Drilling

9:24 a.m. on November 5, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

I have never bolted anything and I probably wont ever bolt anything in the mtns or the crags but Im looking to bolt a concrete pillar for aid practice. I was thinking of using a cordless drill with a 3/8 inch bit to do this. Will this work with regular drills and bits or do I have to get a special type of bit for drilling into concrete. I just dont want to spend money on a hand drill used for bolting that I will probably never use again if I can help it.

Thanks

Alex

12:13 p.m. on November 5, 2001 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
408 forum posts
Rotary Impact Hammer....

Quote:

I have never bolted anything and I probably wont ever bolt anything in the mtns or the crags but Im looking to bolt a concrete pillar for aid practice. I was thinking of using a cordless drill with a 3/8 inch bit to do this. Will this work with regular drills and bits or do I have to get a special type of bit for drilling into concrete. I just dont want to spend money on a hand drill used for bolting that I will probably never use again if I can help it.

If the concrete is robust at all, you won't be able to make much progress with a standard cordless drill. About any bit will do...(or won't do)...

What you really need is a rotary impact hammer. Best out thar seems to be the Hilti TE 6A then Bosch Annihilator. Some cheaper versions are Dewalt, etc.

Folks have used cordless drills to drill into really soft rock but for concrete...you might be better off hand drillin' with a Rokpecker or Rawl or anything you can borrow. Needs to whack spin whack spin rather than just spinnin' a drill.

Worth a try, but, I'm bettin' you won't have much luck. Can try in the garage though...easy enough...

Brian in SLC

2:20 p.m. on November 5, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Brandon, Brandon Lampley

Hey there,

You'll need carbide tipped masonry bits. Cordless may work, hammer drill if you have one. I've done 3/8 holes in hard concrete with a cordless non-hammer, it'll work, though it'll take a while and might burn up the motor.

The ultimate el cheapo solution is to just use the bits and a hammer, no of those fancy 50 - 100 dollar fish, hurricane handles. Wrap a bunch of duct tape at the top so you have something to hold and twist with, and whack away.

5:03 p.m. on November 5, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Someone mentioned a rotarty hammer, and they're right-that is definately the tool for the job . . . the drill bit needs to hammer the rock while it's spinning. Someone else mentioned that you can get by without the hammer action in the drill, and technically you can-until you hit a really hard spot in the concrete-and you probably will burn the drill up.

If you can get a cordless rotary hammer, that would be the easiest, but you might only drill three or four holes before both batteries get low. If you have more holes than that, and don't want to come back multiple times with fresh batteries, then try renting a bomber rotary hammer and a generator - which will cost you 50 bucks or more.

so, you might want to go the cheap route, . . . the duct tape wrapped drill bit, that you spin by hand as you hammer it.

in either case, get a couple of carbide tipped mason bits, or get a handful of regular mason bits. the regular ones are cheap, but they burn out quick - at times, i've burned through 5 bits drilling half a dozen holes into concrete foundations.

anyway, best bet is to borrow a cordless hammer drill from a buddy.

Quote:

I have never bolted anything and I probably wont ever bolt anything in the mtns or the crags but Im looking to bolt a concrete pillar for aid practice. I was thinking of using a cordless drill with a 3/8 inch bit to do this. Will this work with regular drills and bits or do I have to get a special type of bit for drilling into concrete. I just dont want to spend money on a hand drill used for bolting that I will probably never use again if I can help it.

Thanks

Alex

2:54 p.m. on November 7, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Karl

A roto-hammer is certainly best, but a regular drill will often work if the concrete isn't too old (like 20 yrs) and you don't hit too many hard rocks. The cordless drill will likely be brought to its knees if you have many holes, but if you've got the time it should work. Get a carbide tipped bit and start drilling. If progress slows or stops, remove the drill and take a center punch or concrete nail or nail set and pound it in the bottom of the hole with a hammer a few times. This often fractures the rock that is causing the slow down and allows the drilling to continue. Be sure and blow all powder out of the hole before placing the anchor.

Have fun.

Karl

Quote:

I have never bolted anything and I probably wont ever bolt anything in the mtns or the crags but Im looking to bolt a concrete pillar for aid practice. I was thinking of using a cordless drill with a 3/8 inch bit to do this. Will this work with regular drills and bits or do I have to get a special type of bit for drilling into concrete. I just dont want to spend money on a hand drill used for bolting that I will probably never use again if I can help it.

Thanks

Alex

9:10 p.m. on November 8, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Rotary Impact Hammer....Agree and

What Brian said, plus if it's for serious use get at least a 24V battery driven (+spare battery) hammer and an SDS head (any rotary hammer will have this anyway). HILTI, Bosch, Makita all good. Panasonic making some decent ones these days too. Cheap one won't last long...

Macca

9:03 p.m. on November 20, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Rotary Impact Hammer....Agree and

I guess I don't understand why you want to practice aid climbing a bolt ladder. There are plenty of those already around and you will climbing it your first time in 1/100 the time it took you to drill the route. Go out to a bolt ladder in the real world and save yourself the time, frustration and money. I have drilled a lot of bolts, but I also aid so I am speaking with plenty of experience. If you are still hell bent get the roto hammer and all the batteries that you can scrounge up.

9:03 p.m. on November 20, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Rotary Impact Hammer....Agree and

I guess I don't understand why you want to practice aid climbing a bolt ladder. There are plenty of those already around and you will climbing it your first time in 1/100 the time it took you to drill the route. Go out to a bolt ladder in the real world and save yourself the time, frustration and money. I have drilled a lot of bolts, but I also aid so I am speaking with plenty of experience. If you are still hell bent get the roto hammer and all the batteries that you can scrounge up.

9:22 a.m. on November 21, 2001 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Rotary Impact Hammer....Agree and

The four hour drive to the nearest bolt ladder is what motivates me to make one only 5 min from home. Surely you can appreciate the time saved and the practice gained with this idea. Anyways I ended up using Brandons idea, putting duct tape on a drill bit to act as a handle and hand drilling. Since I dont need to drill bolts all the time this seemed like the perfect solution. It worked nicely. Price: $15. Now I can go climb every day if I want and still be home for supper. Thanks to everyone for the advice.

 


Quote:

I guess I don't understand why you want to practice aid climbing a bolt ladder. There are plenty of those already around and you will climbing it your first time in 1/100 the time it took you to drill the route. Go out to a bolt ladder in the real world and save yourself the time, frustration and money. I have drilled a lot of bolts, but I also aid so I am speaking with plenty of experience. If you are still hell bent get the roto hammer and all the batteries that you can scrounge up.

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