Anyone play with the new Soto stoves

6:13 p.m. on October 8, 2009 (EDT)
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Anyone use the new Soto stove. Don't own a butane stove yet. I've been eying up a snowpeak. Never really had the chance to play with the Soto since they are pretty new/

1:41 a.m. on October 11, 2009 (EDT)
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Get a MSR Pocket Rocket...it is an awesome stove....so light. If you are a member of REI it is on sale until the 18th for $29.99! That's hard to beat! If you are not a member, then the savings will pay for most of the membership, and the membership is for life.

10:07 p.m. on October 13, 2009 (EDT)
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Wow and the stoves never seem to go on sale there!

10:25 p.m. on October 13, 2009 (EDT)
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Do not know about the Soto but the Pocket Rocket is great for a basic and light summer stove.For winter use i prefer white gas.This last weekend a friend of mine and i hiked into the Mt Jefferson wilderness area over 7000ft park ridge and camped at 6000ft in the Jefferson Park lakes basin.It was in the low 20's on sunday morning and even though the gaz cartridge spent the night in my sleeping bad the stove sputtered for some time untill the burner head warmed up.Anyway for 3 season use it is a great stove for boiling water,not good for simmering.

11:15 p.m. on October 14, 2009 (EDT)
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Regarding the OPs mention of snowpeak, I have a gigapower (http://www.rei.com/product/643058), and it's excellent. If you go for it, invest in the windscreen ( http://www.rei.com/product/668815) - it really is a big plus.

On the other hand, I've heard great things about the pocket rockets, and at that price you're saving 20 bucks off the rei price for the gigapower. Not bad.

9:45 p.m. on October 22, 2009 (EDT)
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I saw one of these at REI today. They must think they will be a good seller as they had about 6 of them on hand. Retail price-$65. It looks like a nice stove and the pot holders fold down very tightly, so it is very small when packed. No idea how well it works, but their claim on the box is that it is about 50% more efficient in cold weather. If I didn't already have five other stoves, I'd give it some thought.

4:22 p.m. on October 27, 2009 (EDT)
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I ended up picking up the Soto. The pocket rocket was a good deal, but the Soto is much smaller and I was actually pretty impressed with how well it would simmer. The larger burner head produced a nice flame that was very controllable. I also liked the igniger. Although I always bring matches, it is still a nice thing to have. I wasn't sure if I wanted to spend the extra money, but I was pretty impressed by the one REI let me play with in the store.

I've never owned a butane stove, but I've seen other people's struggle in cold weather. I took a quick 3 day trip the other weekend. Since the temps got down to the low 30's I brought my Simmerlight as well. The Soto didn't seem to have any issues. In fact it worked so well, I never unpacked my white gas stove. I'll have to play with it some more as it get's colder. My friend has a pocket rocket. It will be interesting to compare them side by side this winter, although I agree with you guys that I wouldn't rely on it when it gets cold.

4:06 a.m. on October 29, 2009 (EDT)
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There is a lot of information on the net about using butane stoves in cold weather. The simple, non-scientific explanation is that canisters usually contain some mix of butane and propane. What happens is that the butane won't stay in its gaseous state in cold weather like propane will, so as the propane burns off, it leaves the canister with liquid butane in it at around 25F or so that won't burn unless the canister is warmed up. Use a canister in cold weather and after a while, it will have ice on the outside of it as the butane cools off.

There are ways around this, not all of them safe. You see mountaineers using canister stoves at altitude because the lower air pressure enables the stoves to work in colder weather.

I've used a Primus Micron at about 25F or so and it worked as long as the canister was fairly new. The Soto claims to run differently, but I am not sure how they get around the basic physics of the fuel.

October 24, 2014
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