Adding a hydration port to an older backpack

11:40 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Nowadays just about every pack comes with built-in hydration sleeve and various ports for the drinking tubes.

But how difficult, or simple, would it be to add a couple of ports to an older pack?   I'm not talking about simply cutting holes in the fabric.  I'm talking about the real deal - ports which would maintain the bag's integrity and weatherproofness.

Is that something that a local sewing shop could tackle for a small fee?

Thanks!

KD

1:24 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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I would imagine many outdoor sewing shops get that request a lot now-a-days. Re-enforced stitching around the "hole's" would make the pack keep its normal shape, so as not to tear out with stress.

On my top loading pack that is pre-hydration vented I just slip the mouth tube out past the cinched close-up area on top. You can get extensions for the tube if nessessary.

 

2:27 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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I had and older marmot day pack that didn't have a drinking tube port, so I stiched around the spot I wanted to place it, and then used a heated razor blade to melt/cut the opening. The Fabric is synthetic, so using the heated blade melts the cut and will not fray. The stitching just reinforced and maintains the fabric strength.

I am sure you could easily find a tailor who would do a nice job, and even sew in overlapping port flaps to mitigate rain or debri getting in.

9:25 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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GaryPalmer said:

On my top loading pack that is pre-hydration vented I just slip the mouth tube out past the cinched close-up area on top. You can get extensions for the tube if nessessary.

 

x2   ... what he said.

____________________________

                      ~r2~

11:16 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Heat a big round nail or stake with a blow or propane torch.  Push said nail or stake thru the the pack material.  Stitch a patch around the hole (one or both sides if you you feel it is necessary).  If you add the patch(es) before you put your hot nail/stake thru the pack  you will then only have to make one pass thru the pack rather than doing the pack and patch(es) separately.

5:50 a.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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apeman said:

Heat a big round nail or stake with a blow or propane torch.  Push said nail or stake thru the the pack material.  Stitch a patch around the hole (one or both sides if you you feel it is necessary).  If you add the patch(es) before you put your hot nail/stake thru the pack  you will then only have to make one pass thru the pack rather than doing the pack and patch(es) separately.

 Clever ....

1:24 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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September 20, 2014
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