limmer boot resole

5:43 p.m. on November 5, 2013 (EST)
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sent my limmer standard boots back to the company for re-soling - i re-sole normal shoes all the time here but don't trust the regular cobbler with these boots.  they are 7 years old, and the vibram lug sole was wearing close to the midsole.  for those who aren't familiar, these are full-leather boots with heavy-duty leather, 3.2mm, a full leather lining, with a very thick and stiff midsole and a thick vibram lug sole.  old school boots.  appears the people who make their custom boots do the re-soling work.  was told it might entail replacing the mid-sole too, depending on what they see (the midsole is very hard rubber, but i don't know if seven years of walking, hiking, bad weather might affect that part of the boot).  the estimated cost is fairly reasonable, and the turnaround time is said to be 8-10 weeks. 

i don't know if they work on non-limmer boots - tend to doubt it.   

10:04 p.m. on November 5, 2013 (EST)
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limmers are a good investment. those boots will last thru several resoles. If I was doing a lot of long haul backpacking, I would get me some.

6:32 p.m. on November 6, 2013 (EST)
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last year i walked into limmers' with a pair of barely salvageable chacos.

3/4 hr. & twenty-five beans later, i smiled.

they weren't perfect, but they cut the mustard enough to get me by until summers' end.

"i don't know if they work on non-limmer boots - tend to doubt it." 

perhaps i got lucky?

hope this helps.

11:10 a.m. on November 8, 2013 (EST)
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helpful info, 522.  clearly, they will do other repairs.  makes me miss NH (i'm from there originally). 

i had a pair of chacos re-strapped a while ago.  though chaco moved manufacturing overseas, they still do the repairs and custom work in Colorado.  google 'rechaco' for more info.

an advantage of chaco repairs is that they will do them piecemeal if you want. when i restrapped the shoes and replaced the plastic hardware, they were able to retain the diamond stealth sole, a very sticky rubber that chaco no longer uses. 

6:57 p.m. on November 8, 2013 (EST)
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Andrew, what part of NH?

are you still eastern-based?

yes, I have used re-chaco, but in the essence of time, I gave it my best shot.

keep it real!

522

 

8:32 a.m. on November 9, 2013 (EST)
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Born and lived on Manchester when I was little, Portsmouth when I returned (married) and worked for a few years. We live outside dc now. I try to get to the white mountains once or twice a year to hike.

11:57 a.m. on January 30, 2014 (EST)
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the boots are back.  Brand new sole, new mid-sole, stitching is clean and uniform.  and they still fit like a glove.  85 bucks plus shipping, which ends up being about what i pay to re-sole and re-heel a pair of my dress shoes for work. 
limmer-1.jpg


limmer-2.jpg

12:07 p.m. on January 30, 2014 (EST)
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Good old Limmers.  Cough Cough.  Had my Lightweight Limmers resoled back in 2002 for about $99.  Long story but it wasn't my fault---the waxed welt thread on the new ones got "cut" by hiking and I called the company and they told me they had a batch of Lightweights made "accidentally" using unwaxed thread which my boot mvt caused to cut and so the soles came nearly off.

Sent them in for work of course.  A month after I got them back?  See pic---


LIMMER-BOOTS-010.jpg

I ran to Asolo like a bonobo monkey running away from a syphilis-drenched banana.

1:50 p.m. on January 30, 2014 (EST)
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i will dutifully note if my newly-resoled limmer standards delaminate like that.  i can tell you that for the first 6 years, the boots have been fabulous.  i had them resoled because the part of the sole near the toe had worn to the point that it would have soon affected the midsole - and the heels were worn asymmetrically, as usual. 

i bought a pair of limmer lightweights a year after the standards, in 2008. different sole configuration, and i use them differently.  they don't yet need to be resoled.  once again, no seam failure, no delamination. 

Asolo makes a great boot.  a shame they discontinued the Yukon years ago. 

5:12 p.m. on January 30, 2014 (EST)
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I hear the Limmer Standards are way beyond the Lightweights in quality though your experience says otherwise as your lightweights are working out well.

6:42 p.m. on January 30, 2014 (EST)
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I don't want to mail order boots, but if I ever get close to the Limmer shop I am going to pick up a pair.

5:43 p.m. on January 31, 2014 (EST)
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the mail order process with limmer is a little more involved than you might think.  they ask you to put on the socks you would wear with sturdy boots, do a tracing of your foot on a piece of paper, then measure the circumference of your foot at several different points.  their advice about sizing, using that data, was spot-on.  more so, they use different lasts for certain boots and knew, off the top of their head, that my foot wasn't a good match for the last they use for their mid-weight boot.  you are right, though, that it's hard to substitute for trying a pair on. 

+++++++++

the spot where your limmer lightweights delaminated is probably a tricky place to apply cement - because you're gluing the midsole to an EVA-type material, whereas the standard uses a one-piece vibram lug sole.

i think the people at limmer see a wide range of wear.  i had a few friends destroy their limmers when they worked on AMC trail crews.  they inflict an unbelievable amount of damage on their boots.  they spend the better part of a season out in the field, doing trail construction.  boots that get wet and dirty never have a chance to dry out or get cleaned, they are basically being used like boots on a construction site, and a season or two of that can annihilate even the best and sturdiest boot.  i had a short discussion about whether to use a thicker-than-normal midsole when they were getting ready to re-sole my boots, they looked at my boots (which i thought i wear quite a bit), and they characterized the wear as "light."   you appear to put your boots through more than I do, so who knows.  apparently, i'm a trail wimp.  :)

even the best companies run into problems with manufacturing on occasion.  chaco stopped selling water shoes with the sticky, floor-blackening non-slip sole for a while because some batches of glue produced more than normal delamination, and they apparently had to reformulate the cement.  Boots inadvertently made with a batch of unwaxed thread fall into that category too.  like buying a car that's a lemon.  highly annoying. 

September 14, 2014
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