Harvard study links BPA levels to drinking from polycarbonate bottles

3:45 p.m. on June 17, 2009 (EDT)
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This thread is for comments on the article "Harvard study links BPA levels to drinking from polycarbonate bottles"

A new study from the Harvard School of Public Health is the first to directly show that drinking from polycarbonate bottles raises BPA levels in urine.

Full article at http://www.trailspace.com/blog/2009/06/17/bpa-polycarbonate-link-harvard-study.html

3:33 p.m. on June 18, 2009 (EDT)
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am i too assume that if a bottle is labeled BPA free, then even if it's a nalgene, it's ok?

3:49 p.m. on June 18, 2009 (EDT)
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Yes, well, presumably as safe as anything else out there.

It's important to note that Nalgene makes plastic and metal water bottles from a variety of materials, besides the polycarbonate ones they've since phased out (though you can still buy them at some stores).

http://www.nalgene-outdoor.com/technical/materials/index.html

Nalgene, and lots of other manufacturers, now use Tritan by Eastman for their hard plastic bottles. It's also a #7 for recycling, but #7 covers lots of different materials, not just polycarbonates w/BPA.

Made with Tritan from Eastman
Extremely durable
Resistant to staining
Resistant to retaining odors
Recommended for "extreme" adventures
Dishwasher Safe - Please make sure the cap does not touch the heating element
Withstands temperatures from -40ºF to 212ºF
This bottle is made from Eastman Tritan copolyester that is manufactured without Bisphenol A (BPA)
This bottle has a recycling code of #7, which means other. It does not contain BPA
Made in USA

12:05 p.m. on June 19, 2009 (EDT)
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Hmmm, that's interesting -

This bottle has a recycling code of #7, which means other.

"Other" could include any one of a few thousand chemicals.

1:40 p.m. on June 19, 2009 (EDT)
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Yes, #7 is a catchall for everything that doesn't fall into numbers 1-6, or that uses more than one type of plastic, including 1-6.

All plastics that do not already fall into categories 1 through 6 must be designated with the “other” marking, which is #7. These categories are required by law in 39 states on certain types of containers. #7 is often the container of choice for reusable plastic water and baby bottles. In addition, any container made from multi-layered or mixed materials – even when the layers are made from #1 through #6 materials – must also be marked with the #7 for “multi-layered materials.”

From: http://earth911.com/plastic/number-7-plastic/

Also, check out the following, for info on all numbers: http://www.thedailygreen.com/green-homes/latest/recycling-symbols-plastics-460321

August 21, 2014
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