Fox River socks #2459 for heavy sweating?

9:09 p.m. on May 17, 2007 (EDT)
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Trying to find a really good sock for my day hiking trips. Live in the desert where it's very hot and very dry. Although there's no humidity, my feet still sweat a lot. I wrote to Fox River and asked them and they suggested:

"Socks made with our WICK DRY HEALTH SYSTEM will help keep your feet dry and comfortable. In particular, I would suggest the following styles for hiking in hot weather:
Style #2458 WICK DRY OFF ROAD CREW
Style #2459 WICK DRY OFF ROAD QTR."

Would you agree with their suggestion, or is there a better sock out there to keep my feet as dry as possible for as long as possible?

Thanks!

11:28 p.m. on May 17, 2007 (EDT)
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Boots are completely over-rated for backpacking and especially day-hiking. Try the various low-cut shoes with moderately stiff soles. I currently like Garmont. The genre is in most circumstances better, and certainly cooler, than any boot. Last summer and autumn, I did fair amount of hiking (lots of fishing) in sandals, sometimes with neoprene sox for warmth....David Brower in the 50s recommended Sierra backpacking with canvas-topped sneakers. I took this advise without complaint in 70s in Northern New Mexico. Running shoes were preferred "approach shoe" in the 80s. Things have improved slightly, but boots remain overkill unless you've got an extremely heavy pack or going on much off-trail.

3:51 a.m. on May 18, 2007 (EDT)
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Thanks for the reply but I'm not sure what it had to do with my question? I didn't ask anything about boots, perhaps it's past your bedtime ;-)

2:03 p.m. on May 18, 2007 (EDT)
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You might try anti perspirant...

Dr. Scholls used to sell it, but, they've apparently discontinued it.

I use prescription strength for some stuff (long trips).

A friend claims that Secret works great. Just rubs it on his feet. Seems to keep the smell down too.

I'll use Arid XX-tra dry spray on too. Works pretty well.

Anything with an antiperspirant rather than just deodorant.

Do have to be careful with overuse, as, too dry and your feet might crack. Painful.

Cheers,

-Brian in SLC

6:16 p.m. on May 18, 2007 (EDT)
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Never even thought about trying that actually so thanks! I imagine a spray would be better than a stick right?

7:51 p.m. on May 18, 2007 (EDT)
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Sort of along the same lines (although not an antiperspirant), Body Glide prevents blisters and chaffing and can be used on your feet. It comes in a stick form (neater and easier to apply) and you can apply it anywhere you have rubbing from shoes, socks, clothes, skin, etc. It's not greasy and has no odor.

Although it's not an antiperspirant and might not solve your foot-sweat-problem, using it with socks that wick well (among others I especially like my Under Armour ones, as well as SmartWool) might help since it protects the skin from moisture, but doesn't dry it, so you don't have to worry about dry, cracked skin like Brian mentioned above.

It comes in a few different formulas and you can read more about it here: http://www.bodyglide.com/faq/faq.html

10:08 p.m. on May 18, 2007 (EDT)
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Hi Alicia, does the Bodyglide also prevent calluses from forming?

9:58 a.m. on May 19, 2007 (EDT)
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One description of Body Glide I read mentions helping to prevent calluses and corns (by preventing dry skin). It wouldn’t remove the source of the pressure on your foot that causes the calluses (namely your shoe and/or sock), but since it reduces friction and dry skin it could help that way. I’d definitely give it a try.

I actually haven’t used Body Glide on my feet yet. I bought my first stick this winter for chaffing on my torso and legs while running. But since this thread came up I think I’m going to try it out on my feet too, especially when breaking in new boots. The Body Glide label touts its use on feet and apparently it’s pretty popular with thru hikers and ultra runners. Since you can use it safely anywhere it could have a wide variety of uses while backpacking.

1:19 p.m. on May 19, 2007 (EDT)
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He asked about Fox River socks #2459

2:31 p.m. on May 19, 2007 (EDT)
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"He asked about Fox River socks #2459"

well calamity, then why did you start discussing boots?

I'm a distance runner and buy Body Glide about once a month. great stuff!

It doesn't prevent calouses from forming. Actually, you want calouses!

12:44 p.m. on May 22, 2007 (EDT)
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I haven't had very good luck with Fox River socks for some unknown reason. Two approaches I have found to work well are (1) the widely recommended 2-sock approach where you wear a thin wicking sock as the "skin" layer and a heavier wool sock as the cushioning/insulation layer (how heavy depends on the temperature), and (2) more recently Wright 2-layer socks. The first is what I use for anything requiring boots (my polar region trips or winter backcountry, for example) and the second for hikes that I can use trail-running shoes.

I have found that an all-wool sock, preferably merino, works best for me. For the most part, this means SmartWool. I have not found the all-synthetic to last well, at least on month-long expeditions, even though they do dry out faster than wool or wool blends. But they tend to get hard, where the wool tends to stay soft and still cushions.

I would take a close look at the Fox Rivers that were recommended by Fox River. Without going on their website, I would guess they are of the "hiking" variety, which means a heavier sock, either a synthetic or a synthetic/wool mix, and that they are recommending using the sock as a single layer. One of the big problems I had with the Fox Rivers I used was that they did not wick well (I tend to have warm, sweaty feet, and wet socks tend to promote blistering).

I also use a foot powder intended for long distance runners (Zeasorb-AF) for both the "booted" and "trail-runner" situations, plus an antiperspirant for the plastic boot situation. Since Brian mentions Secret, and I think I may have mentioned to him that I use that, maybe I am the "friend" he is referring to. Anyway, I use Secret because it is a stick and works better at low temperatures (i.e., on Denali or in Antarctica) than sprays. But in both cases, the waste of the overly huge containers is really objectionable (the amount of Secret stick is about 1/4 of the container size).

2:21 p.m. on May 23, 2007 (EDT)
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Thanks for that reply - although you speak mostly about hiking in cold weather. Here in Las Vegas, summer has arrived and I'm sure everyone knows how hot it gets in the desert.

So you're saying I should either wear 2 layers of socks, or buy the "Wright 2-layer sock"? Is there a model number? Which thin wicking sock do you recommend?

9:06 p.m. on May 23, 2007 (EDT)
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Hmmm ... well, trail running shoes aren't exactly "cold weather" gear. The Wright double layer "antiblister" socks basically only differ in whether they are low top (barely peek over the edge of running shoes), or higher. I don't worry about model numbers, just examine the socks in the store, feel them to see if they are about the right weight, then get those. Do a Google search on Wright socks and read their website http://www.wrightsock.com/products.html Wright classifies them according to "running", "walking", etc. But I find the real difference is the person and how the person uses them. I sometimes think sock manufacturers never get out of the design room and actually use them in the real world. Sometimes when I talk to the sales reps, they go on at length about the marvelous range of colors - hey, the sock is inside the boot or shoe, so who cares about the color?

As for double sock systems (for boot type use), I have been using several different ones - lighter for hot weather, slightly heavier for cold weather. The Wigwam Gobi are very light but work well for wicking. They do wear out quickly, though, being so thin. Patagucci and others make heavier wicking socks for cooler weather.

For the wool, heavier ones, as I said, Smartwool has been the best for my uses (YMMV, of course). Again, choose the weight that matches your particular use. I have everything from "Light Hikers" to "Heavy Expedition", and have even used their "Skier" series for hiking (these are halfway up the calf length).

For desert hiking (Mojave, Death Valley, JTree, summer), I sometimes will use either the "Light Hiker" or the "Hiker". Some people might think these are too heavy, but even with my overly warm feet, the thin wicking plus heavy cushion wicks and cushions well and doesn't feel too hot (insulation works both ways, ya know). Mainly, you have to experiment with what works for you.

4:00 a.m. on May 24, 2007 (EDT)
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Well I bought some Smartwool hiking socks from sport chalet today, also picked up that Body Glide stuff so we'll see!

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