Trekking Poles: Parts Explained (Part 2)

1:31 p.m. on May 26, 2010 (EDT)
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This thread is for comments on the article "Trekking Poles: Parts Explained (Part 2)"

Trekking poles have become more complicated than the single-piece hiking staffs they've replaced. Here's a primer on the parts of a trekking pole: from strap and grip down to basket and tip.

Full article at http://www.trailspace.com/articles/trekking-poles-parts-explained.html

9:58 p.m. on May 26, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Trekking Poles: Parts Explained

Handle, pole, thingy part that sicks in the ground?


I am not one to over-complicate things.......... but then it is tough for me to remember to wash my shorts.

11:56 a.m. on May 27, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Trekking Poles: Parts Explained

I like the idea of "The FLASK POLE" you can put a Martini in it and at the end of the day you can have a Martini shaken not stirred

4:51 p.m. on May 27, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Trekking Poles: Parts Explained

..it is tough for me to remember to wash my shorts.

As long as you reverse which side faces your skin daily, that's ok.
Ed

6:27 p.m. on May 27, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Trekking Poles: Parts Explained

noddlehead said:

..it is tough for me to remember to wash my shorts.

As long as you reverse which side faces your skin daily, that's ok.
Ed

:)........... Good to know!........ Now I just gotta remember which side I wore the day before??


Good article on the trekking poles and I use them on most any rough terrain with any grade.

I guess it is like most everything and we have our own personal preferences.

For me the lighter the better and I do not like using the straps.

I'm a former golfer and club builder. I was looking at a set of trekking poles I had purchased one evening and the light bulb came on.

Two extra stiff driver shafts, over sized club grips, commercial tips and some parts from a hardware store and I had made what fits me to a tee. (No pun intended.)

They cost a fraction of commercial trekking poles as well.

6:59 p.m. on May 27, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Trekking Poles: Parts Explained

I'm a former golfer and club builder. I was looking at a set of trekking poles I had purchased one evening and the light bulb came on.
Two extra stiff driver shafts, over sized club grips, commercial tips and some parts from a hardware store and I had made what fits me to a tee. (No pun intended.)

They cost a fraction of commercial trekking poles as well.

Cool! You should post a picture with some DIY info and show us.

8:39 p.m. on May 28, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Trekking Poles: Parts Explained

Thanks for the informative article.

I prefer cork grips, I have not tried the BD Flicklocks yet.

I like baskets & metal tips.

After reading about the LED lights and stuff I told my wife I was going to add some Shimano 600 center pull brakes to mine for steep terrain, she just shook her head and walked out of the room.

Waiting for part 2.

9:08 p.m. on May 28, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Trekking Poles: Parts Explained

After reading about the LED lights and stuff I told my wife I was going to add some Shimano 600 center pull brakes to mine for steep terrain, she just shook her head and walked out of the room.

ROFL!

Did you expect a different response from someone who is "normal"??

2:28 a.m. on June 17, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Trekking Poles: Parts Explained

Other than being adjustable, there is only one thing that differentiates a trek pole from a stick. It is the strap ('wrist strap'). Rather than a cool decoration or a means to keep it attached to your body, or a complete bother, the strap's major purpose is to transfer the weight placed on the pole from a large bone connected to the rest of the skeleton. The muscles controlling the hand and fingers are relatively small and fatigue easily. Putting downward pressure on a properly fitted wrist strap transfers a lot of energy from the body's larger upper muscles (back, shoulders, upper arms) to the wrist bone instead of the hand. The hand and fingers don't need a death grip on the trek but are mainly used to flick the trek forward and make sure it gets planted correctly. (This also means you don't need expensive feather weight treks.) Then the power stoke takes over putting the energy transfer to the wrist bone. (There goes the expensive shock absorber.) If you simply take the weight of your arms off your feet, over the day's hike, you can save substantially on what is normally being moved along by your lower body.

Once you get good at it, and well coordinated (as well as a fit upper body), you can press down with just 20 pounds on each stride (left and right step) for a fairly long distance. This is maybe over twice the weight of a big arm. Over the length of a mile you will transfer 40,000 pounds to the poles instead of your legs and feet. This assumes you have something near a left to left foot pace of about five and a quarter feet. This gives you about 2000 strides a mile (times 20 pounds each stride).

If you only have one trek, you are mostly carrying it instead of taking advantage of all the walking efficiency a pair was designed for.

While getting prepared for that hike in the future, along with jogging and running stairs, you had best be getting that upper body buffed out as well...if you are planning to use trek poles.

If you have ice on your mittens or gloves it is almost impossible to adjust twist locks with out exposing your hands to some really, really cold metal. And don't take the dare to touch your tongue to it either.

For the measuring geeks, the Roman Pace is left to left (or right to right) foot. A mille passuum ( "a thousand paces") is perhaps the linguistic root of our mile and became the distance between those milestones on the Roman roads. They had shorter legs apparently as their mile is less than all of the other UK (English, Scot, Irish, or statute) miles.

On a related mater, if you count the number of Roman Paces you make in 36 seconds and divide by 10, it will give you a rough approximation of how fast you are walking (in mph). Works best on level, well groomed land. Again, it assumes your pace is close to 1000th of a mile (5.28'). If not, adjust the arithmetic to make it work. The derivation of the algorithm is left to the reader. (HINT: 60 minutes times 60 seconds is....). Extra credit if you figure the metric equivalent in KPH.

HEY! A new iPhon ap.

August 27, 2014
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