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tent vs. hammock

2:05 p.m. on December 14, 2011 (EST)
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I have always tent camped,never even considered a hammock. Then I started hiking with a friend who used a hammock. He seems to get better quality sleep than I did in my tent, every time we go. It is quicker to set up and take down than my tent, which I've used for years. Any way I'm lookin for some pros and cons before I make the big change to a hammock.

2:16 p.m. on December 14, 2011 (EST)
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I tried a hammock once many years ago. Yes, they do set up easier and faster but you have to have tall enough trees and if you go above treeline or out into the desert you may not find anything to tie it to. I found to my experience that they were colder than a tent because the wind can go all around you and cool you down at night. That was my biggest drawback for a hammock and that I often camp where there are no trees are they are not close enough together.

Check out this tent/hammock combo:

Respite Tent

Respite is a shelter made for people on the move. It’s red nylon shell transforms into a hammock when you need to relax after a long day’s hike, and easily turns back into a tent when you need the rest. [link]

 

Click the blue word Link to go to the site.

2:33 p.m. on December 14, 2011 (EST)
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I don't get good sleep in a hammock because I'm not a back sleeper.  I usually sleep on my side or on my stomach.  I'm not real crazy about the movement, either.  Maybe I haven't used the right hammock system or been in one set up correctly.  I just know hammocks eventually become a frustrating sleeping experience for me.

6:05 p.m. on December 14, 2011 (EST)
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Ahhh, the wonderful tent vs hammock debate!

Let me start off by saying that I am a hammock convert. I used tents for many years before going to a hammock. I am much much happier with my hammock setup than I ever was with a tent.

Some general things first. Hammocks are not for everyone. Hammocks have a rather steap learning curve, but once you figure it all out its down right easy. You can sleep in any way you desire in a hammock, they make different kinds of hammocks for stomach sleepers. That being said, at home and all my life otherwise I have been a stomach/side sleeper. In my hammock I am so comfortable that I can sleep on my back now no problem in the hammock. The first few times I used the hammock it did take me quite awhile to fall asleep on my back but now that I am used to it its fine. I did try sleeping on my side which worked fine but wasn;t nearly as comfy as on my back. I even slept on my stomach once with good success. Like I said though, now i can fall asleep no problems on my back in the hammock. If you are a hardcore stomach sleeper then maybe a bridge hammock vice a gathered end hammock is for you as they provide a flatter lay.

Using a hammock requires some though of the whole system to make it all work effectively. If the air temps are below 65-70 most people will get CBS or cold butt syndrome where they begin to get really cold on their backside(side against the hammock body). Well this is esentially the same thing as not using a sleeping pad on the ground. You will get chilled.

To prevent CBS you have to either A)use a pad in the hammock or B) use an underquilt. An underquilt is basically half a sleeping bag that goes around the bottom of the hammock, and most hammock users use a top quilt or an unzipped sleeping bag as a quilt on the top of them. Before I bought an underquilt I used several different pads all with good success, a neoair large, a prolite 4, and a ccf pad. The neoair worked the best because it covered my shoulders fully. Most people that use pads use a small section of ccf or similar to go width wise by their shoulders or use a large pad. Pads will normally slip around in a hammock that is not a double layer and can be frustrating at times. A double layer hammock allows you to put the pad between two layers of fabric so it doesnt slip around on you.

Drafts etc: Yes a hammock setup can get drafty if you don't know how to properly set up your tarp or otherwise insulate the underside of your hammock properly to prevent air gaps. This is a common issue with new hammock users, it just takes a little practice.

I use the Warbonnet Blackbird 1.7 double layer hammock, Warbonnet Superfly tarp, and Hammock gear under quilts. I also just got a Winter Hammock Sock (kinda like a breathable bivy bag to go around the hammock in bitterly cold weather)that I have yet to test. I also have my siberian husky Juno with me on all of my trips.

Without further adoo I give you pros and cons of a hammock system based off my personal experiences.

PROS:

-can set up almost anywhere that has two trees about 10-20ft apart. (12-15 is ideal)

-not limited to flat or semi level terrain, you also dont have to be concerned with brush , rocks, sticks etc

-much more comfortable than a tent/sleeping on the ground

-generally takes up less pack space

-easy and fast setup/tear down, can be very nice for a rest break to lounge a bit while hiking

-In the warmer summer months you can get by without any underquilt/pad which means your pack weight is lighter.

-Hammock makes an AWESOME camp chair, and with your tarp pitched high and wide you have a palace of space to lounge around in, cook etc out of the elements

CONS:

-steap learning curve to learn how to get the system set up just right. It takes some time, practice, and patience, and some trial and error to figure it all out. Most people that have tried hammocks and didn't like them can usually but not always be attributed to not having all of the pieces of the puzzle for a good hammock setup, or setup the items incorrectly.

-1 person only(typically)

-you have to have trees, so you can't set up in a meadow etc where you might be able to with a tent.

- A hammock setup will usually be a little heavier in colder months

Thats all i can think of at the moment, am sure i can think of more later.

Hammocks are awesome!

 

11:33 a.m. on December 15, 2011 (EST)
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I forgot to add that www.hammockforums.net is an awesome community with an overwhelming resource of information on all things hammock related. also check out shug emery's video series on you tube, he did like a 10 or 12 part series on hammocking and all of it's components and I highly recommend watching it. he is a circus clown so they are kinda entertaining too lol

10:50 p.m. on December 19, 2011 (EST)
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I say give it a go!

My thoughts are that you have nothing but time to kill when outside, so what if it took you 10 minutes to get your tent packed, you're not on a mission, you're here for pleasure!

Maybe you don't get good sleep cause you don't have the right pad? I love my Nemo, I love it so much, I sometimes sleep on it on top of my bed (I'm in a dorm room, and the beds are so bad I might as well be on dirt!)

I'm not advocating for or against it, you can only find out for yourself what you like. See if your friend will let you have it for a weekend before you go out and by one. Mike Clelland says he likes to try and experiment with new (or less stuff) every trip and it teaches him his own boundaries every time.

11:34 p.m. on December 19, 2011 (EST)
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+1 on what MikeyBob365 said.

1:20 a.m. on December 20, 2011 (EST)
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There are a number of websites devoted to hammocking, so I'd start by looking for them with Yahoo or Google. Also, there are a lot of videos on YouTube about hammocks. A guy named Shug Emery has quite a few, including videos on winter camping with a hammock. They are informative and entertaining. I've watched some them on winter camping. He will give you a good idea what hammocking is all about.

5:41 a.m. on December 20, 2011 (EST)
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from personal experience, make darn sure that whatever system your using to tie the hammock to the trees, has some type of block so water won't run down the tree, soak the hammock cords and then run inside the hammock

 

I love sleeping in my hammock - but I now put it on the ground.

 

Here's the one I have:

http://www.mosquitohammock.com/junglehammock.html

6:05 a.m. on December 20, 2011 (EST)
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Yes Ed Is right, but most of the hammocks out there in the mainstream right now have a split suspension system which prevents the water running thing for the most part, well that and making sure your tarp extends to that point as well.

When using a solid suspension tied directly to the hammock with no buckle or break it is a straight path for water to follow so you would need to add on a drip line.

8:58 a.m. on December 20, 2011 (EST)
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A hammock is not for me, although I appreciate why others use and prefer them. I need to have shelters that will work in meadows, above timberline and in forest cover of various types. For such uses and given the climate in BC, I prefer to use small 4-season tents for camps and a bivy for emergencies.

Most of my backpack camping is done in hunting season and much of it has also be serious winter camping on long, often solo, snowshoe and ski trips. For such uses, a good mountain tent works best for me and a hammock in -20*F just does not appeal to me.

I also spend a lot of time alone in the part of BC with the greatest density of Grizzly populations and I find the right kind of tent preferable for that, as well. Each to his/her own, but, it's tents for this old mountain geezer.

9:54 a.m. on December 20, 2011 (EST)
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At the winter camping symposium I attended in October I watched a hammock demo and I have to say the idea is intriguing.  I don't know if I will ever give it a try, but the hammock looked comfortable and the gear was amazingly refined.  I think a hammock will be more comfortable to sleep in versus laying on the ground, but I generally prefer the confines of a tent.

1:02 p.m. on December 21, 2011 (EST)
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I'm really not going to make a total change. I'm going to use both. I was gonna make the switch,underquilts and all that specialized gear. I've decided I'm going to use both. EMS has a byers hammock with ropes and I think tree huggers, everything I need for nice weather camping. I live twenty minutes from there main store, I'm gonna go check this thing out. It's $31.99 with no sales tax in N.H., how can u go wrong for that amount of money and almost no weight? I have a old cheap light pup tent, don't laugh it weigh 2.5 pounds using trekking poles. I made a rain fly from silnylon that will double over the hammock. I am going to carry both until the temp drops then go with what I know. I do think a Clark hammock with all the insulation would be the best option in my enviroment. The trails I ramble have lots of rocks and trees and not a lot of tent spots. I find myself camping in the same spots when I would have rather done something else but didn't have time to hunt for a clearing. Anyway thanks for the input, I'm gonna wimp out and ride the fence for now. I'll let you know if I make a decision. Oh yea sug emery is def a circus clown, kinda entertaining but I would prob strangle him if I ever spent much time with him. The first couple of visa he wad funny but he got a little bit annoying, I wonder if it is a act or his normal behavior. Thanks,Mark

1:16 p.m. on December 21, 2011 (EST)
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using both is a good idea

 

When My hammock was filling up with water in a terential deluge (rain fly leaked and water coming in from the suspension ropes) I was able to abandon ship and get my tent set - up before my down bag got soaked

9:00 p.m. on December 21, 2011 (EST)
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For warmer weather use I think a hammock is great. Its light, comfortable(for some) and doesn't take up alot of pack space. 

On the flipside, I would take a tent over a hammock hands down for cold weather use. 

Granted others would argue that point but for me a tent is the way to go. 

Then again alot of the places I like to set up doesn't necessarily have trees so a hammock isn't even an option. 

9:09 p.m. on December 21, 2011 (EST)
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I wished I could do the hammock thing, it intrigues me. I just can't sleep comfortably in them. Whenever some buddies and I go up to a cottage one of them always ends up sleeping in the hammock by the dock. I wanted to try it one night and slept so miserably I've never tried again. And this is with a couple of the 'wobbly pops' in me, so if I can't sleep quickly then, I don't stand a chance ever.

11:20 p.m. on December 21, 2011 (EST)
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When I was very young (back in the last Millenium), the family was living in Honduras. We slept in hammocks much of the time. Even after we returned to the States (the Sonora Desert), we usually slept in hammocks during the summer on our sleeping porch (basically a screened room). They were really comfortable, especially at the temperatures you have even during the night out in the middle of the desert. Later on, when I was doing a lot of climbing in Yosemite, we would bivy on the walls in hammocks (then someone came along and started hauling cots and lawn chairs up the walls and calling them "Portaledges").

Hammocks in winter are far too cold to even consider. When you get above timberline, you could use your climbing pro and hang the hammock from a pair of boulders or even find a pair of cracks in a boulder with a wide enough face (BTDT, not very comfortable).

12:24 a.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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The people I saw claim to sleep in their hammocks in temps well below zero F.  The gear was quite specialized with down underquilts as well as down overquilts - they do not use a sleeping bag.  I'd love to be able to rent this sort of gear for a weekend to give it a try thought I am not sure I'd convert.

7:11 a.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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I am one of those crazy winter hammokers. It is no more specialized gear than if you were using a tent in winter.

WHY? Does everyone keep saying hammocks are cold? A tent will be cold also if you dont have a sleeping pad, or bag appropiate for the conditions. A tent will also be cold if you don't put the rainfly on right and the wind can get in. What I mean by this is if your using adequate insulation(which is easy to do) and you rig your tarp to effectively block the wind you wont be cold. Alot of the comfort factor has to do with hanging your hammock with the proper sag(about 30 degrees on each strap) and your footend a few inches higher than the head end, if it's anything other than that you are bound to be uncomfortable. Some people just don't find hammocks comfortable, but about 3/4 of those that say they are uncomfortable and then learn how to propery hang their hammocks end up a hammock convert. All I can say is if you only tried a hammock once or twice and were uncomfortable your not really giving it a fair shake, especially if you didn;t take the time to learn how to properly set it up.

For a hammock you have a winter under quilt, and a winter top quilt.

For a tent you have a winter sleeping bag, and a winter sleeping pad or pad combo.

You can also if your sleeping bag has a foot zipper for venting and is wide enough put the sleeping bag completely around the hammock. This is refered to in the hammock community as a 'peapod' and it is remarkably effective.

You however do not need that hammock specific items, i started out by using sleeping pads in my hammock and using my sleeping bag as a quilt on top. Having the under/top quilts is nice if you stick with hammocks like I did, but they are no different than all of the components needed on the ground. It's just bottom and top insulation.

You probably wont find a place to rent this gear. However, go over to www.hammockforums.net and introduce yourself. check out the group hangs section, you can probably find someone in your area to meet up with to try out the different items. It is a really great and helpful community.

Bill, those are some interesting concepts on how to hang a hammock above treeline etc. I have heard about using cams, but have never and probably never will try myself. I always seem to have trees around.

10:49 a.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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and then there was no trees um what next ?

12:42 p.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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I love being a hammock camper. They're lighter, pack smaller, and if you ask me, are wayyyy more comfortable. 

All you need is 2 trees to hang to. You don't have to worry about finding even ground, or clearing out rocks or dealing with tree roots. 

If you want to try it you can see if a friend has a spare hammock, most do once they start upgrading and really getting into it. Then you can find out for yourself :D 

4:21 p.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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TheRambler said:

A tent will be cold also if you dont have a sleeping pad, or bag appropiate for the conditions.

I think that is all dependent upon the tent one is utilizing in what conditions. 

I would much rather have to set up my tent in bad conditions(in a rush) as compared to a hammock, tarp, etc especially in high winds. Then again my deep winter tent goes up in one shot. Inner, outter, and footprint.

I'd be willing to bet that I could set up my tent quicker than you could set up you hammock/tarp.

Not too mention, if one is stuck in one spot for a prolonged period due to weather I wouldn't want to spend multiple days in a hammock. 

Also another thought. Being one is elevated in a hammock as opposed to being at ground level in a tent wouldn't you feel the conditions more in a hammock?

I am basing this on the wind being able to circulate under you.

Another question, what does one do to alleviate spindrift issues?

Last thought... Its not really hard to build a wind brake/wall for a tent if need be. 

What does one do for a hammock?

I am just thinking here. You are carrying the hammock, line, 2 quilts, tarp, blah blah blah. Thats quite a few steps for shelter from the elements. 

Kind of a pain in the rear being my tent goes up in one shot and even if I set it up in a down pour it stays dry on the inside. 

On my last 2 most recent trips there were very large trees uprooted all over the mountain due to high wind. What does one do if your hammock would be tied off to one of these trees?

I have looked at hammocks. I think they are great for 3 season use. I am not sold on the deep winter aspect of this at altitude.

In heavy wind trees sway.

Grab the dramamine?

Lets not forget that you have to check every tree you set under for widow makers. Not so much with a tent being I can set up away from trees.

Then again there is always the chance of my getting slammed by an asteroid. :) 

Also, I can fit my 85L pack, boots, etc in my tent protected from the elements. 

Granted, a sleeping bag & a pad is truly needed to be warm in colder temps but how many steps must one perform & how much time does it take to get a hammock set up when you know what is rolling in and you have to get out of it before you get hammered?

A bit longer than a tent from what I can see.

Then there are you pitching limitations. Last thing I want when on trail is limitations of any type.

What do you do if you are above treeline and get caught in a storm? Look for trees? I just set up my tent. 

I am still considering the hammock for 3 season use. Just not for deep winter. No way, no how. 

I think its safe to say that there are pros and cons with either. I just think a hammock carries more cons for deep winter use. 

I am not being snarky with my above post. Just pointing out a few things from general observation. 

6:48 p.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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Rick you make alot of valid points, and I will do my best to address each one.

For starters it doesn't matter if your using a tent, tarp, hammock, bivy, or lean to, in order to use any shelter option in winter or any season for that matter you have to have the appropiate gear for the conditions. For example, no one is going to go winter backpacking without a good sleeping pad such as a exped downmat 9, or other combinations of ccf and inflatable etc or whatever your personal combo is for winter. No one is going to go out without a good sleeping bag rated to whatever temps you will be in. And also no one is going to cowboy camp in the open during a bad storm without any shelter.

I'd be willing to bet that I could set up my tent quicker than you could set up you hammock/tarp.

I can set up my entire hammock setup in less than 5 minutes on average. I pack my hammock and quilts together in one stuff sack(the quilts stay on the hammock while I am out on a trip). I can have the hammock hung between two trees in about 30 seconds on average after I find 2 suitable trees. The tarp is in a seperate stuff sack with lines already attached. I can have the tarp hung and staked out in 2-3 minutes on average. Then I can climb in my hammock and quickly adjust the quilts by just pulling on them as they are on shockcord channels and slide with a tug. Entire setup time including unpacking from the pack is usually less than 5 minutes regardless of the weather condtions. It is really fast and really easy, and no knots to tie. If you include time looking for trees total time is usually about 15 minutes from search to lounging in the hammock. Or you can hang the tarp first, which i do in foul weather.

Not too mention, if one is stuck in one spot for a prolonged period due to weather I wouldn't want to spend multiple days in a hammock.

How is it better spending prolonged periods stuck in a tent? You can sit in a hammock(best camp chair ever IMO), you can lay down in a hamock. If for some strange reason you don't want to sit or lay down in the hammock(unless I am missing something you can only sit or lay in a tent also) then you can sit anywhere on the ground under your tarp that your heart desires. I am far more comfortable spending prolonged periods in my hammock and under my tarp then I ever was in any of my tents. I can cook while sitting in my hammock, or laying in it for that matter. You hang the hammock at 'chair height' just for this reason. Stove is obviously on the ground under the tarp and not in the hammock. One of my favorite things is breakfast in the hammock, haha, you wake up reach out start up your stove and enjoy your nice morning coffee etc right there without ever having to get out of your sleeping bag.

Also another thought. Being one is elevated in a hammock as opposed to being at ground level in a tent wouldn't you feel the conditions more in a hammock?

You are very correct with this statement. Convection is a killer for hammocks. This is why it is critical to learn how to properly rig a tarp for a hammock. The tarp is your primary defense against wind. Your secondary defense is your quilt or pad setup. A well hung under quilt(most are made of momentum or or wind resistant but breathable material) or a regular sleeping pad in the hammock will insulate your underside from the wind and cold. There is also a new item called a hammock sock that I just recieved that I will be testing new years weekend on my next trip. A hammock sock is literaly a sock or tube of material that goes around the hammock and under/top quilts to provide vet another dead air space and prevent drafts. But I have been getting by just fine without the sock so far, but it will be like a bivy and add 10-15F on average and it only weighs 6.25oz so this is a hugh warmth to weight ratio.

Another question, what does one do to alleviate spindrift issues?

Last thought... Its not really hard to build a wind brake/wall for a tent if need be.

What does one do for a hammock?

You do it extactly the same way. don't forget that you are using a tarp with your hammock. You can easily build a wind brake/wall around the tarp if need be.

I am just thinking here. You are carrying the hammock, line, 2 quilts, tarp, blah blah blah. Thats quite a few steps for shelter from the elements.

Kind of a pain in the rear being my tent goes up in one shot and even if I set it up in a down pour it stays dry on the inside.

Well I assume you are carring your tent, poles, tent inner i think you said, maybe a footprint, your sleeping bag, your sleeping pad etc. That sounds like just about the same amount of items to me. The adjustable webbing is semi permenantly attached to the hammock in cinch buckles. I basically have 3 stuff sacks, one with the hammock and quilts in it, one with my tarp and tarp line in it, and one with a few stakes for the tarp.

I find it very easy to set up my system in a down pour. I set up my tarp and then step under it and hang my hammock, there is a biner on each end of the hammock attached to the adjustable webbing you just reach around the tree and clip it to itself and your done. Just as easy breaking camp in the rain too. Very similar to a tent setup just a little different. I have never once gotten my hammock wet during a set up in the rain.

On my last 2 most recent trips there were very large trees uprooted all over the mountain due to high wind. What does one do if your hammock would be tied off to one of these trees?

Well...you pray and then you grab your ankles and kiss your ass goodbye of course! I have been through quite a few strong storms in my hammock setup thus far, and while I have never been attached to a tree that fell it is certainly a risk. Part of the site selection process for a hammock is tree selection, this is crucial that you know how to identify potential hazards. For one you want to be in a grove of trees and not in an exposed area during high winds. This way your trees have other trees around them to help break the wind. That or use natural barriers to your advantage such as on a hill side etc. You have to know how to select a strong and healthy tree. But even if you pick a perfect tree it could still certainly fall, that's just a risk you have to take. The roof of my house could blow off during high winds too, but I still come home every day.

In heavy wind trees sway.

Grab the dramamine?

Maybe it's because I spent almost 10 years in the Navy, but I can barely even tell the trees are swaying while I am in my hammock. If it's REALLY windy the hammock will usually gently sway just a little bit. You have to remember that the hammock is under alot of tension while you are in it. It doesnt have much slack to sway or otherwise blow around. That or I am oblivious to it because I am an ex sailor. I personally enjoy the slight swaying that I cause my self(I shift my body weight to make the hammock start to rock a little and it goes for 5-10 minutes at a time), like my mama is rocking me to sleep =P.

Lets not forget that you have to check every tree you set under for widow makers. Not so much with a tent being I can set up away from trees.

Then again there is always the chance of my getting slammed by an asteroid. :)

 

You certainly do have to check for widow makers, that is what I spend the 5-10 minutes of site selection doing. Looking for strong healthy trees without any widow makers. If you set up your tent near or under trees you should be doing the same thing.

Since hammocks are elevated off the gound we will survive the asteroid impact, it's just physics!!!! The shockwave will just make us sway like crazy and being that I am a sailor I will probably sleep right through it. Though some may get sway sickness and puke all over perfect tenting ground.

Also, I can fit my 85L pack, boots, etc in my tent protected from the elements.

So can I if I so choose to put them in my hammock. I can slide the empty pack under my feet in the double layer of my hammock. I also have a shelf in my hammock for the small items.  But I usually just leave them on the ground under my hammock, that or put the pack cover on and attach the pack to one of the trees I am hanging from.

Granted, a sleeping bag & a pad is truly needed to be warm in colder temps but how many steps must one perform & how much time does it take to get a hammock set up when you know what is rolling in and you have to get out of it before you get hammered?

5-15 minutes depending on how fast you can find trees. AKA the same as normal.

Then there are you pitching limitations. Last thing I want when on trail is limitations of any type

What kind of limitations? The only one I know of is you cant hang a hammock if there are no trees, But I am surround by trees everywhere I go typically. Trees are the only limitation that I am aware of.

What do you do if you are above treeline and get caught in a storm? Look for trees? I just set up my tent.

I am still considering the hammock for 3 season use. Just not for deep winter. No way, no how.

I think its safe to say that there are pros and cons with either. I just think a hammock carries more cons for deep winter use.

Well, you either head down or you sit down and take it like a man. Haha, ok, I rarely go above treeline. Treeline is not hammock friendly. That being said, when I do go above treeline I do so knowing what the forecast is via a weather radio on my gps. I also plan for bail out routes if need be. Worst comes to worse you find the best natural shelter you can and sit tight till it blows past or you keep on walking to a bail out point. Unless it is a white out, few storms are strong enough to literally stop you from moving. It may be nice to stop and shelter in your shelter of choice, but you don't 'have' to. I can't count how many times while I was in Afghanistan(where the mountains range from 12,000ft to 24,000ft) where a bad storm would be rolling in and we kept on truding through. It sucks, but hey what can ya do.

There are pros and cons for both tents and hammock. Though in all actuality the principles of what you need to have to be comfortable don't really change all that much, or they don't have to at least. Hammocking in winter is not nearly as easy as hammocking in summer, and tenting in winter is far easier than hammocking in winter. But the prices I pay for extreme comfort are worth it to me. Hammocks take knowledge, patience, and a few key skills to make it an enjoyable experience. To learn all you ever wanted to know about hammocks visit www.hammockforums.net

Ok I am done... hope I answered all your questions satisfactorily.

6:57 p.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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Great stuff. Thanks for your feedback. It helps tremendously. I am exploring the hammock thing to a great extent. 

I may give it a whirl in the spring being it will be alot easier for me to deal with any trouble I run into compared to if I go for broke in late Jan/early Feb. 

I definitely believe that there is a learning curve associated with the whole hammock thing.

At the same time I always like trying new things. 

Thanks again for the info. Its greatly appreciated. 

7:02 p.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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One thing I would add here is that there are hammocks...and then there are hammocks.

Modern hammocks that are specifically designed and built for backpacking are way different than hammocks made to be hung in your backyard or on your porch, especially net type hammocks.

Even the ENO hammocks (which I have used) pail in comparison to something like a War Bonnet or Hennessey hammock.

Weight is different

Materials are different

Design is different

Cut is different

Quality is different

..and I can assure you the experience is different!

Mike G.

7:08 p.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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Rick, are you still thinking about coming up for the week long trip in early Feb? If so you can check out my hammock set up first hand.

7:09 p.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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Any feedback on the Clark hammock? I am looking at the nx-150/250.

http://www.junglehammock.com/models/nx250/index.php

7:20 p.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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Clarks are good hammocks no doubt although a tad heavy compared to other options. However, i would suggest you look at other options also before you drop that kinda dough on one. I highly recommend the Warbonnet Blackbird series. Other options are:

the bear mountain bridge hammock-bridge hammocks are much roomier due to a spreader bar, and may be more comfortable for someone that cant sleep on their back.

http://www.jacksrbetter.com/BMBH.htm

Warbonnet Blackbird or traveler

http://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/hammocks.php

Then there are the Hennesy hammocks found at REI etc

 

7:23 p.m. on December 22, 2011 (EST)
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I was thinking they(Clark) were somewhat heavy when I was looking at the specs. 

I have read good things on the Warbonnet lines(here & elsewhere.)

Hmmm, here I go again on the research mission. :)

2:42 p.m. on December 26, 2011 (EST)
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I use an ENO DoubleNest right now. It is an extremely comfortable hammock, however, the weight and suspension are not ideal for backpacking. I will probably look for a new backpacking hammock. Probably a Hennessey Scout (If I can drop 20 lbs, since I am 160 and they have a weight limit of 150), or if I want to lay down the big bucks, a Warbonnet Blackbird. 

However, ENO hammocks are GREAT for laying around camp, or around the house. That is what my DN is destined for, which will be a perfect job for it. 

Rick -- If you're serious about getting into hammock camping, check out hammockforums.net -- They have excellent advice from people who have been hammock camping for years, they're friendly, and almost always have people unloading gear, which you can pick up. 

7:29 a.m. on December 30, 2011 (EST)
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"and then there was no trees um what next ?"

 

A good hammock can be set up on the ground and become a tent.

 

Having problems finding two suitable trees? A hammock can be strung up from one sturdy branch.

7:33 a.m. on December 30, 2011 (EST)
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I will walk 10 extra miles searching for trees before I set my beloved hammock up on the ground! Haha, yes yes, ok you can set it up as a bug bivy type of enclosure.

Never thought of the one branch thing, that would work, but cant say i've seen too many really stout branches at ideal hanging height.

April 19, 2014
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