Climbing Exercises

11:36 p.m. on August 29, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

I'm looking for a hanging board(is that the name?)or some type of apparatus consisting of holds that I can hang from and build individual finger and forearm strength. I'm not interested in building a wall--my wife would disown me. Any thoughts--I've read about them somewhere but can't find a thing on the web.

5:44 a.m. on August 30, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

www.blackholeclimbing.com/
www.ep-usa.com/mastergrip.asp

Just order one, and have fun!

8:38 a.m. on August 30, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Quote:

Just order one, and have fun!

They're not fun...This should read "Just order one, and have pain!" If you get one, though, ease into it. Hang boards are a good way to stress out your tendons and put you out of commission for awhile. I suggest posting a message here with the subject reading "Hang boards: good? bad? why?" There is also a product called 'Rock Rings' which come in pairs (one for each hand) and suspend from perlon or small rope so they can rotate with your natural bio-tendencies.

good luck.

8:50 a.m. on August 30, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

In lieu of actual climbing, bouldering is the best training.

If you don't even have boulders nearby, you might want to look into Horst's "Hit Strips."

Hang boards are VERY dangerous.

Pullups are probably the best gym erercise. I have hears some touting the benefite of reverse wrist cursl as well.

-Arms

8:26 p.m. on September 1, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Quote:

Quote:

Just order one, and have fun!

They're not fun...This should read "Just order one, and have pain!" If you get one, though, ease into it. Hang boards are a good way to stress out your tendons and put you out of commission for awhile. I suggest posting a message here with the subject reading "Hang boards: good? bad? why?" There is also a product called 'Rock Rings' which come in pairs (one for each hand) and suspend from perlon or small rope so they can rotate with your natural bio-tendencies.

good luck.

Thanks for the warning. Any idea where I can pick up a set of these "Rock Rings"?

8:30 p.m. on September 1, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Quote:

Thanks for the warning. Any idea where I can pick up these rock rings?

12:31 a.m. on September 3, 2001 (EDT)
3 reviewer rep
98 forum posts

Quote:

In lieu of actual climbing, bouldering is the best training.

If you don't even have boulders nearby, you might want to look into Horst's "Hit Strips."

Hang boards are VERY dangerous.

Pullups are probably the best gym erercise. I have hears some touting the benefite of reverse wrist cursl as well.

-Arms

1:44 a.m. on September 3, 2001 (EDT)
3 reviewer rep
98 forum posts
oops, sorry - pushed the wrong button

What I intended to say was that although Arms is right about the risks of hangboards, they DO provide a serious workout in very little space.

I've got the small nicros hangboard mounted over my kitchen door, and use it whenever the pressures of life (work, kids, etc.) make trips to the gym or the crags impossible. I've developed a regular workout routine, borrowing various ideas from here and there, that seems to enable me to maintain and even build fitness and finger and large muscle strength for climbing. And in two years of use so far (knock on wood) I haven't experienced any injuries.

I'm not a doctor, but from what I've read and heard, the basic risk with hangboards is potential repetitive use connective tissue injuries in your fingers, wrists, elbows and shoulders, as well as possible traumatic connective tissue injuries (blown pullies, etc.).

Apparently, one reason for this is the fact that muscle strength increases faster than connective tissue strength. So you start a workout program and the newly-developed power of your muscles enables you to work hard enough to injure your still-weak connective tissues. In addition, hangboards force you into pretty much the same movements every time, which increases the risk of repetitive use injuries.

My only trick to avoid this has been to increase my workload on the hangboard VERY gradually, allowing plenty of time for connective tissue strength to develop. Also, I stretch, warm up and hydrate thoroughly before workouts. So far, so good.

For a selection of hangboards, go to MountainGear at www.mgear.com, and do a search for "hangboards". They have my little Nicros and some others. Best one I've actually used is the Metolius Simulator, but it's quite a bit bigger than my Nicros.

Metolius Rock Rings are interesting too, (you can find them at MountainGear by searching "rock rings"). The fact that they're free hanging is supposed to improve the ergonomics of your workout, resulting in less injuries. I've only tried them in a store, but I found it very hard to hold on to the smaller features of the rock rings while they were moving - seemed like it might be tough to get a workout with them on anything except the principal bucket-type holds. Needless to say, YMMV.

Echoing what others have said, a serious hangboard workout is both boring and PAINFUL - you can give yourself a very serious burn indeed. But, for me at least, it works.

Just my two yen worth.

3:22 p.m. on September 3, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: oops, sorry - pushed the wrong button

Thanks for the info. I'll go real slow.

 

 

Quote:

What I intended to say was that although Arms is right about the risks of hangboards, they DO provide a serious workout in very little space.

I've got the small nicros hangboard mounted over my kitchen door, and use it whenever the pressures of life (work, kids, etc.) make trips to the gym or the crags impossible. I've developed a regular workout routine, borrowing various ideas from here and there, that seems to enable me to maintain and even build fitness and finger and large muscle strength for climbing. And in two years of use so far (knock on wood) I haven't experienced any injuries.

I'm not a doctor, but from what I've read and heard, the basic risk with hangboards is potential repetitive use connective tissue injuries in your fingers, wrists, elbows and shoulders, as well as possible traumatic connective tissue injuries (blown pullies, etc.).

Apparently, one reason for this is the fact that muscle strength increases faster than connective tissue strength. So you start a workout program and the newly-developed power of your muscles enables you to work hard enough to injure your still-weak connective tissues. In addition, hangboards force you into pretty much the same movements every time, which increases the risk of repetitive use injuries.

My only trick to avoid this has been to increase my workload on the hangboard VERY gradually, allowing plenty of time for connective tissue strength to develop. Also, I stretch, warm up and hydrate thoroughly before workouts. So far, so good.

For a selection of hangboards, go to MountainGear at www.mgear.com, and do a search for "hangboards". They have my little Nicros and some others. Best one I've actually used is the Metolius Simulator, but it's quite a bit bigger than my Nicros.

Metolius Rock Rings are interesting too, (you can find them at MountainGear by searching "rock rings"). The fact that they're free hanging is supposed to improve the ergonomics of your workout, resulting in less injuries. I've only tried them in a store, but I found it very hard to hold on to the smaller features of the rock rings while they were moving - seemed like it might be tough to get a workout with them on anything except the principal bucket-type holds. Needless to say, YMMV.

Echoing what others have said, a serious hangboard workout is both boring and PAINFUL - you can give yourself a very serious burn indeed. But, for me at least, it works.

Just my two yen worth.

September 30, 2014
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