Water Bottles: Nalgene or SS (Kleen-Kanteen) -- Wha'cha use, and why ?

1:03 a.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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I have about a dozen-or-so water bottles.   Older and newer types of the Nalgenes ... and, a few Stainless Steel (SS) Kleen-Kanteen bottles.

Both types have their "pros" and "cons".

Durability, versatility, specific-application, "funkiness-factor" ( residual after-taste), and so-on.

Cost is not too much of a factor; being relatively similar (although one can spend $35 for some of the SS types).

Nalgene was "KING" at one time.   Until the dreaded Bisphenol A (a hardening agent in plastics) was found to be a possible carcinogen.   That is when the SS bottles got real traction in the marketplace.

Nalgene bottles have much more aftermarket products available (filters, etc).   The SS bottles are becoming more-and-more mainstream, now, however.

What is your preference ... and why?

                                 ~ r2 ~

6:33 a.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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I have nalgenes and SS bottles, though I rarely use either because they are way too heavy. I use gatoraide bottles most frequently, only cost like $1.50, and weight like 1.5oz. I only use a nalgene if I am bringing my miniworks filter. They are pretty darn tough for a 'disposable' bottle, i have yet to have one leak or have one break or otherwise fail. I am going on 2 years on one of them.

And the gatoraide bottle comes with a bonus drink inside!

7:37 a.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Haven't tried GatorAde bottles.   Will look to get one.  Do they have a loop on the lid ?

Kinda nessa.   Thanks for the tip.

                                    ~ r2 ~

10:08 a.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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I will use a Nalgene at time - classic model that is BPA free.  It weighs almost 1/2 the weight as a normal Nalgene @ 3.2oz but is far more rugged than a Gatorade bottle.  I don't like the stainless steel bottles because of weight but also because I always drop things and these are both expensive if lost and dent really easily.

10:46 a.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Nalgene 32oz Ultralite Wide Mouth - w/ ATB Closure

Light,

viewable,

maleable

storage

11:27 a.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Gatorade bottle.  Light, cheap, surprisingly tough, I can cut it up to make a funnel.  Hard to clean you say?  Why clean it when you can toss it when its dirty? 

With all the hype about UL, I don't see why more people don't use the bottle that came with your last sports drink/bottled water. 

Or is it something worse??

Is it the fact that the outdoor retail industry doesn't make $$ from me reusing water or gatorade bottles so they refuse to sponsor authors who do it in order to promote consumerism? 

Hmmm... Have to put on my tinfoil hat an think about this one. 

 

 

 

Jeff

11:47 a.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Hi Jeff.  Nothing wrong with a Gatorade bottle except for three things:

1.) it is disposable.  I like to buy something that will last the long term.  Better for the environment and I still only paid $3 for the Nalgene.

2.) Nalgene bottles work well with hot liquids.  Even boiled water for additional warmth under my quilt.  Can't do that with a Gatorade bottle.  The plastic leaches and it will likely soften sufficiently to spring a leak.

3.) I don't drink Gatorade....; )

12:36 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Family Guy said:

I will use a Nalgene at time - classic model that is BPA free.  It weighs almost 1/2 the weight as a normal Nalgene @ 3.2oz but is far more rugged than a Gatorade bottle.  I don't like the stainless steel bottles because of weight but also because I always drop things and these are both expensive if lost and dent really easily.

 The problem with many SS bottles, aside from weight, is that the steel used in their manufacture may come from recycled automotive engine blocks and thus be polluted with hydrocarbon residues. I will not heat one of these for that reason and this comes from a gear shop in whose owner I have total confidence.

I like Nalgenes for many reasons and usually use them, I have Sigg aluminum bottles and SS ones for some uses, but, Nalgenes work so well for me I just go with them. I detest Gatorade and sometimes will use juice bottles from "Ocean Spray" juices to carry water in the rare dry situation one finds here in BC.

I also used to drop things in many backpacking and horsepacking camps and oddly,when I stopped taking a flask of Lagavulin,Blavenie Double Wood or Glen Morangie with me, my "grasp" seemed to improve greatly.............

 

;)

12:51 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Like Rambler and Sage to Snow I use gatorade bottles.I do have two Nalgene bottles for winter and filtering water.I mostly use ther gatorade because they can be replaced easily when they get to funky on trips.

1:15 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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I wouldn't worry about hydrocarbon residues in stainless steel. In smelting it's heated to well over 10 times the boiling point of even the heaviest hydrocarbon.  In fact, temperatures this high destroy any organic toxin and many inorganic toxins.  Some worry about chromium or cadmium contamination from cheap stainless steels, but most reputable water bottle companies use "food grade" or "surgical grade" steels.

For short trips, I LOVE Gatoraid bottles.  However, I'm aware that there is likely as much to be concerned about reagarding phalate and antimony leeching from these bottles as there is BPA from Nalagene bottles.

For around town - I use stainless.  For backpacking trips of more than a week, I'll used 1 BPA free nalgene and 1 liter-sized playpus.

Great topic Robert!

1:15 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Waterbox Eastman Tritan:

http://www.waterboxco.com/?page_id=28

BPA free, and the square shape keeps me from having to chase them being it doesn't roll away quite as well as a Nalgene.

Plus if ya lose the lid contact them and they will send ya a new one free. I don't know where I am half the time so this is a nice lil bit of extra reassurance. :)

Only downside is they won't thread onto my Miniworks...

1:47 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Those really appeal to me and I am due to replace some 25+ year old water containers which are pretty thrashed. So, thanks,Rick,this tip is a big help to me as I will buy some of their polyester and some of their steel ones.

I sure like their coporate philosophy and hope to see more of such responsible business practices throughout society.

1:50 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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I've tried them all and keep returning to Nalgene for all the reasons mentioned.  I use Platapus occasionally, but typically only around camp.

1:51 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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if i use a bottle, nalgene or camelbak.  most of ours are tritan, a few are HDPE (cloudy softer plastic).  HDPE isn't great for winter.

3 season, i'm much more inclined to use reservoir/hose (camelbak, platypus, etc) and use the bottle only for purifying.  i find it easier to stay hydrated with the bladders. 

1:54 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Dewey said:

So, thanks,Rick,this tip is a big help to me as I will buy some of their polyester and some of their steel ones.

I sure like their coporate philosophy and hope to see more of such responsible business practices throughout society.

 Never a problem. 

2:09 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Dewey said:

 I also used to drop things in many backpacking and horsepacking camps and oddly,when I stopped taking a flask of Lagavulin,Blavenie Double Wood or Glen Morangie with me, my "grasp" seemed to improve greatly.............

 

;)

 

Classic!

5:46 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Reusing #1 (PETE) bottles? Not on my watch. Plastic just freaks me out anymore. Especially in the heat.

I like my Guyot designs 1 liter stainless steel bottle, with the standard screw top replaced with a CamelBak "sippy" lid. I often use a neoprene cozy to stabilize temperature and reduce condensation on the outer surface of the bottle.


bottle.png

I also have one with no stickers on, that I can melt snow or boil water in if needed.

5:53 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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widemouth #2 nalgene bottles.  I got a bunch of them free from my backpack company.  I'm not real fond of the idea of leeching and some of the things I've read about Nalgene's ethics (animal stuff if I remember correctly).  If I didn't already have them, I don't think I would buy any.  I like the idea of reusing water and drink containers, but I never buy water or drinks in such containers.  I've grabbed a few while at friend's homes and used them.  Nalgenes are pretty heavy, so I'm all for lightening the load with other bottles.  SS most appeals to me.  That's probably where I'd go next, even if the weight differential is a wash.

7:22 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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I use 3 liter camelbak bladders. I don't like water bottles. I do have a SS thermos with a "pop top" for tea in the winter months when I'm at work and to carry milk for over night trips.


HS4080SS_Enlargement.png



9:52 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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I've grown fond of my liver being just the way it is... functional. Took me a long time to get it back that way after nearly dying, so I don't ingest anything that comes out of plastics. As Seth said, there is a lot more to worry about than the BPA, which was really nice toxic stuff and great how the lights had to be thrown on the roaches before they stopped using it. (In case anyone wants to google it, it's spelled pthalate. I know Seth, first day with your new fingers... :) )

I use the GSI Glacier SS Dukjugs and love them. Couldn't care less about the extra 7 or 8 ounces. I'm a strong guy, I can handle it. Besides, I can throw my water bottle right on my stove to make tea/coffee or purify water. Lets see ya do that with your plastic bottles.

http://www.gsioutdoors.com/activities/pdp/1_l_glacier_stainless_dukjug/gourmet_backpacking/

They have a nice company appearance also.

"GSI Outdoors is a small, privately-held, family company.  We have no obligation to an anonymous group of shareholders, a corporate board or anyone but our customers, our reps and each other.  It is this freedom which so epitomizes the outdoors and grants us the flexibility to be more responsive to the needs of our customers who love the backcountry as much as we do.  "

9:54 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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GSI do have some great products

12:40 a.m. on May 12, 2012 (EDT)
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Hydro Flasks. The 40 oz version was the best fit for me. Stainless Steel. Stays cold or hot for 24 hours, doesn't condensate, and can't freeze due to its double wall design. The only downside is its weight. It weighs a lot more than my camelbak 32 oz water bottle.
hydro-flask-40-oz-wide-mouth-orange-zest

12:48 p.m. on May 12, 2012 (EDT)
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CamelBak eddy water bottle..especially good for bumpy car rides...

7:37 p.m. on May 12, 2012 (EDT)
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Raiders99999 said:

Hydro Flasks. The 40 oz version was the best fit for me. Stainless Steel. Stays cold or hot for 24 hours, doesn't condensate, and can't freeze due to its double wall design. The only downside is its weight. It weighs a lot more than my camelbak 32 oz water bottle.
hydro-flask-40-oz-wide-mouth-orange-zest

 These look pretty nice, though maybe a little superfluous. There's nothing going in my water bottles that is still going to be in there 12 hours later. Though maybe a benefit in extreme cold weather.

How much do they weight? Couldn't find it on their web site. Had a hard time getting past that price tag too.

10:10 p.m. on May 12, 2012 (EDT)
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Hydro Flask Specs

Check the bottom of the page for  the specs on their entire line of products.

The 40 oz. Hydro Flask that I have weighs 482g (17 oz).

The Nalgene 32 oz. wide mouth weighs 179g (6.31 oz) significantly less

The Kleen Kanteen also uses 18/8 stainless steel. The 40 oz (wide and classic) weighs 265g (9.375 oz)

My Camelbak 1L (34 oz) weighs about the same as the Nalgene.

5:04 p.m. on May 23, 2012 (EDT)
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There are sooo many great custom water bottles to choose from, but I prefer an aluminum or stainless steel bottle.  They keep my water colder longer and don't contain harmful BPA!  Of course everyone has his/her own taste, though :).

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