, you only lost half the gas in case of a leak...
So, let me know if you know about the seals - and if you want me to check if they can be sent over there at a reasonable cost.
Regards,
Hans Olofsson
Jokkmokk, Sweden

2:36 p.m. on September 1, 2005 (EDT)
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Re: Is it really a 106?

What would you charge for these, including shipping, to the USA?

3:20 a.m. on October 3, 2005 (EDT)
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Re: Is it really a 106?

Hi

I too am looking for some 106 canisters. I live in Italy, do you think you could post some to me here? What would they cost?
Thank you

12:14 a.m. on November 16, 2005 (EST)
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Rando 360/Gaz

Saw your post on Trailspace. Any luck locating camping gaz 360 cartidges or suitable replacement? I tried a similar Coleman resealable butane canister - - the cap fit, but the canister body was just slightly too wide to allow the stove to completely screw into place. Would like to know if you've found a source at a reasonable price.

Thanks,

Craig/Tucson

11:11 a.m. on November 17, 2005 (EST)
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Re: Rando 360/Gaz

Craig -

The CV360 is actually pretty widely available. There are several shops in the SFBay area that carry them, Redwood Trading Post for one. The ones with the Coleman name on them should actually fit (Camping Gaz is a subsidiary of Coleman), and I do know of people who have used them in place of the ones with the Gaz label. You might want to go to the Gaz website http://www.campingaz.com/, click on the "Where to find cartridges..." link (top of page, 4th choice), then "Contact us". It turns out that the section to enter your address to find a nearby dealer does not include North America, but mostly just Europe, Middle East, and Africa. They claim distribution in 120 countries, but the list of choices is much smaller than that. So you will need to use the "Contact us" to get a reply.

Not sure why you would want one of the units that take the CV360 canisters, though. The canisters are small and light, but the stoves are really too bulky for backpacking or climbing. The one place I see them used to any great extent is at trade shows ("come to our booth and get free crepes" for a couple at the OR Show), or hotels serving a fancy breakfast ("Full breakfast included with your room").

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