A good place to get hammock straps please!

12:28 p.m. on May 5, 2012 (EDT)
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Anyone know a good place to get hammock straps please

12:55 p.m. on May 5, 2012 (EDT)
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Simply put you want a polyester strap of 1in diameter, up to 2 in max. You want to use polyester because it doesnt stretch like nylon and other materials.

A common way is to go to Walmart, hardware store etc and buy ratcheting tie down/tow straps and take a hack saw and cut off the metal part that way you keep the sewn in loop that you need anyway.

Seat belt webbing is also a common choice, the best supplier for this that I know of is www.strapworks.com

Other options are whoopie slings which are the most popular choice it seems as of late.

Here are some hammock gear makers that also sell straps and whoopies.

http://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/acces.php

http://arrowheadequipment.webs.com/apps/webstore/products/category/270327?page=1

http://www.hammockgear.com/cart/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=20

 

 

 

8:38 a.m. on May 8, 2012 (EDT)
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Also try. Trek light. Good helpful service.

I generally use poly rope. Found some at local hardware store. $5 for 50'. It was hard to pass up plus it was rated up to 250lbs.

11:17 a.m. on May 8, 2012 (EDT)
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Thank you for your help

11:18 a.m. on May 8, 2012 (EDT)
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Thanks

1:08 p.m. on May 8, 2012 (EDT)
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250lbs is nowhere near enough to use for a hammock. You may luck out and it holds you for awhile, but a hammock puts hundreds of lbs of force on the suspension due to the angles they are hung at. It is strongly recommended to use something rated much higher.

Rope is lighter, but requires slightly more work to hang(you have to tie a couple knots) your hammock. Alot of people prefer a webbing strap with a cinch buckle for ease of use, though it weighs slightly more. It really boils down to personal preference though. If you do use rope make sure you use a tree hugger to prevent damage to the trees from the rope. The kinetic forces put on a hammock are really quite high, it is important to understand how a manufacturer comes up with their test rating for a given product. Typically it is just a straight forward break strength by pulling the rope until it breaks. Without getting into the math of it, typically assume that the rating is 50-70% of the rated breaking strength for use with a hammock.

I took a look at the Trek Light website, and it looks like they only sell two things, both of which are lights. Am I missing something here?

9:43 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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buy some 1" spectra webbing and make your own

12:27 p.m. on May 11, 2012 (EDT)
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Thanks Calahan, we will have the machines to do it at the shop, I will look into it.

1:07 p.m. on May 15, 2012 (EDT)
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tam1852 said:

Thanks Calahan, we will have the machines to do it at the shop, I will look into it.

 

2:39 p.m. on May 25, 2012 (EDT)
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talk to a machanic he might have an old seat belt and just sew up the end. maybe some junk cars. some are more flexible than others. Remember length . I take to small straps that came with my hhammock and a med i made . you can loop together to get correct length

11:08 p.m. on May 26, 2012 (EDT)
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It is strongly recommended not to use used rope/strapping. It only costs literally a few bucks to get a whole new suspension system. When suspension fails it can cause catastrophic gear failure, as well as potential personal injury. It's not worth it, buy new not used.

You sure don't want to suffer a bad fall and suffer a broken hip etc miles into the backcountry do you?

There is no way to really know the condition of used ropes/webbing, just because it 'looks' ok doesn't mean it is.

12:59 a.m. on May 27, 2012 (EDT)
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too right

12:27 p.m. on June 13, 2012 (EDT)
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I agree on the used gear is dangerous if its supporting your weight, but a back seat belt from a newer wrecked car should be fine. The breaking point of modern seat belts is so high that you would see lots of obvious damage before it would fail under hammock type strain. I know lots of people who use them as tow straps for four wheelers. They use them on the end of chains so they can attatch to the racks without metal on metal contact/damage. I have no idea what the breaking strength is, but I have watched those guys pull wheelers with them many times and never seen one break, their knots fail less than you would think too. I have had to extend my reach a couple of times. I couldnt find trees the proper distance apart. I used new parachute cord both times. It made me nervous so I piled as much soft stuff as I could find in the potential impact zone. I had to adjust after stretch but didnt break the 550lb cord either time. I weigh about 225lbs, I dont know what kind of force a hammock makes with my weight but it worked fine both times. I use a whoopie sling with 1inch webbing and a toggle. That is the best, lightest system I can find. Watch shug emery on utube. Try to get past the cornball cause he knows his stuff. Anyway thats my two cents.

12:51 a.m. on June 15, 2012 (EDT)
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hotdogman said:

I agree on the used gear is dangerous if its supporting your weight, but a back seat belt from a newer wrecked car should be fine. The breaking point of modern seat belts is so high that you would see lots of obvious damage before it would fail under hammock type strain. I know lots of people who use them as tow straps for four wheelers. They use them on the end of chains so they can attatch to the racks without metal on metal contact/damage. I have no idea what the breaking strength is, but I have watched those guys pull wheelers with them many times and never seen one break, their knots fail less than you would think too. I have had to extend my reach a couple of times. I couldnt find trees the proper distance apart. I used new parachute cord both times. It made me nervous so I piled as much soft stuff as I could find in the potential impact zone. I had to adjust after stretch but didnt break the 550lb cord either time. I weigh about 225lbs, I dont know what kind of force a hammock makes with my weight but it worked fine both times. I use a whoopie sling with 1inch webbing and a toggle. That is the best, lightest system I can find. Watch shug emery on utube. Try to get past the cornball cause he knows his stuff. Anyway thats my two cents.

 Interesting idea, seat belts are really strong.

11:20 a.m. on September 12, 2012 (EDT)
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I believe I may have a viable alternative using the 550 cord.  We make a toggle rope that seems to work extremely well as a suspension system for hammocks.  It is made with a braided 550.  We also came up with what we are branding the TSIB hitch (THE ship in a Bottle hitch) that is less harmful to trees.  It is up on you tube now as well as our web site The Ship in a Bottle.  I would be very interested in your feedback and an opportunity to answer questions. 

Please review the video on my web site or on You Tube with a "TSIB Hitch" search and let me know how I can help.  The TSIB hitch and toggle rope seem to be getting fairly good initial reviews in the hammock forum community.  It has a breaking strength in excess of 1000 pounds and is very easy to set up and tear down.  Use of the TSIB hitch, whether with any type rope or our toggle rope distributes the weight over a wider area than a rope and may obviate the need for accessories such as straps to hang a hammock. 

5:55 p.m. on September 12, 2012 (EDT)
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A good concept, and would definitely work.

However,

Why go through the trouble of braiding a bunch of 550 when you can just use two 1-2in webbing straps and two cinch buckles. Simpler, and weighs less than the same amount of 550 to accomplish the same goal.

If your not concerned about weight then it would not be a big deal, cost wise its probably about the same if you braid the paracord yourself. $29.95($35.90 with shipping) however for two 10ft sections(granted this is closer to 100ft in total of paracord) seems a bit pricey IMO for what you get.

 just assuming 10ftx3 cords x 2, plus a bit extra lost in the weaving process for somewhere near 100ft total

9:02 a.m. on September 13, 2012 (EDT)
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 I think either would work , but the question is, what you use it for and if like you said do you need that much rope for 2-300 lbs. But, I don't want to discourage and I think you do have something that could be used for some hammocks and for other things too.And I will check it out on YouTube right now. With our economy we need to be using our minds to get us out of this crazy mess!

9:15 a.m. on September 13, 2012 (EDT)
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Watched the YouTube video. This would help to save wear atear on trees, and looks very strong indeed.Good job! I believe there is a place or market for this , but it might not be in the light backpacking realm. But where strength is needed you got it!

  I appreciate people who design things and try and be inovative, keep it up it can create jobs! Look at the forum Backpack hammock tent in this site and let me know what you think also.Thanks!

9:19 a.m. on September 13, 2012 (EDT)
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On the funny side and maybe this would actually work too. You could use this and attach any kind of seat even an old car or van seat in the garage and hook it up and put it in your trees in your yard and it wouldn't kill the trees and you could leave it up.

11:12 a.m. on September 13, 2012 (EDT)
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Thank you for your feedback.  Our Toggle Ropes are made up using four 14 foot strands of the 550 to attain a 10 foot lengths.  Thus, a single toggle rope has approximately 56 feet of 550. The purpose for this design for the toggle rope (and our patent pending) is that the toggle can be passed in between the middle of the 4 strands at any point (or in the eye of the toggle rope) to secure it.  The TSIB hitch was designed not only for the toggle rope but for any suitable piece of rope to be used in a tree friendly way to to secure a hammock or load to a tree.  The fact that the toggle rope has a breaking strength of more than 1000 pounds is why it can be used for many other applications besides just hanging a hammock.  As to the toggle rope weight, a set of two toggle ropes weighs in at just under a pound and stuffs into a very small space.  The toggle ropes have been on tour with Sheri and Randy Propster of Backpacker Magazine Get Out More tour for a couple years now.  For those who do not have the skills or patience to make up the toggle ropes, we offer them as a set on our web site. 

11:28 a.m. on September 13, 2012 (EDT)
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Thank you.  I hope the TSIB hitch can be of use to someone who does not have a strap and can't afford accessories.  Any suitable piece of rope can be used to tie the hitch and if nothing else, minimize damage that might have been done by just tying a slim rope around a tree.  ...  Saw your post on the van seat in the yard....LOL...  neighbors here would love it for sure....Thanks, Jim.

10:00 p.m. on September 13, 2012 (EDT)
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I use the 1" webbing strap, taken from cargo straps with the metal buckle cut off and a small Biner put in. Goes on the tree in about a second and a half. A simple Marlin Spike Hitch with two wood toggles I whittled out of a Hornbeam branch from my yard go in easily at any height I want. On the other end I have New England 5mm poly cord forming a loop with a tautline hitch. It's exceptionally easy, couldn't be easier to adjust, very cheap and works really well. This is for my hammock chair, not a full hammock but no reason it couldn't be.

I'm not fond of paracord for this use as it does a lot of what it was intended to do, stretches like mad and then being Nylon, any knots put under those kind of loads basically fuse together. Also don't think paracord can be considered too tree friendly as it is kind of "grabby" on the bark where poly and flat webbing just slides.

That TSIB hitch is pretty cool though, I love knotwork so I'm sure that will be used in my future somewhere.

10:04 p.m. on September 13, 2012 (EDT)
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Hey Rambler,

I'm confused, what's a Whoopie? (I'm really opening myself up here, be kind now). Seems like it's another name for webbing straps?

5:14 p.m. on September 14, 2012 (EDT)
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I do not personally own any whoopie slings, nor have I ever actually seen them first hand. But many many people in the hammock community use them.

But, a whoopie sling set up consists of a small tree strap/tree hugger, and the whoopie sling which attachs to your hammock via continuous loop in the whoopie and a toggle. The information and graphics on the link below should help you visualize it a little better. The left side of the main picture is the most common way of attaching a whoopie.

Whoopie slings are made of Amsteel, which gives them superb strength for the weight. 7/64th Amsteel is 1600lbs load rated and a 6ft pair of whoopie slings only weighs 40 grams! (and a set of whoopies only costs $18)

http://www.whoopieslings.com/

 

11:22 p.m. on September 14, 2012 (EDT)
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TheRambler said:

I do not personally own any whoopie slings, nor have I ever actually seen them first hand. But many many people in the hammock community use them.

But, a whoopie sling set up consists of a small tree strap/tree hugger, and the whoopie sling which attachs to your hammock via continuous loop in the whoopie and a toggle. The information and graphics on the link below should help you visualize it a little better. The left side of the main picture is the most common way of attaching a whoopie.

Whoopie slings are made of Amsteel, which gives them superb strength for the weight. 7/64th Amsteel is 1600lbs load rated and a 6ft pair of whoopie slings only weighs 40 grams! (and a set of whoopies only costs $18)

http://www.whoopieslings.com/

 

 Ah, now I get it. May have to look into those, thanks for the link.

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