Removing peeling waterproofing from old tents & packs

12:37 a.m. on September 25, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
105 forum posts

Anyone know of a quick & easy way to remove peeling waterproofing coatings from tent floors? I attempted it once with an internal frame pack using hot water to soften & then remove the coating from the fabric, but it was very labor intensive and time consuming. Any solvents, chemicals, etc. one could use to remove the coating without damaging the fabric or stitching? Any suggestions would be appreciated!

9:07 a.m. on September 25, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,083 forum posts

Hi John, You may wish to post this on backpacking.net as well as here. They have a make your own gear forum and there may be someone who has done this.

Anybody have any experience on retreating areas, in my case a tent floor, where the coating is gone? If so, what are the results and what product did you use?

Alan

10:25 a.m. on September 25, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
105 forum posts

Thanks for the heads up on putting it on the other forum. Maybe we'll both get some answers!

10:28 a.m. on September 26, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,083 forum posts

Pass on what you find out. I just picked up a vintage Kelty (sun valley lable) carrying tote that needs to have the coating stipped off and new stuff applied. Got to love the days when they used leather on gear.

3:00 p.m. on September 26, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
181 forum posts

If you're talking about the film of plastic like on the inside of older tents, I'd like to know about that also.

Please, please post the results, and also, how you might re-waterproof something of this type.

Thanks

Steve

12:28 a.m. on September 28, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
105 forum posts

Got two suggestions from Backpacking Forum--one said to use Tide and a soft scrub brush, the other said that Tide & hot water in a tumbler commercial washer would work. Concern I hace with the latter is the stress on the fabric & stitching. May try the Tide & brush using hot water.

9:08 p.m. on September 28, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
181 forum posts

So you use Tide to remove the old. What do you do next to replace the old? Mine looks like very thin plastic peeling off in a sheet. Is this the same thing everyone in the thread is speaking of? This is on my 40 year old Eureka backpacking tent, and I don't even know what they used back then. If someone has a link to a Eureka support site, I could use that also, but so far I haven't found it on their site.

Thanks

Steve

11:12 p.m. on September 28, 2006 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
166 forum posts

I've been wondering about this too. A few years ago , someone told me to use SnoSeal. I never tried it. I thought SnoSeal was for leather. Not nylon.

10:31 a.m. on September 29, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
181 forum posts

Somehow, I missed the way to find support on the Eureka site the first time around, but emailed them this morning about repair.

The reply said to call the warranty/replacement department. I'll give that a try, but don't have a lot of confidence in getting any answers. I'll post whatever they tell me.

Steve

1:13 p.m. on September 29, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,083 forum posts

I've had good email information from Eureka in the past on various issues. Hopefully they come through here.

Sno Seal would leave wax on anything it touches. I think some sort of fabric treatment would at least make the fabric water repellent, but I would not use sno seal.

7:29 p.m. on September 29, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
181 forum posts

I finally got through this afternoon to the Eureka department for this type of stuff. They immediately told me they recommend PolySeal for re-treating. The PolySeal web site indicates that Eureka uses this now, so at least the stories match up.

The PolySeal web site indicates that some color change will occur and that it is to be applied on the outside, not inside where the peeling is occuring. So I emailed them to get an estimate of coverage per gallon and their recommendations for this type of repair.

I'll update when I hear from them.

Steve

11:45 a.m. on September 30, 2006 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
166 forum posts

Steve,

What is the web site address for Poly Seal?

1:02 p.m. on September 30, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
181 forum posts

Oops,

That is supposed to be PolyCoat, not PolySeal. They also make AquaSeal. Told you I was getting old. They make all sorts of waterproofing stuff. And there's a local dealer here in WV!

The web site is http://www.aquaseal.com/

Sorry for the misinformation,

Steve

12:25 p.m. on October 3, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
181 forum posts

The AquaSeal people say that an 8 oz. bottle of Poly Coat will cover 25 square feet of nylon. In most cases, they recommend 2 coats for all but the very-seldom used parts of the tent. So a floor and partial wall covering should get two coats, along with any rain fly.

Gallons may be special ordered.

Second coats should be applied before the first has dried, usually about 15-20 minutes after the first, and both should set for 72 hours before using/packing.

Talcum powder should be used once after the 72 hours to avoid any sticking of coated faces.

Steve

7:31 p.m. on October 3, 2006 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
166 forum posts

This is done on the outside of the tent-correct?

4:43 a.m. on October 4, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
181 forum posts

The new sealer is applied on whatever side the original coating was NOT. In the case of floors, where there may have been waterproofing on both sides originally, you should try and remove as much as possible of the original and apply to both sides.

Since the PolyCoat is absorbed by the nylon, it may bead up if there is residual original waterproofing. It's the same reason a second coat should be applied within the 15-20 minutes of the original.

5:55 p.m. on October 4, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
105 forum posts

Blackbeard, thanks for the info!

10:41 a.m. on October 10, 2006 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,083 forum posts

Over the weekend I experimented with removing old waterproofing. I had a tent fly where the waterproof coating was intact, but stuck to itself like glue. I soaked the fly in a mixture of parson's amonia cleaner and hot water. In no time at all the coating was gone. Quite amazing actually. I then hosed the fly down and basically all of the coating is long gone. I don't have time now, but in the spring I am going to attempt to recoat the fly. I have other tents that may need this treatment as well.

December 17, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Instructions needed for old Morsan tent Newer: Problem with my Svea 123
All forums: Older: Eureka! Freedom Tent Recipient of da Vinci Award Newer: WANTED: Patagonia Half Mass Bag (Original, Old style)