Overboot/Gaiter crossover

4:44 p.m. on January 24, 2012 (EST)
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Years ago I knew a guy who had these gaiters that were more of an overboot, but without the sole. They had a thick rubber rand and fitted snugly over the boot, so that only the sole of the boot was showing.

Does anyone know of anything available like this? I'm looking for something to go over my La Sportiva Makalus. I have some gaiters, but I'm looking for something to cover the entire boot.

Thanks,

J

8:06 p.m. on January 24, 2012 (EST)
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Hmm, not sure exactly how to answer this. Most tall gaiters from reputable places do indeed cover the vast majority of the boot. The problem with a gaiter going all the way down the way you describe it is there is no good way to maintain the proper tension on it all the way around the boot, so over time of walking it would loosen and you would start get to get 'crud' built up under gaiter and soon your entire boot would be surrounded by mud or snow as it is 'pushed' up between the gaiter and your boot.

I use OR croc gaiters and they cover basically the entire boot minus a small section(an inch or so maybe?) near the sole.

Out of curiosity, why don't you want to use a 'regular' gaiter? The only thing that even remotely comes to mind with a thicker rubber rand are the OR salamander gaiters.

9:36 p.m. on January 24, 2012 (EST)
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What your looking for are Super Gaiters.  They protect your boot a little better and add some warmth for extreme cold.  Sportiva used to make them they called them Eiger Gaiters but they started building them right into the boot and discontinued them.  I think Mountain Tools makes a model yet.  Check out their website.  Mtntools.com

9:53 p.m. on January 24, 2012 (EST)
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TheRambler said:

The only thing that even remotely comes to mind with a thicker rubber rand are the OR salamander gaiters.

 
DSCI1273.jpg
SL-w-Gaiters-003.jpg
2011-06-06_17-34-50_557.jpg

:)

7:39 a.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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Ooooo pretty lol, thanks for the pics of the salamanders Rick.

@Mozee and Jay l a, I am really curious as to why you believe these protect your boot 'better'. Regular gaiters made of appropiate material and height for the conditions provide plenty of warmth in the cold, and do a superb job of keeping the outside world out and the inside in aka keeping snow, mud, dust, debris etc out of your boots and off your pant legs.. I have yet to have an issue using OR crocs or dirty girl gaiters appropiate to the conditons.

IMO many more manufacturers would be making them if they were 'all that', thats my 2 cents anyway.

 

9:49 a.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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Honestly in regards to the Salamanders if I had to do it over I would have probably went with the Flex-Tex, Rocky Mtn Low, or something comparable.

I am still trying to put my finger on what is the benefit of the forefoot extension on this model.

I find myself pulling twigs, and other trail debris out of them fairly often.

Also, there is a rigid piece of vinyl/plastic in this area that keeps the shape for this extension(see photo below.)

OR-Salamanders-004.jpg

Now, if one were to utilize this gaiter with a boot/shoe that is all synthetic or a combo of synthetic & leather I would be worried that this mold would cause premature wear on the fabric due to the friction generated from it rubbing while on trail especially if debris gets caught up in it and goes unnoticed for a prolonged period.

Its not a bad model, I just think from quite a few miles on trail that this feature is unnecessary. Definitely wouldn't use them in snow due to the reason TheRambler stated. Snow definitely can and will build up over time in between this extension and your footwear.

1:34 p.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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I have some of the original "Super Gaiters" from the early '70s and they had some features that regular gaiters do not have. Thye covered all of the boot, were insulated and fitted snugly around the lower part of the boot's vamp plus had straps to fit over part of the soles.

They are useful in VERY cold weather, when skiiing or snowshoeing and many outfits offered them. I think that better boot insulation, the NEOS overboot and G/T gaiters slowly killed them off.

I can see them in serious high altitude-cold weather climbing, but, there are better options for mosr backpack hiking.

2:18 p.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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I'm looking for something that keeps water completely off the boot, and turns them into essentially a wellington boot. I'm just looking for the added protection and warmth that these bring.

I'll have a look around and see what I can find.

Thanks,

J

3:08 p.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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I guess i just dont get the benefit of it really. I mean if the toe/sides of your boot need to be that protected from water etc then i would think one was not using appropiate footwear for the conditons.

I feel that a good gaiter like the OR Crocs for example do make your boots into a 'wellington type of boot'. Another option would be to wear a more wellington like boot in conjuction with gaiters. In winter I use TNF Arctic pull ons which are the wellington style, though a little shorter than a typical wellington. There are many other wellington style hiking boots though.

Good luck in your search for these super gaiters, but i fear it may be a long one.

4:28 p.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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There may be no real benefit to this type of gaiter, but I'm a certified gear-head. I saw these some years ago, and have always had a fancy for them. As it's time for new gaiters I thought I'd look at the ones I wanted.

The times I have had water ingress to a boot, it has been where the boot bends on top, about the point a normal gaiter ends. After many hours with wet boots the flexing can force water through even a GoreTex membrane. After having wet feet my last 2 backpacking trips, covering this part of the boot was my first thought.

4:52 p.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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Yup, they have some at MtnTools.

 http://mtntools.com/cat/techwear/Gaiters/mountaintoolssupergaiters.htm

They make them themselves right here in USA.  

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@ Rambler,   I really don't know what to tell ya.  Maybe if you look at the pic you will see that they cover more of the boot therefore adding another layer between your toes and the elements.  I know I don't like trying to untie iced laces.  

I guess I will explain that not all water is frozen when its sub zero and if I happen to be in an environment  or doing activities where that is the case, water or slush can go under my gaiter and to my boot and laces, and super gaiters are nice then.  Also, I might be ice fishing and want the comfort, control and dexterity of a hiking boot but  the warmth of a big ole Lacrosse boot while I'm sitting still at 10 below.  

There are definite benefits of super gaiters, that why MtnTools and others make them.  You just haven't encountered a need for them yet, I guess.

I do use OR exped crocs a majority of the time and will agree that they are very effective.

5:32 p.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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MoZee, yep that's the sort of thing I was looking for, thanks for the link.

5:54 p.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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23oz wow, and a hefty price tag to boot. I am glad to see a pic of them, so i can actually see the difference. I can see the benefit, but me personally wouldn't use them unless i was semi inactive such as ice fishing etc. Seems like they might get way too warm when hiking, assuming that is your wearing a normal winter boot under. Do you wear a normal hiking boot instead of a winter one in this case? I mean unless your in some really brutal cold, i could easily see them being too warm when hiking i'd guess in anything above -15F. Well maybe not 'too warm' comfort wise, but would make your feet sweat much more i would think.

I agree with you 100% about the frozen and iced laces, that is why i went with a pull on boot for winter and havn't looked back since.

To each their own, if they work for you then by all means use em. If you do end up getting a pair you should post a review here on trailspace after you have them out in the field for a bit.

6:55 p.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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MoZee is right, so is Dewey.  i may still have a pair hanging around in my basement.  back before plastic boots or today's waterproof leather mountaineering boots, choices were more limited.  you either had to get a very specialized pair of leather double boots, usually had a layer of felt in them, you could use supergaiters like this to significantly enhance the warmth of traditional leather boots, or you could use overboots that completely cover your boot, including the sole, with strap crampons.  i used supergaiters for winter hiking, skiing and climbing with leather boots.  beneficial because they keep the sole exposed.  used to put a drop or two of rubber cement under the toe of the rand so it wouldn't slip.  they did a great job keeping my feet warm and dry. 

they are very warm on top - they are, as Dewey noted, a sub-zero kind of solution, too warm for most people otherwise.  because they leave the sole exposed, that can be a source of cold radiating to your feet.  the rubber rand is very snug, otherwise it doesn't work as designed.  i would not order these blind; if you are serious about them, call the company/retailer and ask some fairly specific questions about fitting them to your boots.  make sure the rubber rand on the supergaiters doesn't present some issues with the Makalu's midsole.  i haven't used them in years, but i remember them working well with boots that had a reasonably well-defined midsole; i have never seen them on modern boots.   

if you are going to be in extreme cold and plan to be on crampons, snowshoes or skis constantly, forty below makes an excellent range of overboots.  http://www.40below.com/products_results.php?Search=1&ProductCategoryID[]=1 

 

overboots are even warmer than supergaiters; their main limitation is that the sole of the boot is covered, so you can't just walk around in them.  but, they do a much better job resisting cold via the soles.  i have a pair that i haul out on those rare occasions where conditions demand it.  mine (mountain hardwear absolute zeros, discontinued a while ago) don't work well with auto/semi auto crampons; the bottom part of the forty belows probably accommodates modern crampons better. 

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