Time to recharge the boots

7:27 a.m. on November 12, 2012 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,544 reviewer rep
1,322 forum posts

Just re-treated them and replaced the laces.....


image.jpg

7:31 a.m. on November 12, 2012 (EST)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Good time of year to do it. ;)

I need to dust the ol Scarpas off. 

10:03 a.m. on November 12, 2012 (EST)
1,367 reviewer rep
1,339 forum posts

I cleaned and re-waxed mine a week ago. I probably won't be using them again until spring, though.

Have to wear my -40° Baffins from now on.

Sigh.

11:36 a.m. on November 12, 2012 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,544 reviewer rep
1,322 forum posts

2 questions about the cold weather boots:

 

-do you ever need crampons where you are, and if so, how do you use them with a soft-soled boot? i have never been able to get crampons to stay on boots like that (sorel, baffin, whatever).

-how do you keep your feet from getting drenched & maybe trench-footed on a trip with those boots?

where I am, i usually end up with plastic double boots due to the not-infrequent need for crampons in the winter.  plenty warm but fairly unforgiving.  if I'm going somewhere i won't likely need the spikes underfoot, i'll use boots more like what you're describing, or maybe the boots pictured above inside insulated overboots if i'm probably going to be on snowshoes most of the time.

 

 

1:16 p.m. on November 12, 2012 (EST)
255 reviewer rep
1,469 forum posts

lookin gooood

1:22 p.m. on November 12, 2012 (EST)
TRAILSPACE STAFF
468 reviewer rep
1,084 forum posts

lead - what do you use to waterproof them? 

2:42 p.m. on November 12, 2012 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,544 reviewer rep
1,322 forum posts

they are limmer standard boots, and i use their boot grease.  These are chrome-tanned, full grain leather boots, and i'm sure the waterproofing is made with that kind of leather in mind. 

http://www.limmerbootgrease.com/product_use.html

i have never used this stuff on my other (non-limmer) boots.  for my old LL Bean maine hunting shoes, i use sno-seal or something i can find easier over the counter. 

4:55 p.m. on November 12, 2012 (EST)
12 reviewer rep
843 forum posts

my boots are goretex lined, should I be treating them?

6:32 p.m. on November 12, 2012 (EST)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Trailjester said:

my boots are goretex lined, should I be treating them?

Short answer yes. But at the same time you want to use a product that will not inhibit the breathability characteristics of the footwear. 

Nikwax would be the way to go. 

Are your boots leather, synthetic, or a combination of the 2?

This will have great bearing on what product would be right for your application.

1:59 p.m. on November 13, 2012 (EST)
1,367 reviewer rep
1,339 forum posts

leadbelly2550 said:

-do you ever need crampons where you are, and if so, how do you use them with a soft-soled boot? i have never been able to get crampons to stay on boots like that (sorel, baffin, whatever).

I use Microspikes when I can, and they hold well on the soft boots. The only problem I've found is that on ice you can feel the top of the spikes through the boot sole.That's my 'go-to' setup for ice walks and icy trails.

For a more aggressive crampon, I use Camp Stalkers, a flexible 12 pt crampon, and they stay on pretty well if I wear my regular hiking boots. 

With a soft boot, you have to keep checking the straps because they can loosen off, and some styles of boot are just too wide to fit into the bindings.

-how do you keep your feet from getting drenched & maybe trench-footed on a trip with those boots?

Good question! The trick with any boot that has a removable liner is to dry them out completely at the end of every day. I know that with -100° Sorel boots, you pull the liners out every night and  swap in a fresh, dry pair every morning. I always buy a second set of liners so one pair has at least 24 hrs to dry before its next rotation. Some boots also come with a waffle liner underneath the insole that lets sweat move away from the foot.

where I am, i usually end up with plastic double boots due to the not-infrequent need for crampons in the winter.  plenty warm but fairly unforgiving.  if I'm going somewhere i won't likely need the spikes underfoot, i'll use boots more like what you're describing, or maybe the boots pictured above inside insulated overboots if i'm probably going to be on snowshoes most of the time.

Really, I'd have to say that for anything more technical than a glacier walk, proper mountaineering boots that are built to take a rigid crampon are probably your best bet.

One word of caution - most mountaineering boots are not as warm as a pac boot meant for wearing in very cold climates. I like the idea of an overboot - that would definitely help. I also carry chemical toes warmers, and last year I bought a pair of rechargeable heated insoles.

2:57 p.m. on November 13, 2012 (EST)
12 reviewer rep
843 forum posts

rick-

my boots are nubuck leather - not sure what type of tanning used but they're not oil tanned. should I also be using some kind of cleaning product? what would you recommend?

3:41 p.m. on November 13, 2012 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,544 reviewer rep
1,322 forum posts

thanks, Peter.  the scarpa invernos i use have high altitude liners.  at -30f, the coldest i have seen with them, my toes were peachy. 

with my sorels, i didn't think to get spare felt liners.  i crumple newspaper and stuff the liners, & sleep with them in the foot of my bag.  sometimes it works, other times, still a little damp.  good idea to bring spares.

4:50 p.m. on November 13, 2012 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
1,247 reviewer rep
624 forum posts

Those scarpa infernos are like walking with bricks on! I've never hiked in them, only used them for ice climbing, I don't know how you do that.. Even on short approaches they get uncomfortable.

6:14 p.m. on November 13, 2012 (EST)
1,367 reviewer rep
1,339 forum posts

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Nikwax would be the way to go. 

I use a Nikwax aqueous wax on my leather boots. It conditions and waterproofs and still lets the leather breathe.

You rinse the boots off in the kitchen sink (don't tell my wife!) and when they're nice and wet, you sponge on a few coats. The water carries the wax into the leather in areas where it's most needed.

Then you let them dry for a few days and wipe off any excess. Repeat every few months or as needed.

8:21 p.m. on November 13, 2012 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,544 reviewer rep
1,322 forum posts

those limmer boots have a stiff but not totally inflexible midsole.  i can wear them with overboots and strap crampons down to really cold temperatures.  back when insulated supergaiters were easy to find, i could wear leather boots in really cold weather if i used a piece of felt or foam as an insole.  (in case you haven't seen them, a supergaiter is basically an overboot that leaves the sole of a boot exposed.  they usually grab your boots via a rubber rand or stout elastic that keeps the gaiter secured around where the boot material meets the sole, where the welt is on a full leather boot.  i had a pair but lost them or lent them & never got them back years ago.   problem is, if it's a dry, less snowy winter, you can't really use overboots, and leather boots with a pair of wool socks won't cut it in sub-zero weather, at least for me.  for what it's worth, 40 below is probably the best place to find warm overboots today.  I continue to nurse my mountain hardwear absolute zero overboots along, crampon gashes closed with duct tape.  

mountaineering boots are definitely best with crampons or snowshoes, or places where you can kick steps in snow.  not ideal for walking on dry trails, and a little tricky to use them with overboots; the step-in crampons that work so well with plastic boots aren't quite as secure with overboots.  i'm used to walking in them, but when i'm not in crampons, i lace them pretty loose to avoid mangling my shins.  thing is, it's not uncommon to run into temperatures in the minus 10 or lower range in the mountains in the northeast & upstate NY, and there is usually enough snow to warrant crampons on most trails in the winter.  i'm willing to trade the clunky walking for keeping all my toes.  

have to admit, though, there are times when i would love to wear softer, more comfortable boots paired with kahtoola microspikes (which i don't own, unfortunately).  will have to try that out some time.  

8:37 p.m. on November 13, 2012 (EST)
1,367 reviewer rep
1,339 forum posts

If you look at the size of the lugs on boots like Baffins or Sorels, I think you'll find that for walking in snow you don't need anything more in the way of traction. They also work well for snowshoeing - because I tend to go slower and at a lower intensity, I find I need the extra insulation.

However, carrying a pair of Microskpikes is a lightweight option for places where you hit an icy slope, or somewhere else where you want to really get a grip on a slippery surface.

I understand YakTrax has just come out with a Microspikes knockoff called the XTR. I'd like to try those sometime.

I don't see using mountaineering boots for snowshoeing, just because they're so rigid and don't let your ankle flex normally. The optimal gait for snowshoeing is as close to a natural walk as possible. I have to agree with Jake on this one.

12:28 p.m. on November 14, 2012 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
1,349 reviewer rep
261 forum posts

I wanted boots that could be re-soled, so I went with Danner Light Hikers 2.  I also went with their silicone boot grease. I have been quite happy with their water-proofing.  I love my boots, but they are a bit heavy for big trips, but I LOVE Them for snowshoeing. The Danner brand has been very effective.  I have never wetted out the leather in hiking in the wet or snow.

1:59 p.m. on November 14, 2012 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,544 reviewer rep
1,322 forum posts

this has strayed somewhat from the original topic, but in trips where you need mountaineering boots and crampons at times, but may also need snowshoes, depending on conditions, do people bring 2 pair of boots? i pretty routinely encounter mixed conditions like this and generally elect to bring just one pair of boots.  that usually means mountaineering boots because i have not had good luck using crampons with softer-soled boots.  

i agree that mountaineering boots are less than ideal with snowshoes, but they tend to be my choice if i may need them and only bring 1 pair of boots. 

2:59 p.m. on November 14, 2012 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,083 forum posts

Beautiful boot.  I have the same project on my list of things to do.  I think I am going to try a Nikwax product instead of snow seal to see what I prefer.

3:56 p.m. on November 14, 2012 (EST)
12 reviewer rep
843 forum posts

I have snow seal but have been hesitant to use it on my gore tex lined boots...want them to breathe, and I think the sno seal does too good a job of sealing them.

5:00 p.m. on November 14, 2012 (EST)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
1,247 reviewer rep
624 forum posts

I agree with you that mountaineering boots are the way to go leadbelly. I would lean more towards something like the la sportive trango or an equivilant though. Still has the stiff sole, just a little bit more flexible upper.

5:05 p.m. on November 14, 2012 (EST)
1,631 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Trailjester said:

rick-

my boots are nubuck leather - not sure what type of tanning used but they're not oil tanned. should I also be using some kind of cleaning product? what would you recommend?

Sorry about the late response(it has been a hectic week.)

I would personally use Nikwax Nubuck & Suede proof for your boots. I will work well with gtx liners.

No goretex in my footwear(except for my Lowa Argon GTXs) so I typically use Obenhauf's on my fgl Scarpas.

062.jpg

 

5:30 p.m. on November 19, 2012 (EST)
12 reviewer rep
843 forum posts

thanks for the info. will get some and give my boots the once over.

November 28, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Help me ID my own boot type... Newer: Ceramic knife
All forums: Older: Sir Inch-a-lot Wins NEMO Astro Air Pad and Disco Pad Pump Newer: Snowshoes, I'm curious.