"100 lbs. of lightweight gear"

12:34 a.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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On this forum most of us could likely completely outfit at least three people with the gear we own - that "110 lbs. of lightweight gear" we have accumulated.

Sooo... maybe we should:

1. keep it for emergencies like natural disasters of puting up in-laws outside the house (an unnatural "disaster").

2. loan some to someone you coralled into backpacking for the first time

3. sell it -SELL GEAR?!!- (but use the cash to buy NEW gear) YEA!

4. donate at least the "worst" of it

Especially those of us who are getting closer to that big "Departure Gate" in the sky need to re-think keeping a lot of unused gear around.

 

10:04 a.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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On my recent trek, we gave most of the gear away at the end. It went to the sherpas and their families and friends. Most of teh trekkers were not avid hikers, but some were. I left quite a bit of my stuff. Boots, coats, sox, hats, gloves, gaiters. But I kept my sleeping bag. I couldn't part with it for some reason.

10:12 a.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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I must have at least half-a-dozen backpacks of various sizes and shapes, especially in the small 'daypack' range. My excuse for keeping them is that I might want to lend them to someone someday.

But, seriously, GoG! Your boots!!!????

10:27 a.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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i keep a few spares of some things for various reasons, usually because a family member might use them or b/c i can lend them out without risking my primary gear getting trashed.  my oldest pair of trail runners routinely becomes my shoes for mowing the lawn.

so, i have an old tent and stove that i'm happy to lend to friends, they work fine & i'm not so concerned about them getting trashed.

but for the most part, i try to sell gear on craigslist when i upgrade, if possible.  i have successfully sold some jackets, some backpacks, a couple of folding knives, and a couple of bicycles that way. 

10:48 a.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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I typically use my extra gear as loaner stuff for people who want to accompany me on one of my journeys. I am actually in the process of cooordinating with a member here for a LHHT thru hike in August.

I will do just about anything to get someone out there. If loaning the gear makes the difference then I am all for it.

I love to take people out on the trail. Kinda hard to get someone to join me for a week long trip in late winter. Hmmmmmm.....

Anywho, I have all kinds of spare gear.

I have never sold anything online. I just listed a pair of crampons on here for grabs. Should be an easy sell being it is summer. ;)

I have also given gear away. I not too long ago gave away an Aether 70 because I went to a larger pack(Big Blue.)

11:26 a.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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peter1955 said:

But, seriously, GoG! Your boots!!!????

 YES MY BOOTS! I had purchased two pair prior to the trip. I also have a leather version of the boot. I brought along the stock insoles in case my Smart Feet failed. Many of the local folks on the trail are in flip flops or tennis shoes. I removed my SmartFeet and replaced the stock insole and they were like new. So I left them and have two perfectly good pair to wear here at home.

11:57 a.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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It is customary when going trekking or climbing in a Third World Country to donate your gear to the local porters and guides, especially in countries like Tanzania and Kenya in Africa (and elsewhere) where you are required to use the local guides. Their income is enough for local cost of living, but not for getting the boots and clothing needed for high altitude, cold, long treks. As Karen commented, I have seen many porters wearing ragged tennis shoes and sandals, as well as thin shirts and pants. If you are doing technical climbs where you are using double plastic boots, of course, this does the porters up to base camp no good. But your good leather (or even, yuk!!, goretex) boots can serve them very well. OTOH, I asked my required porters about whether they had quality boots (one of them took size 14 boots, much larger than I wear), and was told they often save the good boots for their personal hiking and just use the tennies.

300winmag made the offensive comment:

Especially those of us who are getting closer to that big "Departure Gate" in the sky need to re-think keeping a lot of unused gear around.

I don't know about you, young punk, but I estimate I have another 3 decades of climbing and hiking to add on to my current 7 decades spent in the outdoors. I may be forced by the government to carry my Official Elderly cards (SS and Golden Age passports), plus take an MRD from my retirement account, but the terms like "old", "elderly", "senior citizen", and such are insulting and uncalled for. You are only as old as you feel, plus life picks up when you are over the hill. However, never turn down a Senior Discount (unless it is that junk meal at Denny's that is offered as a "Senior Meal").

Me starting a career of wilderness wandering at 6 months with my mother:


hors10mo.gif

A recent photo of me at the summit of Mt Vinson in Antarctica:


IMG_0196.jpg

Ok, for a number of people, their hike up Kilimanjaro (which is a pretty easy hike by most of the trails) or their climb of some Nepalese peak is their "Trip of a Lifetime", and never again do anything of the sort. In that case, yes, donate the -40 degree sleeping bag, the double plastic boots, and the expedition-level down parka and pants. But when the climbing and hiking is in your blood as it is in mine (and my spouse, Barbara's), you need those 12 tents and 6 sleeping bags each, and have to buy new boots every 3 or 4 years (sometimes sooner).

(oh, by the way, in case you have forgotten, do not take anything the Old GreyBearded One says or writes completely seriously. {8=>D )


11:58 a.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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giftogab said:

peter1955 said:

But, seriously, GoG! Your boots!!!????

 LOL! You'll pardon my overreaction, but I routinely spend so much time searching for the perfect pair of boots that I think I develop quite a personal relationship with them. I certainly put more effort into those relationships than I've ever done finding a new girlfriend.

12:20 p.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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peter1955 said:

giftogab said:

peter1955 said:

But, seriously, GoG! Your boots!!!????

 LOL! You'll pardon my overreaction, but I routinely spend so much time searching for the perfect pair of boots that I think I develop quite a personal relationship with them. I certainly put more effort into those relationships than I've ever done finding a new girlfriend.

 HA! I know what you mean. But I look at the new owner's feet as sort of the SISTERWIVES of my boots! (Local joke cuz there is polygamy here in Nevada and in Arizona/Utah border area.)

3:34 p.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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Bill S said:

I don't know about you, young punk...

One of the advantages of getting old is the liberty of coping an attitude, especially when you can back it up.  We all love Clint Eastwood, especially in his later roles.  I am still full of piss and vinegar - literally more so than the days of yore.  While you can still climb, Bill, I think a better description of my ascents is geezering up the hill.  But at least I can reach most anywhere I feel, which nowadays principally is the toilet and medicine cabinet, but does count a peak now and then. 
----------------

As for foreign trekking, I have climbed in Canada and Peru.  Our climbs in Canada did not involve third parties, but we did buy our fuel in grossly over portioned volumes and purposely left the surplus with the locals upon departure.  On our first trip to Peru we simply purchased clothes and shoes for our “guide” and his family, and food for his family for each day he was away with us out on excursion.  This gratis was part of his tip.  On the second trip someone inherited most of our gear – we abandoned it on a forced evacuation.  We still tipped as just described.  We also brought several cases of used sunglasses and eye glasses from the states and left them with a NGO that assisted the local villages, as I was made aware on my first trip of the eye health issue these people endure, living at high altitude.
---------------
I retain some of my gear spares, but mostly I pass them on, provided each is still trail worthy.  I’ll loan gear to others, except my sleeping bags, as most folks relax their personal hygiene practices in the backcountry, and I don’t want my clean bag returned with a rime of funk and mung.  
Ed

5:07 p.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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OGBO: I hope to be out ther as long as these piano les will carry me! But I will buy the new gear for the next adventure. I find it part of the fun!

6:44 p.m. on June 12, 2012 (EDT)
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GEEZERS UNITE!

Hee, hee, "...offensive comment..."

Well Bill I'm 69 and hope to be still backpacking at 79. But of course by then there will be gear so light our packs will only be around 20 lbs for 7 days including food and 2 liters of water. By then our "UL" standard will be the new "Regular" and our "SUL" will be the new "UL" standard. Got that? (Take notes Bill.)

So maybe we could shoot for backpacking at 89??

I'm very lucky to have only a few aches and no high blood pressure, no heart or lung problems and a liver in "generally" good shape (because I drink only micro brew beer).  :O)

But then I XC ski raced for years and bike raced in the summers. That gave me a good base to keep on truckin'.  I'm currently an alpine ski patroller at our Las Vegas resort with a base lodge at 8,500 ft. so I get my share of "altitude" exercise.

On July 4th I'll begin backpacking the 37 mile Ruby Crest trail in Nevada's northern Ruby Mountains. Yeah, I'll be with a bunch of young "Whippersnappers" so I have been training for it. I'll likely sneak some of my gear on their packs. Youth and innocence are no match for old age and treachery. heh,heh

Now if I can just pare down my pack weight a bit more. My body weight is dropping and should be quite good by September at 175 lbs. for my 5' 10" frame.

 

And then there are my "Magic Elixr Tablets" known as "NO2 Red", they are mainly L-ARginine time-release in tablets. I get 'em at GNC and they do make a difference when I'm at altitude B/C the L-Arginine amino acid releases Nitric Oxide over 8 hours. The capillaries in my muscles and in my lungs' alveoli (in particular) expand and carry more blood and thus more O2.  Hey, been using them since 2002 and they work. As does CytoMax sport drink to reduce the buildup of lactic acid in my muscles.
Yep, old and teacherous...

1:23 a.m. on June 13, 2012 (EDT)
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We have to face it, most of us are better at collecting gear than using it.  Shameful but true.

Thanks to the internet we can collect gear 365 days a year.  Yet even if we get out and hike every weekend we are hard pressed to use it more than 100 days a year.  And, be truthful now, most of us can count the total days per year we use our gear and still have a few fingers or toes leftover.

So what to do with our 100 lbs of lightweight gear?  Options!  We can carry a different 10-12 lbs of gear each and every time we go out.  So don't fret.  And don't stop collecting. Let's instead put our extra mindshare to work on finding more excuses to get out there.  This years goal:  have to use at least one piece of gear twice this year.

Jesting of course, but close to the mark, no?

9:33 a.m. on June 13, 2012 (EDT)
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steve t said:

...  And, be truthful now, most of us can count the total days per year we use our gear and still have a few fingers or toes leftover.

Really? The 100 days per year sounds more like it. For my certifications, I have to track the hours (not days), but if I break it down, I'm well over that mark.

So if you're writing a gear review here, you base it on less than twenty days usage?

9:38 a.m. on June 13, 2012 (EDT)
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steve t said:

And, be truthful now, most of us can count the total days per year we use our gear and still have a few fingers or toes leftover.

I have personally set a mark for myself to get in 1000(or more)miles a year. I have been really good with this over the previous years but have taken a hit as of late due to an injury. I am pretty much healed up so I suppose I now have a bit of work to do to keep the consistency up. :)

 

12:44 p.m. on June 13, 2012 (EDT)
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Well. I am the old lady around here (I think) and I am 51. I was sedentary for a good 15 years and came out of hybernation a few years ago, slowly increasing my activites to include some big time (for me ) hiking over the last couple of years. That meant GEAR GEAR GEAR. I have a lot less now that I gave a bunch away. But I am hoping to be mocing through the mountains for a few decades!

1:58 p.m. on June 13, 2012 (EDT)
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NF.jpg

2:49 p.m. on June 13, 2012 (EDT)
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ROTFLMAO!

3:16 p.m. on June 13, 2012 (EDT)
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Hehe :)

I find myself apologetic over owning a NF jacket, sometimes feeling the need to explain I got used for a really good deal, and with a primaloft standalone liner!

I have more gear than i need for myself, but not much, and I have it so that I can take my younger brothers and make sure they have what is needed. I also want to make sure I have everything for the rare occasions when I can convince my sweet wife out for an easy trip. 

As far as days and miles per year, I really don't keep track, but I suppose I could tally up an estimate for the 2011 calendar year of about 24-28 days on trail, covering 200+ miles. And that's not counting short hikes in the National Forest near my house. This year has been a little light, but I've still put in 8 backcountry days and 50+ miles. 

6:49 p.m. on June 13, 2012 (EDT)
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300winmag said:

I'm very lucky .. .."generally" good shape ...

But then I XC ski raced for years and bike raced in the summers. That gave me a good base to keep on truckin'... 

Yes you are lucky to have won the genetic lottery, as well as not experience a life altering mishap.

Were are close in age.  The bumps I have experienced and my bad genes are quickly racking up their accumulated affects on my aging body.  Despite living an active, mostly clean and healthy eating life, I have lost over 30% of my lung capacity to a genetic immune system disorder.  And a recent hard fall resulted in a heart attack, which triggered a sudden onset of diabetes.  Other issues too but you get the picture.  I still venture out, but at much greater effort.  I am only now getting back into vigorous activities after the coronary event this spring.  I do not know my new limits - the doc was impressed with my treadmill test results -  but I do know they are not what they were prior to the event. 

The moral: We all eventually go down with the ship; sip the good stuff while it is still afloat.

Ed

8:36 p.m. on June 13, 2012 (EDT)
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The thing is, as we get older and our limits close in on us, if we can think back over all we did and enjoy the memories, we have succeeded in filling our days. Nit just fun, but accomplishment. That is why I am so excited that my trek to Nepal resulted in a fund raising project to get electricity brought in to the part of the village my sherpa lives in and 6 families have no power there. It is a big project but I raised the money in about 3 weeks and am now moving forward on it. So the dream of Everest Base Camp is resulting in me and 36 others providing and answer to these families dreams. I can live with that!

10:19 a.m. on June 14, 2012 (EDT)
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Well, GoG, you've impressed me now, even more than with your trek.

7:05 p.m. on June 14, 2012 (EDT)
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300winmag said:

Well Bill I'm 69 and hope to be still backpacking at 79. But of course by then there will be gear so light our packs will only be around 20 lbs for 7 days including food and 2 liters of water. By then our "UL" standard will be the new "Regular" and our "SUL" will be the new "UL" standard.

 You are still with the "young punks" crowd.

I keep getting a good laugh out of the UL claims. I still have the "users manual" that Dick Kelty gave everyone who bought one of his packs (I still have the Backpacker model I bought from him in his garage in Glendale in 1960). He listed the base gear list, which added up to a bit less than 15 pounds, including pack, sleeping bag, shelter, and everything needed for cooking, with the food to be added at about 2 pounds/day/person. And that is what we hit every time without the "modern, Ultra Light", super expensive gear. That looks like about 24 pounds for a week, including the food. Doesn't look like a lot of progress has been made (except for the progressively higher prices).

...

So maybe we could shoot for backpacking at 89??

 That's Fred Beckey's age, and he is still climbing hard stuff on rock and ice. I'm shooting for 108 and still climbing!

 ....

On July 4th I'll begin backpacking the 37 mile Ruby Crest trail in Nevada's northern Ruby Mountains.

 One of the most beautiful places in the world, and a surprising discovery in the middle of the Nevada desert for those who haven't been there and just stumble upon it. Very few besides the locals know about it (and let's keep it that way - There are places in the Rubies where I have spent a week without seeing anybody else). Great skiing in midwinter (no, I don't take the whirlybird ride with those folks in Lemoille). But let's keep the rock climbing there a secret, as well as the stuff around Secret Pass.

 

12:21 a.m. on June 15, 2012 (EDT)
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Ed,

This thread is turning into a geezer thread but that's OK with me. I hear ya about hereditary ailments and the "banana peels" of life Ed.

When folks know my age they comment on how young I look. My comment is, "Ya gotta pick the right parents." I know it ain't all the good micro-brew beer I drink, it's them thar genes.

I've lost the hearing in my right ear from Menier's syndrome and had a few broken bones and cheated death in a few close calls so I'm very aware of my mortality. That's why I spoil my grandchildren, kiss my wife when leaving and returning to the house, drink that good beer and hike and ski those beautiful trails. It's all borrowed time. Remember the Mayan calendar thingy...

Jeez oh Man! (as Radar O'Riley used to say) I'm getting sloppy already. Time to buy more gear and cheer myself up. RETAIL THERAPY!

 

12:33 a.m. on June 15, 2012 (EDT)
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Thanks for sharing these stories guys. You are inspiration for all of us who havent achieved your level of experience.

1:02 a.m. on June 16, 2012 (EDT)
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peter1955 said:

steve t said:

...  And, be truthful now, most of us can count the total days per year we use our gear and still have a few fingers or toes leftover.

Really? The 100 days per year sounds more like it. For my certifications, I have to track the hours (not days), but if I break it down, I'm well over that mark.

So if you're writing a gear review here, you base it on less than twenty days usage?

I would love to get out 100 days per year.  I manage maybe 400 miles and a months worth of days.  Most of this being weekends.  I manage one trek of ~2 weeks duration each year.

And reviews, please take it easy on me.  With my hiking schedule I need 3-4 years with a piece of gear before it had and I had enough experience with it to write a meaningful review.  My one exception is the review I wrote of my Scarpa Boots which unbelievably fit perfectly out of the box and I could hike miles in immediately.

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