Hilleberg Tents

10:43 a.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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I recently purchased a Hilleberg Soulo about two weeks ago.  I had the tent about a week before I noticed a tiny blemish on the inner tent.  The blemish was near the apex of the inner tent, approx 1 to 2mm long.  I had bought this directly from the Hilleberg website (Redmond, WA location).  I emailed them upon discovering it and approximately a day later, I received an email from Petra Hilleberg herself requesting photos of the tear.  I took a couple of photos and sent it. The tear does not go all the way through the fabric, but, looks more like a separation of the fibers.

tear-pic-1.jpg
tear-pic-3.jpg

Within an hour or two she emailed me again saying it was most likely due to something occurring during the manufacture of the tent possibly a snag, taking full responsibility for it and never questioning if I had done something to cause it.  She said they could remedy it by sending me Seam Grip to make the repair and as compensation, they would send tent pegs, a pole holder kit for the inner tent, or some similar accessory.  Or they would take the tent back entirely.  Of course, I saw no reason to send it back and opted for the Seam Grip and a set of the Hilleberg Sand and Snow pegs.  Those pegs are $70 for six.  Received another email the next day stating they would be shipping it as well as a reminder from Petra saying to use the Seam Grip on the inner tent and tent floor only, because the fly is sylnylon.  I am very impressed by the way Hilleberg handled this small imperfection in my tent and I believe they would handle a bigger issue in the same manner as long as the tent was not "misused" in some way.

I have used the tent in the White Mountains Wilderness about 4 days ago during an overnight and it was great.  The conditions were dry and cold.  It got down into the twenties at night and I had a small thermometer with me.  Inside the inner tent, it stayed around 40 deg F the entire night.  I left the outer fly vent open and the inner was completely zipped.  No condensation problems.  The winds were gusty up to about 25mph and I had used six of the 12 guylines.  The tent was quiet throughout the windy night. 

WM-Wilderness.jpg
WM-Wilderness-2.jpg

I am very pleased with the decision to purchase the tent and recommend Hilleberg to anyone seriously considering a stout but lightweight, 4 season tent.

10:58 a.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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The Soulo is a Kerlon 1200 tent which means it uses even a thinner denier fabric (30) for the inner tent than the Kerlon 1800's.  See:

http://hilleberg.se/sv/node/112

Most of my Hillebergs are Kerlon 1800 but I have found with even the higher denier of 40 that I commonly get small holes in the yellow canopy.  It's tissue-like stuff but works okay.  It looks like you definitely got a manufacturing defect and were treated well.

11:21 a.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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Hey Tipi, the floor on my BA Copper Spur is 30 denier lol. 

12:22 p.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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30 for a floor! The floor on the 1800's are 100 denier and 70 denier on the 1200 models.

5:58 p.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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rob5073 said:

30 for a floor! The floor on the 1800's are 100 denier and 70 denier on the 1200 models.

 You've got that right.  This fact alone makes the Hilleberg line so outstanding.  I sat countless times in a Hilleberg with the 100 denier floor in a deluge rainstorm and saw the campsite get a 1/2 inch to an inch of water and it looked like a waterbed inside the tent but not a single drop of water came in.

6:13 p.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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Yeah, well my FLy Creek has a floor of 20D. And three holes which I discovered at 4AM on the Bob. Bad way to find holes (water pooling inside).

8:45 p.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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rob5073 said:

I recently purchased a Hilleberg Soulo about two weeks ago.  I had the tent about a week before I noticed a tiny blemish on the inner tent.  The blemish was near the apex of the inner tent, approx 1 to 2mm long.  I had bought this directly from the Hilleberg website (Redmond, WA location).  I emailed them upon discovering it and approximately a day later, I received an email from Petra Hilleberg herself requesting photos of the tear.  I took a couple of photos and sent it. The tear does not go all the way through the fabric, but, looks more like a separation of the fibers.

tear-pic-1.jpg
tear-pic-3.jpg

Within an hour or two she emailed me again saying it was most likely due to something occurring during the manufacture of the tent possibly a snag, taking full responsibility for it and never questioning if I had done something to cause it.  She said they could remedy it by sending me Seam Grip to make the repair and as compensation, they would send tent pegs, a pole holder kit for the inner tent, or some similar accessory.  Or they would take the tent back entirely.  Of course, I saw no reason to send it back and opted for the Seam Grip and a set of the Hilleberg Sand and Snow pegs.  Those pegs are $70 for six.  Received another email the next day stating they would be shipping it as well as a reminder from Petra saying to use the Seam Grip on the inner tent and tent floor only, because the fly is sylnylon.  I am very impressed by the way Hilleberg handled this small imperfection in my tent and I believe they would handle a bigger issue in the same manner as long as the tent was not "misused" in some way.

I have used the tent in the White Mountains Wilderness about 4 days ago during an overnight and it was great.  The conditions were dry and cold.  It got down into the twenties at night and I had a small thermometer with me.  Inside the inner tent, it stayed around 40 deg F the entire night.  I left the outer fly vent open and the inner was completely zipped.  No condensation problems.  The winds were gusty up to about 25mph and I had used six of the 12 guylines.  The tent was quiet throughout the windy night. 

WM-Wilderness.jpg
WM-Wilderness-2.jpg

I am very pleased with the decision to purchase the tent and recommend Hilleberg to anyone seriously considering a stout but lightweight, 4 season tent.

I'm glade to see that Hilleberg not only honured their warranty but inb fact did not even ask if it was anything you might have done.  They are a quality company making quality gear with quality warranty/customer service.  Yea can't beat that if you decide that a Hilleberg is for you.  I still have them in my sights.

"So many tents...........so little time"

9:46 p.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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Wow, interesting timing.  I was just recently reading about the Hilleberg Soulo.

This summer I finally got my act in gear & went backpacking a number of times ... more backpacking then I had done in the past 30 years combined.  But as much as I like my Copper Spur UL 1 in the summer, or even cool weather - like in the 30's & breezy on a couple trips in October, the mostly-mesh body isn't what I want for anything more wintery.  Plus, I must admit, I've been mostly a fair-weather backpacker.  I talked up a storm about doing more last winter (no pun intended, hehe) but it just didn't happen.

But I'm on a roll now with this summer's trips behind me, and a strong desire to keep getting "out there", and I'd like to push my limits and get out more in the winter.

(now getting back to the OP's topic) I have been reading about the Hilleberg Soulo, as it seems to be one of the most recommended solo 4-season tents.  Unfortunately the $600+ for tent + footprint... + another $70 for snow pegs ...  has held me at bay, but it's great to see that they have customer service that lives up to the premium price tag.

9:46 p.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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Patman said:

Yeah, well my FLy Creek has a floor of 20D. And three holes which I discovered at 4AM on the Bob. Bad way to find holes (water pooling inside).

 Patman, do you use a footprint of some sort with your Fly Creek?

12:00 a.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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I like ready these posts when a company comes through with really good warranty and company/customer preservation service

7:17 a.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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bheiser1- In my opinion the money spent on Hilles is well spent. There are also a couple ways to save some money. 1) Look used, I got my Unna used from a guy is Pittsburgh and it looked like it had never been touched. These tents are overkill for %90 of the people that own them (myself included probably) and won't even have a mark on them from many uses. 2) You won't need a footprint. The floor strength is so far and away better then other tent makers. Sure it will prolong its life but it can be bought later on. I've used mine too many times to remember without a footprint with no problem. 3) You won't need the snow/sand pegs either. The standard supplied pegs aren't world class but they work. Especially if you are just starting winter camping, and I assume shorter 1,2 night trips, they'll will work fine. Long story short- do it.

8:14 a.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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bheiser1,

  Yes I have a real footprint now because of the tearing. I started out with just a 1.5 mil plastic but that clearly wasn't enough. The tent otherwise is a good product (I cast a dubious eye upon it now but honestly it's been through many other storms with no issue). But 20D is just not enough material for a floor. The problem now is my perception of delicacy. Now, I'm always worried about tearing it further which isn't a fun thing to worry about when out and about.

I just chalk it up to lesson learned about buying something off the internet without seeing it in person and touching it etc.... I admit that I was beguiled a bit by its light weight and favorable press. Now that I've added a proper footprint, it's weight is back in the range of other "light" three season tents....

9:10 a.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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Hey Patman, what did you settle on for the footprint? I've been using off-brand construction house wrap cut to size. It works fairly well, but i is essentially really thin conventional tarp material, which doesn't last very long. I am hoping to buy a roll of Tyvek sometime, which is the best combination of light weight, toughness, and durability that I have found. 

9:51 a.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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Gonzan,

  I have the actual Fly Creek Footprint now. I was going to make a Tyvek one myself but due to impatience I bought the manufactures model at River Sports for whatever was the next trip (needed it quickly). It’s still only 30D silNylon but so far seems to be working well. So maybe I effectively have a 50D floor now? Still too thin really...I’m committed to maximizing my investment but when I'm financially able I will absolutely be purchasing something beefier; while I probably won’t be living out of my tent for multiple weeks or anything, peace of mind does have a value to me.

10:07 a.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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Here's what I use---

http://www.lifeviewoutdoors.com/hiking-and-camping-gear/tents-tarps-and-accessories/shelters-and-tarps/equinox-egret-nylon-tarps.html

I have the 8x10 which I cut out the grommets and sewed together to form a 4x5 double layer which I place inside my tent mainly as a protection for my inflatable sleeping pad.  By being inside it also keeps any errant leaks between the tent floor and the tarp.

And in the morning when I pack up the pad I roll it in the tarp and place the whole wad in a dedicated long stuff sack which is strapped on the outside of the pack.  With five or six layers there's no way a sharp thorn or briar or hawthorn needle will get through.

And with all the steel grommets cut out it loses a few ounces.

12:16 p.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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Living out of one of these small mountain or backpacking tents takes some pre-planning and specialized equipment; a tarp pitched over one entry, a footprint of reasonably durable material and an EVA foam pad(s) under the  tent floor, but, over the footprint will make even a superb tent such as my Hilleberg "Saivo" far more livable for the "longterm". I have lived in these kind of tents for 4-6 weeks at a stretch and soon learned how to make my "home" more comfortable.

I like to use the cylindrical candle lanterns inside for light and a little warmth, use as much insulation under my sleeping bag as possible and add extra guylines for major nighttime wind and snow storms. I am considering buying a little propane tent heater for this and perhaps a light CO monitor.

I am not a "young'un", anymore and I notice the cold and damp more than I used to!

12:57 p.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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Dewey said:

 I am considering buying a little propane tent heater for this and perhaps a light CO monitor.

 This was the exact system I used in my Cabelas 12x12 Xtreme weather dome tent---a Mister Buddy propane heater with an outside propane tank, as below---


ChickasawCreekCamp.jpg


Mr.%20Buddy%20Heater.jpg

This is the same heater I used---and the little tank can easily be replaced with a long hose running outside the tent.  It is made for in-tent usage although I'm sure Trailspacers will have some pointers about the subject---it does have a shut-off switch for carbon monoxide, or something similar.

If a person really wants to set up a basecamp, and feels like making several trips on foot with different loads to the same spot, the above tent is one good option as the whole kit weighs in at around 70 lbs---doable in a couple trips including the propane and heater.  Lighter than a wall tent unless it's small and you cut your own frame poles at the site.




12:22 a.m. on November 9, 2011 (EST)
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@Patman, I was wondering, because I know I wouldn't want to use my Copper Spur without a footprint.  I've been using a plastic sheet, and so far so good... it's just a pain in windy weather...

12:25 a.m. on November 9, 2011 (EST)
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@Jake W - those are interesting ideas.  I agree, at least for me, the Soulo (or probably any Hilleberg) would be real overkill.  Actually I have a Mountain Hardwear tent (that just needs replacement zippers) that works OK in the kind of winter weather I'm likely to experience.  But the thing is it weighs ~8lbs - I'm through trying to lug that around backpacking.

The OP's story about the no-questions-asked support is inspirational ... so rare these days...

3:38 a.m. on November 22, 2011 (EST)
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After much debate about bivies, ID tents, and a whole slew of other shelters(4 season) I pulled the trigger on the Soulo w/footprint the other night. Bought the green one because I typically like to blend in.

I figured this would cover me as far as my solo treks go being I also have the Copper Spur 1.

Yes $600 for a solo shelter is a kick in the teeth but after alot of thought, feedback from others here, and my experiences that I had with my Akto(got swiped) I figured this was the option that offered everything I was looking for with the best livability.

I have snow stakes but in a pinch 3 section trekking poles can be broke down into 6 sections and the guylines can be ran off these with a deadman set. Or I can cut some sections of wood do the same thing and burn them at the end of my trip/or leave them at a shelter site for the next person to use as kinling.

7:11 a.m. on November 22, 2011 (EST)
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I have never seen a better, or,, even really equal one person shelter that WILL handle any conditions I have experienced in northern and western Canada and sets up so easily. ID tents are superb, BUT, for more specialized uses and setting one up in a driving rain with 60mph. gusts, as outside my study window now at 04:00 is a real PITA and the Hille. Soulo is much more "user friendly" in this regard.

I honestly do not think that any maker's tents are equal to Hilleberg's and this purchase should work well for you for 10-20 years to come with reasonable care. Lotsa bux, yup, but, all BS aside, you get exactly what you pay for in contemporary gear and Hilles are worth what they cost.

I hope to spend some nights in mine this coming January as my wife is rapidly improving from her spinal surgery of last month and I should be able to start getting out on snowshoes for 3-5 day solo treks again......so my "head" no end of good!

12:53 a.m. on November 23, 2011 (EST)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

After much debate about bivies, ID tents, and a whole slew of other shelters(4 season) I pulled the trigger on the Soulo w/footprint the other night. Bought the green one because I typically like to blend in.

I figured this would cover me as far as my solo treks go being I also have the Copper Spur 1.

Yes $600 for a solo shelter is a kick in the teeth but after alot of thought, feedback from others here, and my experiences that I had with my Akto(got swiped) I figured this was the option that offered everything I was looking for with the best livability.

I have snow stakes but in a pinch 3 section trekking poles can be broke down into 6 sections and the guylines can be ran off these with a deadman set. Or I can cut some sections of wood do the same thing and burn them at the end of my trip/or leave them at a shelter site for the next person to use as kinling.

 

Wow, congrats Rick.  I'm, ummm, green with envy :).  I've been contemplating the same, since as you know, the Copper Spur isn't suitable for cold/windy/windblown-dust/windblown-snow conditions.  It's either buy a winter tent or stay closer to the coast til summer (I haven't used the 'Spur in rain, so I don't know yet how it is in wind driven rain...).

So you had an Atko & it got stolen?

11:04 p.m. on November 26, 2011 (EST)
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Yeah I got nailed while my vehicle was parked. They cleaned me out. Pack, boots, tent, and a whole slew of other stuff. 

I am still recovering from that one. It was my 4wd and I only carry liability on it(its paid off) so it was an out of pocket loss. I had stickers on the back(Scarpa, Osprey, MSR, etc) so this may have made my vehicle a target. No more stickers for me.

The Akto was a sweet little tent but I am a fan of freestanding tents so I figured the Soulo was the way to go.

For most people(condition wise) the Akto is more than enough tent for solo use imho

It can be double poled as with any Hille to make it even stronger if one will experience really harsh conditions.

8:22 p.m. on November 30, 2011 (EST)
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I posted this on another thread but figured it would be good to fire it out here as well.

I just found out via email from Hille that they have a mesh inner for the Soulo and it should be out around May. I am thinking that this may not be the only mesh inner being released.

I will definitely be ordering one. It will be $160. Also I would like to mention that Hille has a new catalog coming out in January.  If you email them they can put you on their mailing list to get the catalog when it gets released. 



7:36 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
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I'm drooling....

9:13 p.m. on December 1, 2011 (EST)
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I'm amazed it will only be $160.  And I'm very curious what the total weight will be, with the fly.  I'm guessing more than the Copper Spur UL 1 :).  

I inquired about the catalog, but hoped for a PDF to avoid getting more paper in the mail.  They only offer it in print, in part because it apparently includes fabric swatches.  Hmmm maybe I'll break down and order one.

2:30 p.m. on December 4, 2011 (EST)
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does anyone use an allak?

3:02 p.m. on December 4, 2011 (EST)
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One of the biggest issues with Hillebergs is that what makes them great in poor conditions, makes them stuffy and condensation prone in good conditions.  The primary reason for the fabric inner is to prevent condensation from dripping on you because the fly gomes flush with the ground.  With the mesh inner, there will be a much greater chance of condensation drips hitting you and your gear.

Hillebergs are excellent 4 season shelters but lack ventilation to be good three season shelters.  A mesh inner does nothing for ventilation unless you have the door on the fly open.

4:43 p.m. on December 4, 2011 (EST)
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Or you can get the pole kit, snag up a ul tarp and pitch the inner only.

4:46 p.m. on December 4, 2011 (EST)
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I have found mine to work quite well in BC's mountains during the summer months and the Saivo, especially, is very well-vented and comfortable in hot weather. They are vastly superior in this respect to my old NF tent or most others I have used and you also have the added security of their strength in s mid-summer storm, which is fairly common in mountains.

I would have to say that Hillebergs are just excellent all-around shelters and are the one tent make I feel totally comfortable in recommending to others. The major issue with them, is the price and there are less costly alternatives for less demanding situations. Each to his/her own, but, for me, Hillebergs are the answer for my needs.

8:26 p.m. on December 4, 2011 (EST)
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I found my Akto and Nammatj very hot for 3 season plus treks in Jasper and Banff.  Where you trek is not much, if any different.  BC is all that bad.

I do like the idea that Rick mentions, however.

9:31 p.m. on December 4, 2011 (EST)
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I have spent quite a lot of time living-working on AFS fire towers, as long as five and a half months at a stretch and in the Jasper area and northern Alberta-Wabasca area. BC is quite different in climate from both of these areas and what I found in AB is that, on average, the felt humidity is far worse than anywhere in BC. This may account for some of what you experienced, IMHO.

I agree on the Akto, wouldn't own one and I do not care for the "tunnel" style tents, but, set up in July-August in blazing hot weather here and slept in, I have found the Saivo about the most comfortable tent I have ever used.

Any tent is going to trap some longwave re-radiation, that is one of the whole points for a tent and I prefer to sleep in a bivy-tarp rig in warm weather, but, I just think that if one can only afford one shelter for everything, a Hilleberg is THE best option.

...BC is all that bad...????? 

1:01 a.m. on December 5, 2011 (EST)
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BC is all that bad....only when the Stanley Cup is held there.

What I meant to say is that BC is NOT all that bad.  Some of my most relaxing trips have been in the backcountry there.  

8:26 p.m. on December 5, 2011 (EST)
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I bought a "used" 4 person Nallo directly for Hilleberg this summer.  I put "used" in quotes because it looked brand new to me when I took it out of the box.  I purchased the tent because I wanted to be able to camp year round in the Northwest/ Seattle area  (think lots of rain 9 months of the year) and also  occasionally go snow camping when I snowshoe.

Ironically,  I have only used the tent in dry weather so far but I did not experience any of the condensation problems I have heard some complain of.  On both trips my wife, nine year old daughter and my pooch were in the tent and I never felt cramped or stuffy.  That saying alot since I am a big guy and dont get cold easily.   I do think the tent would certainly be stuffy in a humid area but I think this tent would be overkill in those types of situations anyway.  

As mentioned earlier, H does make a mesh liner you can purchase.  I have not forked over the cash yet but it is on my purchase list because we do like to get over to the dryer side of this state once in awhile.

Finally, in my experience the company does provide excellent service.  When the tent arrived it did not have the guy-lines.  I called and received them 24 hours later.  No questions asked.     

2:08 p.m. on December 7, 2011 (EST)
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Well, I am like a kid on Christmas morning...

Hille-Soulo-1-001.jpg

I am pretty impressed with the fact that not only does the inner and fly go up together but the footprint is attached to the tent and it doesn't have to be removed. So it all goes up in one shot. The footprint also covers the vesti area which is a plus being I don't have to deal with worrying about getting my gear all muddy and soaked. 

Hille-Soulo-1-003.jpg
...it being built like a fortress is a good thing too. 

2:22 p.m. on December 7, 2011 (EST)
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That is one Beautiful tent. Some might say only slight less so than it's American Rep ;)

2:21 a.m. on December 8, 2011 (EST)
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Pretty cool, isn't it? Rick, have you tried taking the inner tent out yet?  You'll be surprised at how much space there is when you do.  I did it just to see how much time it would take me to take the inner down and put it back up. 

2:43 a.m. on December 8, 2011 (EST)
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I actually played with it quite a bit in the yard. Granted this doesn't tell me much but I did it more to become familiar with the set-up of the tent. I think I took it down and set it up 5 times...

Its definitely a solid tent. Thats for sure. It was spitting rain and snow(you can see white specs in the photos above, thats when it first started)while I had it up in the back yard. It was somewhat windy here today too. 

I have seen reference that the tent is wobbly. When not guyed out I agree. At the same time if its windy and one is in their right mind I would think a person would at least set 6 of the 12 lines. 

I will say when all 12 lines are set the Soulo is extremely sturdy. 

I had the inner disconnected and in a pinch it would definitely shelter 2 people. Plus being the fly(outter) goes completely to the ground it will also keep the occupants relatively shielded from the elements. 

I really like the fact that I can disconnect part of the inner to extend vesti space which will accommodate a bigger pack, etc. plus the footprint covers the vesti area so this should help in regards to condensation.

I also have to say the interior is quite roomy.  

There is one feature that made me wonder. Its how the outter extends completely to the ground. I am wondering if pitched on rock in wind if it would cause the ground level edges of the tent outter to fray a bit(think sandpaper.)

Over-all, I am really impressed with this tent from what I see briefly. There has been alot of thought that has gone into this model(ie the rain gutter above the entry point.) The attention to detail is very impressive and the quality of the materials and workmanship well....

I really don't think I need to get into that. You can find all the praise you could ever want as far as the Hilleberg brand goes by reading the reviews here and a Google search. 

...from my initial impression... it is well deserved. 

I am going to take this tent out as much as possible and probably fire a review out on it maybe early June.

I think with what I plan on exposing it too 6 months should be fine. I am not hitting the ridges unless there is at least a foot of snow here.

10:04 a.m. on December 8, 2011 (EST)
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I honestly think that the Soulo is as close to "perfect" for a one-person all-around tent as is available and I am glad that I recently received mr first (red) one back. I like to use different tents for winter and summer uses, due to the very high population levels of Grizzlies here in BC and now I have that option, with both a green and a red Soulo.

I have spent a sufficient number of nights alone in really vile weather in the winter, staying awake to keep kicking the snow buildup off various tents I have had so that they would not collapse on me. With Hillebergs dome tents, I feel more secure than in any other fabric shelter I have ever used and I am seriously considering buying a Saitaris for a hunting base camp tent.

Yeah, they cost a lot, what is your safety/life worth?

3:07 p.m. on December 8, 2011 (EST)
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Dewey(or for that matter anyone), ya ever feel the need to double pole the Soulo?

4:23 p.m. on December 8, 2011 (EST)
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I have doubled the Unna (as I said in my review). Way overkill, at least for the one time I did it last winter. I'm just waiting for heaviest snowfall possible this year to see its full limits!

4:29 p.m. on December 8, 2011 (EST)
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Hey Jake I saw that in the review. Nice job on that by the way. I am wondering if this should be something I may want to consider for heavier wet snow loads being the Soulo utilizes 3 poles. 

Hmmmm...

7:16 p.m. on December 9, 2011 (EST)
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You can also get larger diameter poles for the Soulo, I believe.  You won't need to double pole it, or at least I didn't.

The comment about the fly going all the way to the ground - no issue on granite, but I suspect sandstone may provide an issue.  There is no ventilation at all at the bottom end so make sure to keep the top vent open.

1:03 a.m. on December 10, 2011 (EST)
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No, not as yet and I would not do so for most backpacking trips, usually only a few nights long. I will buy some extra poles for my Saivo and the Saitaris I am probably going to buy next spring, tho' as these tents may be left untended for periods of 2-3 weeks and snow buildup can cause problems.

I have had very costly "expedition" tents seriously damaged by snow in the past and my feeling is that being very cautious in how one deals with this and similar issues is simply common sense. These is little value in allowing an expensive tent to be damaged or destroyed due to a lack of available options to make it more resistant to weather problems, IMO.

6:06 p.m. on December 10, 2011 (EST)
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CWF said:

You can also get larger diameter poles for the Soulo, I believe.  

I know you can go with larger diameter poles for the tunnel type tents being they utilize sleeves. I had a larger diameter pole for my Akto.

I am wondering if a larger diameter pole would work on a dome model being they utilize clips(with half sleeves) which are pretty rigid and designed for the 9mm poles that are stock with the Soulo. 

I am wondering if a larger diameter pole would cause unnecessary stress on the clips and potentially cause them to fail over time. The 9mm poles are a pretty snug fit.

I don't remember reference to utilizing larger diameter poles but I do remember reference to double poling in the literature that came with the tent. 

10:20 a.m. on December 21, 2011 (EST)
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in my continual search for the perfect tent, i am now realizing maybe in need to change some of my parameters. which leads me to this question.....

because i have no experience with hilleberg and no-one close to here sell them, i wonder how the inner tent is attached?  it seems that there is a toggle of some-sort. 

does this keep the inner tent taut?  or does it hang loose inside?  i realize the rainfly is taut, but how about the inner?

11:11 a.m. on December 21, 2011 (EST)
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Look at the first photo in the thread and you will see, close to the mesh, elastic webbing with a plastic toggle.  It is inserted into loops in the fly. Over a period of time, depending on use, the elastic could lose its elasticity. Hilleberg covers it under warranty.  Ask Tipi.  The inner is taut with no drooping.  I have a Kaitum 3 and the inner tent spans a much larger area than the Soulo and there is no drooping whatsoever.

3:51 p.m. on December 21, 2011 (EST)
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From my initial experience with my Soulo the inner seems fine. I could see how it could stretch over time but I believe this would take a good bit of time to occur. 

At the same time as stated by Rob(and previously stated by Tipi,) Hille will cover this if it does happen. 

4:26 p.m. on December 21, 2011 (EST)
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DSC02395.jpg

I have more pics on my profile, did a review as well, of my Hille Unna. Should give you an idea of how it sets up etc....

December 17, 2014
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