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4 Season 1P Tent

9:20 p.m. on April 13, 2012 (EDT)
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I am going to be taking a pretty long trip for the next year or so and am going to be living more or less out of my tent. I am looking for a tent that will be able to withstand the many seasons in different areas (Late Summer/Early Fall in South America to Fall in Nepal). Currently I was looking at the Hilleberg Akto 1P Tent and the GoLite Eden 1. I don't really have a price cap but am just looking for some solid advice on this. The GoLite Eden received best all around tent from Backpacker in 2010 but the Hilleberg is supposed to be double walled which would really help with keeping me things dry and dealing with excess condensation.

Any advice is appreciated. Btw I am not tied down to either of these specific tents and am open to any information. Thank you!

Sincerely,

Jake

9:41 p.m. on April 13, 2012 (EDT)
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Welcome to Trailspace, Jake! 

If I were buying a 1 person tent to handle true all season all weather tent, hands I would go with a Hilleberg Soulo. Though the Akto is a 4 season tent, is more cramped and will not handle severe weather or snowfall as effectively or "gracefully." 

If you must choose between the Akto or Eden, my choice would depend a couple things. If I wasn't going to be heading out into real winter weather, and budget is a consideration, I would go with the Eden. If, however, I would be taking into the cold and snow, I would go with the Hilleberg. 

They are pricey, but the hille product and service are unparalleled.  

Just my opinion :)  There are others here who have FAR more experience than I, many of whom will likely chime in

Also, take some time to go through prior threads on here, there are many that the tent topic extensively from every angle. The search bar above may help with that. 

Best of luck! 

9:49 p.m. on April 13, 2012 (EDT)
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Hey Jake, I saw your other thread and didn't get a chance to chime in so first and foremost I want to take the opportunity to welcome you to Trailspace.

So ya want a 4 season solo tent...

Neither of the 2 tents you mention above are freestanding. Something ya may want to take into consideration being this could be a pain in the tail dependent upon pitch locations. You have to have them staked out to pitch them "correctly."

This is typical of hoop designs. 

I have a Hilleberg Soulo and I would put it up against any 4 season solo on the market.

Feb-2012-LHHT-006.jpg

The Soulo is completely freestanding... Even the vestibule. I owned the Akto(got swiped) awhile back and I liked it but the Soulo is definitely more solid than the Akto. Plus another thing to consider is that if you are going to encounter snow you may want to go with a dome. The Akto will not shed snow as well as the Soulo.

I personally do not care for pole sleeves. They can be a pain in very windy conditions. 

The Soulo utilizes half sleeves for the lower portion of the shelter and the rest of the tent attaches to the poles with clips. 

I would suggest that you take a look at the Soulo. It is a bomber solo shelter.

Here are a few more pics of mine:

Hille-Soulo-1-001.jpg

Hille-004.jpg

LHHT-January-2012-006.jpg

I also have the footprint for mine. The Soulo has a pretty thick floor(70D) so the footprint isn't what one would call necessary but for what I have into the tent its worth it to me. Another nice thing about the footprint is that it also covers the vesti area so you are not setting your gear down on wet ground as seen in the photo below:

Hille-Soulo-1-003.jpg
Plus the footprint attaches to the tent so setting the tent up is all done in one shot.

Also I would like to mention if you decide to pitch the tent w/o the inner the foot print gives you a dry surface to sleep on. 

If I had to put my faith in a tent the Soulo would be my first choice in the solo market. 

Pricey, yes but if you can swallow the price tag and have the coin to drop on it it is a tent that is worth every cent. 

There is a video on youtube by CrawlingRoad(not mine) that takes a pretty good look at the Soulo.

I have yet to review this tent but plan on it in the not so distant future. 

Here is the video if ya want to take a closer look at the Soulo:

Hope this helps and I hope ya have a great trip. If ya have any questions please by all means fire away. 



10:27 p.m. on April 13, 2012 (EDT)
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My Suolo a few weeks ago in the morning (before sunrise, and still snowing) after an overnight 2 foot snow dump


20120317Hille3.jpg

At this point, I had shaken the snow off preparatory to packing it up. Despite the snow being fairly damp and dragging a little of the snow inside with me (tried to shake most of it off in the vestibule), there was virtually no condensation inside the tent (really good ventilation setup).

Here is a shot during the night, before the snow really piled up.

20120317Hille4.jpg

10:33 p.m. on April 13, 2012 (EDT)
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If you are 'living out of your tent' then why restrict yourself to a small solo shelter (although the Eden is actually a decent size - the Soulo and Akto are small)?  Since you don't seem to be looking at freestanding shelters what about the Hilleberg Nallo all season shelter?  2 person but really more a 1+ gear shelter.  Lots of room and only a pound more than the Akto and Eden and weighs the same as the Soulo but a bunch more room.  You can vary the ventialtion 'high and low' for the warmer periods with the Nallo and batten it down when things get nasty. 

11:27 p.m. on April 13, 2012 (EDT)
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Don't know about which tent to buy but if I were going to live out of a tent for a year I would seriously consider a 2 man.

12:27 a.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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If it were me, I'd take the new Hilleberg Anjan that is coming out. Great ventilation, low weight and quite spacious. Plus the Kerlon fabric will hold up better (UV degradation) over that period of time than other fabrics, I believe.

DISCLAIMER: I'm a Hilleberg retailer.

12:45 a.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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Yup - forgot about the Anjan (the 3 plus season Nallo).

2:07 a.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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I just wanted to say thank you so much for all the help you guys have provided. I am considering everyone's advice very much so and I just wanted to tell you how appreciative I am that you all took time to help me out :). I am going to continue to look into it all. Thanks again

3:43 a.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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Hey Jake, Welcome to trailspace.

The best advice I can give you is to take your time in regards to buying your gear, esp. if you will be living in it for a long period of time. There are a ton, and I me a ton of high quality tents on the market both new and used. I'd do some researching regarding tents on Trailspace (I'm quite partial to Trailspace's Gear Review section over all other sites IMO) and other sites if you want to figure out what tent best fits your needs. If you have an REI and or any other mountaineering stores in your area then I'd start there. One of the best things to do is to get in a tent at the store with your gear or use some store gear to see how it feels to be in the tent. Imagine being stuck in the tent for a while and then think about how much room you might need if your there for a few days solid due to weather. Each of use here has brands and models that are our favorites, myself included. Truth be told there are a lot of companies making quality tents. The other thing to think about is over buying, don‘t buy more tent then you need, unless your like me and you really want to. On the other hand don’t under buy, less tent than you need, that’s where the research comes in. It is best to err on the side of over buying than under buying however. Another thing to think about is the fact that you will be traveling in foreign countries. Some times it's best not to have "brand names" and or "flashy gear" as this can be an advertisement to theft. Nothin like getting stuck far from home with nothing! There is much "as new" gear being sold on EBay and Craigslist as well as gear that has only seen 1 or 2 uses for vast amount of savings. Take your time. All to often I see people making rush buy's only to find it's not the gear for their needs. Once you've narrowed down the field then it will be much easier to recommend one tent over another. As it stands right now I can think of over 30 quality tents to recommend, and that does not include tents of a few years past. I do relize that you are interested in the Golite vs the Hilleberg but I'm going on the fact that you said "Any advice is appreciated. Btw I am not tied down to either of these specific tents and am open to any information."

4:30 a.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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As previously stated: 2 man, second hand backpacking tent with three poles and a large vestibule - something from the 90's. Trash it and then try and recycle it (make things like peg and pole sacks from the good fabric bits, easton pegs from the poles, etc).

A year is a long time to live in a tent. All kinds of bad things can happen to a good tent in that time (like drunks falling on it).

The new Hilleberg '3 season' tents have a very, very thin fabric and the price will have to come down eventually, especially in the UK (saw one last week).

11:59 a.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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I know that Prolite Gear in Seattle had a Nallo 2 pitched outside for.....3 years and although the canopy was faded, it was still completely waterproof.

Kerlon fabric is the best.

2:06 p.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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how about a bibler ahwahnee.  4 season - free standing - roomy for 1 + gear - opens up for great ventilation - closes tight for warmth

(i know it's a desperate attempt to sell mine.  lol)

8:58 p.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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Yeah it looks like I'm going to be spending a majority of time in Central and South America and then only some time in Nepal during September, October, and early November. But while I am over in Nepal, I will be staying on a farm which has offered me a room within the house in exchange for working on the farm.

The Nallo sounds like an incredible tent, especially because I intend on traveling all over it seems like this would be the best long term investment, not only because of the very durable material but just in case I did decide to spend some time in a much colder, snowier area. For the most part I will be within tropical areas and the Nallo would clearly be great for this as well.

While the Anjan also looks like a great tent, it doesn't really offer the full weather-covering versatility that the Nallo would (if anyone has any comments, stories, or information that would debunk this statement, I would be more  than happy to hear). While it doesn't look like I will be spending time in snowier areas I would like to have the option if the situation arose.

Please keep the advice and information coming as it is so constructive and very helpful to me making an educated decision. Thank you very much again.

9:33 p.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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Saying "Central and South America" covers a lot of territory. I used to live in Bolivia. The environment there ranges from Amazon jungle to dry high altitude of the Altiplano to heavy snow in the Andes and everything in between.

I would look for something with enough room for all of your gear, plus you, plus another person (never know who you might meet) and their gear. This will be a fairly heavy tent, but will be worth it over the long haul. Also, get one with a vestibule. Having camped in heavy rain, a vestibule is a must. My old SD Flashlight didn't have one and even a small one would have been a big advantage. I spent a bit of time in it with another person, but she was my girlfriend at the time-also a big advantage when the tent is small.

 

10:53 p.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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If your looking to camp on the cheep. I would recommend this military surplus bivy bag. They are inexpensive on ebay. I have been told on this website you need to vent your breath outside the bag in snow conditions.


bivy.jpg

You will also need some heavy duty trash bags for your pack, to keep it dry. Combine this bag with a nice tarp and you have a pretty good camp. Don't put it too close to fire as with any tent or bivy bag. It's also not heavy if your hiking very far.



11:02 p.m. on April 14, 2012 (EDT)
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If you don't have a cap money wise maybe take a look at the Hille Jannu, or even the Allak for that matter.

My thought is when pitched correctly (into the wind) tunnels are not bad but if the wind changes direction and is hammering into the side of the tent it can make for a long nite. 

Ear plugs are a nice thing. :)

12:45 a.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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"My thought is when pitched correctly (into the wind) tunnels are not bad but if the wind changes direction and is hammering into the side of the tent it can make for a long nite."

Not bad?  Hilarious.  Tell that to the Artic explorers who use tunnels exclusively. You do know that tunnels have side guyouts, right?

Backpackinglight.com is doing a 3 part analysis and review of tunnel tents, of which their superiority in wind performance will be confirmed.  You have to be a member to read the first part.

1:15 a.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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Okie dokie. I guess thats why all of the climbing outfitters use them on summit high camps CWF.... cough uh hum I mean Family Guy.

Oh wait, they typically use domes. Maybe there is a reason for that(like unpredictable wind direction shifts?)

Ummmm... I guess at lower altitude tunnels are fine being that a dome utilizes a frame system in which the poles intersect and cross wouldn't be as stout as a tent where you have 2- 3 separate poles which don't intersect and they are divided by anywhere as much as 1-2+ feet of fabric.

Oh, did I mention the sidewalls on tunnels are more vertical which would equate to basically having the wind resistance equivalency of a brick?

Yep, you're logic makes complete sense to me.

What was I thinking, duh.

You're right.

Just like you were and everyone else wasn't when you strongly suggested that a inexperienced individual take a minamalist shelter to an island off the Bering Sea.

Take you tunnel and let wind gusts smack it broad side with 50 mph gusts and I will stay in my dome.

Its just a preference, and a suggestion. No need for the "hilarious" comment.

(Shakes head and backs away from the keyboard.)

I'm not even goin to honor this with any further comment towards you. That is basically all I have to say on the matter.

1:24 a.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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I just can't believe all of the those Arctic exployers are still alive.

Matty is crazy!

http://www.northwinds-arctic.com/matty.html

Regarding the CWF comment, I couldn't register under FamilyGuy so I did CWF.  Then I simply separated the names. Any issue with that or is this causing you some angst?

(cough? Really?)

1:34 a.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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I would post scientific research as well as wind testing data but I am sure you would argue with that data as well so I am not going to take this any further.

A dome for true 4 season use is designed to handle wind better from multiple shifting directions than a tunnel(my opinion from experience.)

As far as you screen name goes I could care less if you called youself Santa Claus.

Then again if you were Santa I would send ya a list of some of the new gear I want for xmas. :p

Anywho, your screen name doesn't change my day in the least.

It just seems to me that all you want to do is poke at people until you get a reaction out of them. I find that very sad at best.

Out of respect for the others here and mainly the op I will not go any further with this discussion other than saying this:

This is a fun, happy community that likes to discuss what they love and the experiences that go along with them.

Its fine that we disagree. I personally am glad that we do because if we all agreed the world would be quite boring to say the least.

I just think there is a substantial difference between disagreeing and being argumentative.

At the same time if everyone agreed we would all have the same gear/preferences and a community such as TS wouldn't exist.

There would be no need because there wouldn't be much to talk about gear wise.

So keep disagreeing. Just drop the argumentative tone.

Have a good one Family Guy.

4:16 a.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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Arctic explorers use and have used a variety of tent types, among these are the Black's of Greenock pyramids designed and built for that expedition by snowmobile, IIRC, headed by Will Steger in the late '60s. I spoke with one of the Black's staffers in the old Ottawa store about this tent in 1974, while taking my Canadian Ministry of Transport-Coast Guard radio training in that city.

Dome shapes work very well in the Arctic conditions as witness the "Igloo" one of Canada's most enduring cultural symbols and, again, this comes from firsthand discussions with people who have used these for many years, while living with Eskimos.

The Hilleberg Saivo is used in the Antarctic, so we are told and given my experience dealing with Hillebergs, I accept what they say in complete confidence.

I prefer dome style,free-standing tents to tunnels and have owned and used enough of both in fairly harsh conditions, plus four pyramid or tipi type tents to form an opinion based on actual field use.

So, no offence intended, but, I have to disagree with FG's point concerning the exclusive use of tunnels in the Arctic. I think that other types also work and are used in that region.

7:46 a.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

..I just think there is a substantial difference between disagreeing and being argumentative...

 No there isn't! (Holds sides of head tightly in both hands.)

Ed

8:24 a.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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Good one Ed.   Haven't seen that one in years.

8:32 a.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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Hey Jake,

I spend a year in China Mongolia and N.Z, most of the time out camping/trekking and used a 3 Season tent. Then couple of years ago I went to central Asia, pamir and Kyrgyzstan - big high mountains...this time I took with me a 4 season tent (G1 Ultra by lightwave - great tent).

But for the next time going for a long trip, some clasic backpacking and trekking? I'll take an ultralight tent and will be happy with it - and no - I'm not an ultralight guy - but I think that for the time you just carry your tent around during a (year?) you travel around and the X time you spend in it?

So yes, I did went up trekking solo in the Pamir, camped in snow at 5000M and enjoyed my 4 season lightwave, but it was for few nights of hard use - and I think I could do just fine with something lighter, and even more important - smaller when packed. I took with me a 80L pack and now I want to go next with my 45-70L backpack.

So before getting any tent, I will think how hard you are really gona use it, and is that extreme really gona be so extreme that you will need a 4 season tent - are you planning to practice mountaineering? trekking? solo or with other people? by yourself or with a company?

I don't mean to underestimate what ever you are planning to do, on the contrary. but make sure you buy what you need, and light and small is great when you try to put it on top of a jeep, bus or what ever and so on...

I will think about tarptent http://www.tarptent.com/

Nir

12:28 p.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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And no offense taken, Kutenay.  This is what this is all about - options and counterpoints.  I disagree that tunnels are "not bad," let it be known, and that is where I stand. I never said domes where not the better 4 season snow shelter as they have more static strength.  But I believe tunnel tents have more dynamic strength because they flex sufficiently in the wind to not completely resist it and therefore bend with the wind creating more absolute strength. Much like how they build tall buildings in areas with very high winds.  My initial response wasn't argumentative; it is what I (and apparently others) believe.

Rick, you are either overly sensitive or don't like opposing opinions.  Or maybe you don't like Santa Clause but regardless, I intend to provide options from experience because this is what responsible people do.

I love Monty Python.  I also love Tarptent (nice post Nir).

1:41 p.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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I simply disagreed with your dogmatic statement that ...Arctic explorers use tunnel tents exclusively... as this is not factually the case. I have not been in the actual Arctic, but, have been in "the sub-Arctic" and not as a member of some tour, I worked there and have been repeatedly asked to go back to working there for almost 15 years, so, I have some experience on which to base my opinions.

My wife HAS worked in the Arctic as an "outpost R.N." and, I used to spend time with an old friend of my aunt's, some forty years ago, Mr. Arthur Eide, who retired from a life in the Arctic,  to a ranch at Ymir, BC and later to Nelson, BC, my hometown.

I met him by accident, as soon as he heard my surname, he knew who I was and invited me to tea and showed me his collection of artifacts from the Arctic and told me many anecdotes of life there as he lived it for decades. He was a good friend of my late aunt Margaret's, in "The Sons of Norway" and a fascinating guy to talk with.

His books are now, OP, AFAIK, but, the more well known title is, "Drums of Diomede" IIRC and he was the real deal.

 

1:44 p.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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Family Guy said:

Rick, you are either overly sensitive or don't like opposing opinions.  Or maybe you don't like Santa Clause but regardless, I intend to provide options from experience because this is what responsible people do.

You're right, I'm both... I am done beating this drum(I do think Santa is a swell guy btw.)

Oh real quick, "not bad" = good.

I suppose on the flipside you may very well be overly "analytical." 

Just remember your experiences and opinions are just that...

Yours.

You are not the only individual that possesses experience nor are you the only individual that has opinions. 

My biggest thing is when you start coming off as being snide. I mean, what did the hilarious comment do to contribute to your statement?

Nothing positive. It could have been conveyed w/o it.

No harm no foul. Let's move on to better things.

So now the op is looking into 30 man, non free-standing tents that will survive the worst blizzard known to man, 300mph winds, and is suitalble for summer use... Wait a sec, thats not right. :p

1:45 p.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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For the OP, I also highly recommend the Hilleberg Soulo and I have two of these, a winter one in red and a hunting one in green. These little tents will take weather like few others and are super-easy to setup in harsh conditions.

For me, having lived in small mountain tents for many weeks at a stretch, I would prefer a Hilleberg Allak for general use or a Jannu for winter and this last is one tent I would love to have for solo winter camping in BC's mountains, just a superb little rig for one person, yet, good for two if needed.

4:02 p.m. on April 15, 2012 (EDT)
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I do not have the Upper Latitude experience some members here have so I don't have an opinion on what type of shelter does what in heavy snow / wind.

I have stayed out for extended periods a few times and my preference would be for a two man tent with a sizable vestibule. This would be especially true if I were base camping vs. daily trekking. 

For years I carried an 8 lb. (3.63 kg) two man 3 - 4 season convertible tent with a 17 sq. ft. vestibule. I still use the tent in winter but now have a smaller solo tent with a mesh inner for warmer weather and short trips.

Having a two man shelter is more conducive to living out for longer periods if you can deal with the extra weight. You have room to keep extra / winter clothing & gear handy, room for repair work, room for spreading out maps, and room to play solitaire while you wait out nasty weather.

I have used a large vestibule for keeping firewood dry, a place to change out of cold, wet clothes, a shelter for my backpacking dog, and a place to bury valuables while I was out of camp fishing all day.

Staying long term in a solo shelter is not something I would want to do given the option of a two man shelter.

A shelter will turn into your own little apartment after a while and you will appreciate the space to move about and keep things handy.

At least that's what my few experiences leads me to think.

Mike G.

4:11 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Having climbed Everest 235 times, and having personally been knighted by the Canadian Prime Minister, and having wrestled a Polar Bear while working as a Canadian Mountie, and having single-handedly chewed down and devoured a Pine tree, and having shown them Yanks a thing or two about extreme survival, I recommend the most expensive Hilleberg made. It's the only sane choice for surviving a night out at Grouse.

4:43 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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The Akto, Soulo and Eden look sweet, but I think I'd have to go with a 2-man tent. Imagine getting stuck in a one-man tent for a few days in a raging downpour or a blizzard! Living in a small tent might also be fine for a few days or even weeks, but if it's more than that I think it would start feeling a bit cramped. And if you want to keep your gear a bit safer, especially in a third-world country, it's nice to have a vestibule and some extra space inside.

Apeman had a point - there are dozens of good tents out there, and we all have our personal biases. if you don't know which one will work best for you, maybe try renting a few of different sizes, designs and weights and try them out. I'm stingy and impatient; I don't want to spend more than a couple of hundred on a tent, and I want to get it up and take it down as fast as I can. You're not as concerned with money, and you might be less worried about how long it will take to set up your tent.

One concern I would have is that a lot of great tents (and other gear) that can be worth more than a third-world peasant earns in a year. I'd be looking very seriously at buying a good-but-well-used tent for next to nothing. At least you'd stand less chance of becoming a target.

4:45 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Hey jad- I think you are on the wrong forum. Folks like you seem to feel more comfortable providing useless trolling posts over at www.backpacker.com.

This place is somewhat more civilized, courteous and respectful.

4:47 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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This place is somewhat more civilized, courteous and respectful.

 Thanks, vigilguy

4:58 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Who's trolling? I've done a lot in my 64 years. Why my personal friends Jack O'Conner and Ernest Hemmingway would testify to my benevolence and work/life resume if they were still alive. I figured that when I depart this life I'd like to leave something behind even if just to be remembered on some man's lodge pole.

5:35 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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jad said:

Having climbed Everest 235 times, and having personally been knighted by the Canadian Prime Minister, and having wrestled a Polar Bear while working as a Canadian Mountie, and having single-handedly chewed down and devoured a Pine tree, and having shown them Yanks a thing or two about extreme survival, I recommend the most expensive Hilleberg made. It's the only sane choice for surviving a night out at Grouse.

 Hilarious.  Lightens the mood a bit.  Well done.

5:36 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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vigilguy said:

This place is somewhat more civilized, courteous and respectful.

 I think the operative word is 'somewhat.'

5:40 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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I think the operative words are "chest beaters".

5:44 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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1)Treat others with respect.
Listen to others’ points of view, opinions, and experiences. Refrain from rushing to judgment of any Trailspace community member or guest poster.

5)Be civil and polite.
Even if you disagree with someone (and you will), keep your differences of opinion civil and polite. You can disagree without being disagreeable. Remember, Trailspace is a community; be a positive part of it.

6)Stay on topic. Be constructive.

Do not repeat the same points over and over ad nauseam, but contribute positively and help move conversations forward. Use the Off-Topic Forumfor non-backcountry topics. Start a new thread in the appropriate forum when necessary.

 

5:45 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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As a matter of fact, I don't care who you are or what you've done. What's so hard about just giving a gear opinion? Can't some of you just say hey I've owned/tried this and here's what I think of it, blah blah blah. All this prequalification and I'm a cool guy that has been there done that crap just turns me off.

5:52 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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I don't see the post as being anything but humorous or is that no allowed?

5:54 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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peter1955 said:

The Akto, Soulo and Eden look sweet, but I think I'd have to go with a 2-man tent. Imagine getting stuck in a one-man tent for a few days in a raging downpour or a blizzard! Living in a small tent might also be fine for a few days or even weeks, but if it's more than that I think it would start feeling a bit cramped. And if you want to keep your gear a bit safer, especially in a third-world country, it's nice to have a vestibule and some extra space inside.

Apeman had a point - there are dozens of good tents out there, and we all have our personal biases. if you don't know which one will work best for you, maybe try renting a few of different sizes, designs and weights and try them out. I'm stingy and impatient; I don't want to spend more than a couple of hundred on a tent, and I want to get it up and take it down as fast as I can. You're not as concerned with money, and you might be less worried about how long it will take to set up your tent.

One concern I would have is that a lot of great tents (and other gear) that can be worth more than a third-world peasant earns in a year. I'd be looking very seriously at buying a good-but-well-used tent for next to nothing. At least you'd stand less chance of becoming a target.

 Peter makes an important point here and while I do not have the international traveling experience of many here, I have wondered about this issue of attracting thieves and worse to your camp or person. So, using a Hilleberg or other pricey tent-bag-pack may be an invitation to an encounter of an unpleasant kind. It is certainly something to consider carefully, IMHO.

5:55 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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jad said:

As a matter of fact, I don't care who you are or what you've done. What's so hard about just giving a gear opinion? Can't some of you just say hey I've owned/tried this and here's what I think of it, blah blah blah. All this prequalification and I'm a cool guy that has been there done that crap just turns me off.

 Great. I'll consider you "turned off" then, and look forward to never hearing your opinion again.

5:59 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Suit yourself, and that reminds me, you're back on ignore.

6:01 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Dewey, I agree with your last post. Now see, was that so hard?

6:03 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Family Guy said:

I don't see the post as being anything but humorous or is that no allowed?

No I am just stating that this is getting somewhat off topic among other things. Nothing wrong with humor as long as it is relative to the topic of discussion. 

6:21 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Well one thing I think most people agree on is that Hilleberg is the gold standard for tough. And Petra is fun.

6:24 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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jad said:

And Petra is fun.

 Petra as well as Hilleberg as a whole have been nothing short of accommodating and pleasant from, the experiences I have had with them...

6:50 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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jakejsims said:

I am going to be taking a pretty long trip for the next year or so and am going to be living more or less out of my tent. I am looking for a tent that will be able to withstand the many seasons in different areas (Late Summer/Early Fall in South America to Fall in Nepal). Currently I was looking at the Hilleberg Akto 1P Tent and the GoLite Eden 1. I don't really have a price cap but am just looking for some solid advice on this. The GoLite Eden received best all around tent from Backpacker in 2010 but the Hilleberg is supposed to be double walled which would really help with keeping me things dry and dealing with excess condensation.

Any advice is appreciated. Btw I am not tied down to either of these specific tents and am open to any information. Thank you!

Sincerely,

Jake

 I have copied the OP in hopes this thread will refocus on helping Jake with choosing the right tent for his needs. As Rick points out, differences of opinion are fine, but snide or disparaging remarks are not helpful.

Clean, civil, and on topic please.

Mike G.

9:41 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Hi Jake,

Sounds like a great life adventure. If you are considering the Eden and Hille, I might suggest a Golite Shangri-La 2. BUT ONLY IF YOUR ADVENTURES INCLUDE TREKKING POLES IN YOUR GEARSET. Not freestanding, but lightweight (lighter than most 1 person tents), spacious, strong, and built to stand in all but the most extreme conditions. Get the bug nest and the fly, forget the bathtub floor option, at least initially. The tent fly/nest is 45 Square Feet, weighs 3lb 2oz with 6 7000 series alloy Y-stakes, has 9 guyout points per broadside and 4 per end, and can even be pitched from trees/structures above instead of using the poles. It is very versatile and strong. I have slept comfortably in single-digit winter weather despite about 9 inches of snow fall overnight, without problems. Walls were not caving in on me at all. Check out review videos on you tube. you can get it from Golite direct for $250. The catenary cut, modified pyramidal design has years of proven success in even extreme conditions. When it's hot and the weather is clear, sleep in only the bug nest for PERFECT stargazing.

I do stress that this is not as strong in deep snow and extreme, swirling winds as a free-standing Hille, but I can tell you that good quality trekking poles are plenty strong compared to tent poles, and the design of the SL-2 sheds snow very well. With all of the guyout options, it can definitely take a beating. Treat it with a spray application of Nikwax Solarproof and it will more than handle the environs you have planned and for years beyond - with NO weight penalties. I think that a full 4 season Hille might be overkill for your needs...I do love them though. 

happy shopping and have fun! 

9:53 p.m. on April 16, 2012 (EDT)
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XterroBrando said:

The catenary cut, modified pyramidal design has years of proven success in even extreme conditions. 

 Indeed.  Great suggestion.

4:39 a.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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I was in the toy shop the other day, looking for moshi monsters, when I saw something that reminded me of these tent threads.

Remember those "Top Trumps" cards, with a photo of some military hardware and a list of values for specific aspects, which you would then compare with the other person's list to win/lose that card? Well, someone should do a pack of cards for tents!

It is going to get even worse when the bloke on backpackinglight.com finishes his report on tunnels.

7:46 a.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Personnally, I just purchased a shangri la 3 on sales on golite, with the floor. I wanted to use it exclusively during the canadian winter but i think it will soon become my main shelter.  It's lightweight, easy to set up and seems to shed winds very effectively. It may not be the best shelter in some situation but can easiky modified.

8:34 a.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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jad said:

As a matter of fact, I don't care who you are or what you've done. What's so hard about just giving a gear opinion? Can't some of you just say hey I've owned/tried this and here's what I think of it, blah blah blah. All this prequalification and I'm a cool guy that has been there done that crap just turns me off.

Sigh.  Well let me personally appologize if I bore you!  (hands tightly clutching sides of head.)

I will wager for every person, who like you, could care less about what experience backs up a given person’s posts, there are a dozen others who are curious and very interested in determining if someone is speaking with authority, or just talking out of their hat.  I don’t suppose you take the same flippant attitude, caring less about prior experience, when choosing which doctor’s advice you should heed?  While no one here can be sued for malpractice, nevertheless there are topics discussed around these parts that do have serious consequences; in fact some are of mortal import.  Certainly even a self described slacker doesn’t want some Jerk Wad expounding on tents, only later to find out the JW’s total wilderness experience was gawking at the naked autochthons in National Geographic.

While folks waxing on about their exploits comes across to you as self aggrandizing, some of this blustering also provides relevant depth to posters’ opinions.  For example, someone prefers the Marmot driclimb windshirt as the “do it all” jacket, but I have no idea if this opinion is relevant to my needs, since it is not supported by an explanation why one would hold this opinion.  In fact for all I know it is the only such garment the poster has ever owned.  You see, it is hard to qualify such an opinion when it lacks context.   On the other hand the opinions posted about Kayland boots are backed up with concise, if bereft, supporting statements.  In fact I would hazard to say comments like “After years of screwing around with lots of brands for hiking/backpacking…” sound very similar to the chest beating you find so boring.  But far be it from me to suggest the author curtails his practice of qualifying his opinions with references to his experience.

Lastly you may bore of the longwinded comments some have authored here – indeed some have digressed to places better left behind.  But your contributions to this thread dwell mostly on the personalities participating and their prosaic styles, with almost no effort made to respond in context to the OP’s query.   What is that about?  And on that point I will cease and desist before I stray somewhere better left behind…

Ed

9:09 a.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Say Jake, a lot of good advise so far, though I can’t determine if any of it is relevant for one important reason: You mention places and seasons, but do not provide details on the climates you expect. 

You’ll be in Asia; what season is the monsoon?  Will you be in snow? How 'bout sand storms?  Have you considered sun exposure?  Likewise where in South America, and when.  You do realize “Late Summer” in South America occurs in different months, depending on your latitude.  Also being in South Americat could be a rain forest, desert, or alpine setting.  Paint us a better picture of the weather you anticipate. 

Personally I try to sleep out under the stars whenever possible.  A bug net probably is advised, and for the really wet venues a dining tarp in addition to whatever sleep shelter you bring.  In fact I would be temped to bring the smallest tent that will stand up to what you anticipate, and augment it with a dining fly.  I find living out of a tent long term is too confining, and prefer using them only for sleep.  Thus the dining fly is my living room. 

Ed  

9:27 a.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

I will wager for every person, who like you, could care less about what experience backs up a given person’s posts, there are a dozen others who are curious and very interested in determining if someone is speaking with authority, or just talking out of their hat.  

 An excellent observation, Ed. 

The rest of your thoughts were very astute and well said.  

10:20 a.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

Say Jake, a lot of good advise so far, though I can’t determine if any of it is relevant for one important reason: You mention places and seasons, but do not provide details on the climates you expect. 

You’ll be in Asia; what season is the monsoon?  Will you be in snow? How 'bout sand storms?  Have you considered sun exposure?  Likewise where in South America, and when.  You do realize “Late Summer” in South America occurs in different months, depending on your latitude.  Also being in South Americat could be a rain forest, desert, or alpine setting.  Paint us a better picture of the weather you anticipate. 

Personally I try to sleep out under the stars whenever possible.  A bug net probably is advised, and for the really wet venues a dining tarp in addition to whatever sleep shelter you bring.  In fact I would be temped to bring the smallest tent that will stand up to what you anticipate, and augment it with a dining fly.  I find living out of a tent long term is too confining, and prefer using them only for sleep.  Thus the dining fly is my living room. 

Ed  

 Totally right. 

10:34 a.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

Say Jake, a lot of good advise so far, though I can’t determine if any of it is relevant for one important reason: You mention places and seasons, but do not provide details on the climates you expect. 

You’ll be in Asia; what season is the monsoon?  Will you be in snow? How 'bout sand storms?  Have you considered sun exposure?  Likewise where in South America, and when.  You do realize “Late Summer” in South America occurs in different months, depending on your latitude.  Also being in South Americat could be a rain forest, desert, or alpine setting.  Paint us a better picture of the weather you anticipate. 

Personally I try to sleep out under the stars whenever possible.  A bug net probably is advised, and for the really wet venues a dining tarp in addition to whatever sleep shelter you bring.  In fact I would be temped to bring the smallest tent that will stand up to what you anticipate, and augment it with a dining fly.  I find living out of a tent long term is too confining, and prefer using them only for sleep.  Thus the dining fly is my living room. 

Ed  

 This makes sense to me and, given the concern about theft, etc. of highend gear such as a Hille. tent, is very probably your most practical alternative. The one situation where I would prefer a tightly closed, highend tent to the but net and fly tarp would be in areas with large populations of poisonous serpents.

I am not used to snakes, since they tend to be small, rare, non-toxic and timid here in BC and tend to be more concerned about dangers in an environment with which I am not familiar than with those I am such as bears and avalanches. So, that is my major reason for prefering a tent.

I have some tipi-pyramid shelters and these are great in some respects and not as efficient in others. They can be a pain in the butt to setup on hard-frozen ground and require more attention during a severe snow storm such as those experienced here, in the Sierras in California and other such regions.

So, for me, I like selfstanding dome tents best, but, one shelter I would suggest checking out is the "BackCountry Shelter" by "Seek Outside" in Colorado. It impresses me and the people who design and build gear for this firm also impress me, "Google" their site.

1:06 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Whomeworry, You're singing to the choir. Feel better now? Ha

1:08 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Buddy of mine lived in a tepee near the Okanogan for years. Snow, sun, wind, snakes, bears, you name it. It's a miracle he lived to tell of it.

1:32 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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What you can do is buy a european style 4 season tent like a vaude or a marmot grid 2 and only use the fly sheet. You will save some weight and have a very decent and easy to set up dome shelter.

3:15 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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jad said:

Buddy of mine lived in a tepee near the Okanogan for years. Snow, sun, wind, snakes, bears, you name it. It's a miracle he lived to tell of it.

jad,

Are you endorsing a tepee design here for Jake's adventure needs, or is this a dig at another poster? or both? If it is a dig, whether or not you agree with the poster, or like his/her style in seeking to contribute positively, then I respectfully request that you leave that out of the post. I'm not saying that I have been the perfect poster - not by a long shot. I've had my moments as well. I do submit that your contributions on gear/topics are most welcomed.

If I recall, you referenced Hille's as the Gold Standard earlier, and I am sure that a Limited Release Petra Edition Hille would peak your interest (as it would Rick P's), but what would you suggest for a shelter in JakeJSim's situation?

3:22 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Bottom line, for other than serious mountaineering, I recommend a tepee style something with no floor. With experience and proper setup for the conditions, they are great. Who wants to lug around a heavy ass 4 season tent anyhoo? My mountaineering tent is a single wall Bibler I-Tent.

I said the Hillebergs are the gold standard for tough. Not that I wanted to haul one around. Petra has nothing to do with it. I just think she's hot.

3:34 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Nice. I hope to get a GoLite Shangri La 3 or similar someday for trips that include both of my kids. Modified Tepee style I guess you could say. Don't know if my young daughter would quickly adopt the floorless setup - too scared of bugs getting to her at night. Hopefully she grows out of it...

3:39 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Bug screen setups are readily available for pyramids, tarps and the like. In all my years tenting, bugs haven't been my problem. Snoring, farting buddies have though.

4:08 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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jad said:

Bug screen setups are readily available for pyramids, tarps and the like. In all my years tenting, bugs haven't been my problem. Snoring, farting buddies have though.

 +1. I only see advantages with a tipi style tent for all but the worst condition (high altitude mountaineering, polar expedition and the likes). A floor can be a pain in the ass specially in snow conditions.

besides farthing buddies you forget humans in general They are much more harmfull than bugs.

4:11 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Yeah, I would definitely by the SL3 nest to go with the fly. I have the SL2 with the nest, it's just not big enough for 3.

4:37 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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XterroBrando said:

Yeah, I would definitely by the SL3 nest to go with the fly. I have the SL2 with the nest, it's just not big enough for 3.

 Unfortunately it is discontinued (it's a shame). You have to hurry if you want to get one. There is still some european retailers that have some in stock but i would be surprise if it last.

But i'm sure you can use any pyramidal bug net or any bug net for no money and use it instead. It's really not an issue. For example :

http://www.seatosummit.com/products/display/89

5:03 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Jad's right on here.  Pyramids, Mids, modified mids work and work well.  Lightweight, strong and can take a beating wind.  Great for snowy conditions as well.

They are re-gaining popularity - Mountain Laurel Designs, Golite, Sierra Designs, Mountain Hardwear, etc.

6:13 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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I have an original Chouinard Pyramid, the first of the shelters of this type he offered and I bought it in 1987 and have used it quite a lot. It was and is, although rather "beat" now and in "retirement" a practical and sturdy shelter at just over 3 lbs. I prefer this type of shelter for any camping in the BC interior from April to Sept-Oct. and the best of these I think is the new "Seek Outside Back Country Shelter"....but, like Hilles, the original ID and other quality tents, it ain't "cheap".

When camping in snow, these work OK, but, not as well as a good dome tent, however, they have the advantage of much lower weight and that is a big deal to an old guy like me. I used to spend a lot of 4-5 day solo hunting trips in the interior where an 18-24" dump of heavy, wet snow overnight was commonplace and these pyramids do require frequent removal of the buildup so that they do not rip or collapse.

Since, we old doddering guys tend to need to get up a number of times per night, it is no big deal to bush the snow off with your foot or snowshoe from where it slides down  and accumulates and that solves the problem.

I would be a bit cautious about using one of the really light ones in snow country, but, a bug nest and pyramid is often a more comfortable rig than many dome tents and one that is both versatile and light.

I tend to agree with FG on this, I expect to see a LOT more development and product offers in this type of shelter in the near future.

6:52 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Dewey said:

Since, we old doddering guys tend to need to get up a number of times per night, 

 That is what the second Nalgene bottle is for...; )

7:07 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Don't forget the sharpie skull'n crossbones

7:15 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Dewey, Have you talked to the SeekOutside people? Their website is one of the worst I have ever seen for readability and I know it cost them a lot of money. I can't read half the text.

Their stuff looks like copies of what Titanium Goat has been selling for years-tipis with titanium stoves. Wonder what the story is. It is virtually the same product line at the same price points.

7:41 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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That site won't even show pics on my Mac but it may be my computer or...they are not even in business anymore.

Titanium Goat! Forgot about them.  One could also add Oware USA for pyramid / mid designs.

8:02 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Brumo said:

XterroBrando said:

Yeah, I would definitely by the SL3 nest to go with the fly. I have the SL2 with the nest, it's just not big enough for 3.

 Unfortunately it is discontinued (it's a shame). You have to hurry if you want to get one. There is still some european retailers that have some in stock but i would be surprise if it last.

But i'm sure you can use any pyramidal bug net or any bug net for no money and use it instead. It's really not an issue. For example :

http://www.seatosummit.com/products/display/89

 The SL3 is still sold directly on Golite's website. They've gone direct to consumer and lowered their prices dramatically. The only change is that you cannot get the fly and the nest separately. But who needs to when you can get both brand-new in a kit for $300 total?

8:12 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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XterroBrando said:

Brumo said:

XterroBrando said:

Yeah, I would definitely by the SL3 nest to go with the fly. I have the SL2 with the nest, it's just not big enough for 3.

 Unfortunately it is discontinued (it's a shame). You have to hurry if you want to get one. There is still some european retailers that have some in stock but i would be surprise if it last.

But i'm sure you can use any pyramidal bug net or any bug net for no money and use it instead. It's really not an issue. For example :

http://www.seatosummit.com/products/display/89

 The SL3 is still sold directly on Golite's website. They've gone direct to consumer and lowered their prices dramatically. The only change is that you cannot get the fly and the nest separately. But who needs to when you can get both brand-new in a kit for $300 total?

 Update - Golite sells direct in the US and Canada. International Direct to Consumer sales have not yet been finalized, so Brumo's comments about discontinuation currently apply internationally. Hopefully our overseas friends will again have access to their equipment directly.

8:53 p.m. on April 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Tom D said:

Dewey, Have you talked to the SeekOutside people? Their website is one of the worst I have ever seen for readability and I know it cost them a lot of money. I can't read half the text.

Their stuff looks like copies of what Titanium Goat has been selling for years-tipis with titanium stoves. Wonder what the story is. It is virtually the same product line at the same price points.

 I have spoken with Kevin, several times and find him an excellent guy in  all respects. He also has a gentleman, Ed Tyanich, who used to make the stoves for the Kifaru company and who is connected with him in some respects. Ed is,along with BillS, here, about the most knowledgeable guy on gear and it's uses that I have "met" on the 'net and his designs impress me as being practical and functional.

So, I am perhaps the ultra-moron where computers and all other such gizmos, gadgets and electronic devices are concerned; I would not know a "good" website, from a poor one. I do, however, find Kevin to be very helpful and friendly when a person phones seeking information....and, there is not any "hard sell" or claims about being the "best" and all of that.

As to TiGoat, I have spoken with them, once and the call was suddenly terminated, it was a cell and I did not call back or seek further info. on their products. I DO NOT consider Kevin's designs or products to be, in any respect, a copy or derivative of TiGoat's products, just sayin', here.

As far as I am aware, not always a perfect state of being at my advanced age, the first to offer these tipis was Patrick Smith, first of Mountainsmith and then he founded Kifaru. Patrick's products are now well known and very popular, particularly among backpack hunters and he deserves a lot of credit for his work in promoting these most useful shelters.

So, with an enjoyable search through the websites of SeekOutside,TiGoat and Kifaru, a person who wants to get into the tipi or pyramid camping with a light wood stove inside for warmth and some cooking, can find about anything one might want.

For longer stints in remote wilderness, if properly setup and maintained, a larger tipi from one of the above plus a stove, would be about as good as it gets and I like this much better than the stinky old canvas wall tents of the BCFS bush camps of my former occupation. Worth looking into, anyway.

BTW, I think that EdT,as he is known, was building Ti stoves and so was "Four Dogs" before TiGoat came on the scene. It is not so much about copies, but, more about continual evolution of ancient human designs.

2:00 a.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
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Hey Jake,

I apologize for my first post in your thread here, as it was wholly unhelpful considering your OP.

I feel you've started off on the right track by looking at Hilleberg tents. I own an Akto, and at 6'-1", 165lbs, I find it be comfortable with regards to interior space and headroom. Given that the Akto can be had with both a fabric and mesh inner tent, it may provide you with a bit more versatility over a wider range of temperatures than other options. Since a matching footprint can also be had, one can pitch the Akto in "fly only" mode very easily. It can be double-poled, for use in more severe winter/alpine conditions, without a very large increase in weight. When I think of a true 4-season tent, the Akto fits the bill as few other tents can.

9:19 a.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
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pillowthread said:

Hey Jake,

I apologize for my first post in your thread here, as it was wholly unhelpful considering your OP.

I feel you've started off on the right track by looking at Hilleberg tents. I own an Akto, and at 6'-1", 165lbs, I find it be comfortable with regards to interior space and headroom. Given that the Akto can be had with both a fabric and mesh inner tent, it may provide you with a bit more versatility over a wider range of temperatures than other options. Since a matching footprint can also be had, one can pitch the Akto in "fly only" mode very easily. It can be double-poled, for use in more severe winter/alpine conditions, without a very large increase in weight. When I think of a true 4-season tent, the Akto fits the bill as few other tents can.

 I'm jalous, I want one. Be ware Akto owner, if I saw one of those, I may campjack you

9:55 a.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
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Brumo said:

Personnally, I just purchased a shangri la 3 on sales on golite, with the floor. I wanted to use it exclusively during the canadian winter but i think it will soon become my main shelter.  It's lightweight, easy to set up and seems to shed winds very effectively. It may not be the best shelter in some situation but can easiky modified.

 I think an important point here is that it has a floor. Since the OP is looking for a tent that will work well in all kinds of conditions, apparently ranging from tropical jungle to alpine snowfield, I think I'd want something that would keep my gear dry and provide some separation from whatever the tent's pitched on.

If his sleeping bag gets wet, he can't just drive home and hang it over the shower curtain rod to dry - he has to sleep in it again the next night. And in spite of the weight advantage of the UL shelters, I would suggest that since the tent will be his permanent home (not a temporary one used for just a few days) the extra comfort provided by a proper tent with a waterproof bathtub floor would be an important factor.

10:05 a.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
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I tend to agree, however, for my tipi-type shelters, i have used "floors" made from tarps with considerable success. I have the groundsheets made by Integral Designs and the "double" model, inside my Kifaru tipi gives a clean area to sleep and keep the valuables I want beside me clean, dry and protected from ambient conditions.

It really is about choosing which particular features appeal most to you for the situations you experience and envision in the trips that you undertake. I, for example, would not have an "Akto" as a gift, yet, Vince loves them and knows what works for him while I prefer the added strength of the "Soulo" in the kind snow,etc., that I have experienced.

BTW, I see they just found the Alberta couple who were "lost"here in the Kootenays....nice to see, eh!

11:02 a.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
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peter1955 said:

Brumo said:

Personnally, I just purchased a shangri la 3 on sales on golite, with the floor. I wanted to use it exclusively during the canadian winter but i think it will soon become my main shelter.  It's lightweight, easy to set up and seems to shed winds very effectively. It may not be the best shelter in some situation but can easiky modified.

 I think an important point here is that it has a floor. Since the OP is looking for a tent that will work well in all kinds of conditions, apparently ranging from tropical jungle to alpine snowfield, I think I'd want something that would keep my gear dry and provide some separation from whatever the tent's pitched on.

If his sleeping bag gets wet, he can't just drive home and hang it over the shower curtain rod to dry - he has to sleep in it again the next night. And in spite of the weight advantage of the UL shelters, I would suggest that since the tent will be his permanent home (not a temporary one used for just a few days) the extra comfort provided by a proper tent with a waterproof bathtub floor would be an important factor.

 The SL3 is available with a full bug inner tent with high bathtub floor so no issue in getting wet.  The size of the SL3 is very nice for solo use and it's weight is commendable.

It IS a proper tent.

11:07 a.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
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pillowthread said:

Hey Jake,

I apologize for my first post in your thread here, as it was wholly unhelpful considering your OP.

I feel you've started off on the right track by looking at Hilleberg tents. I own an Akto, and at 6'-1", 165lbs, I find it be comfortable with regards to interior space and headroom. Given that the Akto can be had with both a fabric and mesh inner tent, it may provide you with a bit more versatility over a wider range of temperatures than other options. Since a matching footprint can also be had, one can pitch the Akto in "fly only" mode very easily. It can be double-poled, for use in more severe winter/alpine conditions, without a very large increase in weight. When I think of a true 4-season tent, the Akto fits the bill as few other tents can.

 I had an Akto and sold it.

The issues were as follows:

-too small for me 6'1" and 215lbs and I could not sit up in it, especially on a 2.5" pad.

-Poor snow loading capability.  The strutted ends will collapse in heavy, wet snow.

-significant condensation issues and limited ventilation.

However, there were some pluses:

-well made.

-excellent in windy, rainy conditions. Very stable.

-the inner is nicely long.

 

I think this will be a poor choice for the OP if he is living out of it for months at a time and if he needs snow loading capability.  Hilleberg has better choices for that.

11:33 a.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
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135 forum posts

peter1955 said:

Brumo said:

Personnally, I just purchased a shangri la 3 on sales on golite, with the floor. I wanted to use it exclusively during the canadian winter but i think it will soon become my main shelter.  It's lightweight, easy to set up and seems to shed winds very effectively. It may not be the best shelter in some situation but can easiky modified.

 I think an important point here is that it has a floor. Since the OP is looking for a tent that will work well in all kinds of conditions, apparently ranging from tropical jungle to alpine snowfield, I think I'd want something that would keep my gear dry and provide some separation from whatever the tent's pitched on.

If his sleeping bag gets wet, he can't just drive home and hang it over the shower curtain rod to dry - he has to sleep in it again the next night. And in spite of the weight advantage of the UL shelters, I would suggest that since the tent will be his permanent home (not a temporary one used for just a few days) the extra comfort provided by a proper tent with a waterproof bathtub floor would be an important factor.

The floor is not really an issue as Dewey mentionned. Golite use to sell a bathtub floor separately. Now the only sell the tent Fly sheet +nest.

The floor cannot be use alone anymore.

For me the bug net seems useless. It's not worth the price. There are very good bug nets much lighter and much cheaper.

11:37 a.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
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XterroBrando said:

 Update - Golite sells direct in the US and Canada. International Direct to Consumer sales have not yet been finalized, so Brumo's comments about discontinuation currently apply internationally. Hopefully our overseas friends will again have access to their equipment directly.

 They do but you have to contact them directly. But the bathtub floor are discontinued for everybody. It's a shame. 

It seems to me that golite is loosing his soul.

1:46 p.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
687 forum posts

Brumo said:

peter1955 said:

Brumo said:

Personnally, I just purchased a shangri la 3 on sales on golite, with the floor. I wanted to use it exclusively during the canadian winter but i think it will soon become my main shelter.  It's lightweight, easy to set up and seems to shed winds very effectively. It may not be the best shelter in some situation but can easiky modified.

 I think an important point here is that it has a floor. Since the OP is looking for a tent that will work well in all kinds of conditions, apparently ranging from tropical jungle to alpine snowfield, I think I'd want something that would keep my gear dry and provide some separation from whatever the tent's pitched on.

If his sleeping bag gets wet, he can't just drive home and hang it over the shower curtain rod to dry - he has to sleep in it again the next night. And in spite of the weight advantage of the UL shelters, I would suggest that since the tent will be his permanent home (not a temporary one used for just a few days) the extra comfort provided by a proper tent with a waterproof bathtub floor would be an important factor.

The floor is not really an issue as Dewey mentionned. Golite use to sell a bathtub floor separately. Now the only sell the tent Fly sheet +nest.

The floor cannot be use alone anymore.

For me the bug net seems useless. It's not worth the price. There are very good bug nets much lighter and much cheaper.

 One could make a floor pretty easily.

2:10 p.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
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FG said: "One could make a floor pretty easily."

Have and did. lighter weight than the OEM bathtub floor. When the weather's dry and the bugs are not an issue, I just use my home made Tyvek footprint. nice and easy. Plus, the factory bathtub floor suffers from some design issues (reflected in my review here on TS).

2:24 p.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
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Do you clip it in where the factory floor would go?

6:52 p.m. on April 18, 2012 (EDT)
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I don't. It is only a ground sheet and I connect and stake it out at the corners and then add the fly. It is nothing fancy. Just a 1/2' loop in each of 4 corners with a cord loop per.

3:07 p.m. on April 19, 2012 (EDT)
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sorry FG, I mean just a 1/2" webbing loop...

 

back to the OP - Jake, let us know how things turn out in terms of your choice! It'd be great to hear some long-term reviews of whatever you choose for your adventure.

3:34 p.m. on April 19, 2012 (EDT)
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XterroBrando said:

back to the OP - Jake, let us know how things turn out in terms of your choice! It'd be great to hear some long-term reviews of whatever you choose for your adventure.

 I would be interested as well. 

April 19, 2014
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