guide service questions

1:38 p.m. on July 19, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. B Taylor

I'm trying to make plans for a trip next summer and I plan on doing it with the services of a guide. Since I've never used the services of a guide before, what sorts of questions should I be asking these companies as I call them up? Also, if there are any articles in the popular mags or online sources that discuss this sort of thing I'd appreciate it.
Thanks

3:26 p.m. on July 19, 2001 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
409 forum posts
Maybe something...

Quote:

I'm trying to make plans for a trip next summer and I plan on doing it with the services of a guide. Since I've never used the services of a guide before, what sorts of questions should I be asking these companies as I call them up? Also, if there are any articles in the popular mags or online sources that discuss this sort of thing I'd appreciate it.

Here's some ground rules for evaluating a guide service that I've stole from a canyoneering website:

-what are the company's guide training and certification requirements?

-what are the company's first aid and rescue and certification requirements?

-Does the guide service have insurance and all required permits?

-How long has the guide service been in operation and how many days has the guide accumulated?

-Does the guide have experience in diverse conditions and seasons?

-How familiar is the guide with the particular climbing terrain including various seasons and conditions?

-Has the guide service had any accidents and why?

-Will the guide or guide service provide references?

You can probably tell that the person who came up with this criteria has a vested interest in certification and permits. Be that as it may, you can still find some great folks out there who teach but don't follow all of the "rules". Best thing to do is ask around...like, you've done here! Reputation means a lot in this business. And...sometimes you don't get what you pay for, and sometimes you get way more than you pay for....

Brian in SLC

2:58 p.m. on July 24, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

AMGA/UIAGM

I suppose it depends on what you're planning to do. If you're just going to slog up some big peak, probably any well known, reputable, Forest Service licensed guide would do. If you're looking to learn and be trained, I'd go for an AMGA/UIAGM certified guide. If you look on their website (www.amga.com) at what they have to do just to get basic certification you realize they aren't like the rest of us mere mortals. Besides that, these are people who have clearly dedicated their lives to guiding and teaching climbing. If I were looking for someone that's where I'd go.

Btw, this is sure to reignite an age old argument. So just for the record, I'm not saying that you need to be a certified guide to be good... there are several people who post on this site that are recognized as top notch guides. I'm only saying that picking an AMGA guide is a sure way to get someone competent and committed.

6:31 p.m. on August 31, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Has a proffessional member of amga I'm here to tell you that you shouldn't beleive everything yu readContact me I'll let you know more

Quote:

I'm trying to make plans for a trip next summer and I plan on doing it with the services of a guide. Since I've never used the services of a guide before, what sorts of questions should I be asking these companies as I call them up? Also, if there are any articles in the popular mags or online sources that discuss this sort of thing I'd appreciate it.
Thanks

November 22, 2017
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