Thinking about getting another tent

4:20 p.m. on January 14, 2010 (EST)
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Recently I've been throwing around the idea of getting another tent. My usual tent is The North Face Vector 22 and I love the thing to death. It's light, extremely packable, simple to set up, and sturdy. The problem is it's my only backpacking tent and I usually tend to go solo as opposed to bringing the lady friend along. I've taken the tent with me on several occasions with and with out the girlfriend and it's worked great every time, but I think now I'd like to have the option of having a solo tent as well. I've been checking out some different tents and two that have caught my attention are the MSR Carbon Reflex 1 and the MSR Hubba. I'd like to see what everyone else thinks is a good tent or if they have one of the two mentioned and if they like them or not. I'm open to all suggestions as I'm going to shop around for a bit but here are some criteria for the new tent:


- Must be under 4 pounds

- I would prefer a freestanding design but it is not essential

- I'm 6'0" so I would like it to be a little roomy

- I would like a tent that holds up well to rain because I like to use down bags

- A fairly decent sized vestibule

- Good ventilation

- Must be pretty sturdy

- Price isn't an issue as long as the tent is worth the money


The usual conditions for this tent will be usually during the spring, summer, and fall in and around Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas and probably a few trips to the Smokies or the Rockies in the summer. I will probably use it for an occasional early winter trip or two. Thanks for any input.

4:50 p.m. on January 14, 2010 (EST)
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Lots o' folks like the TarpTent Rainbow. Here's a link to the double version -- http://www.trailspace.com/gear/tarptent/double-rainbow/ ... but there's also a single.

Buddy of mine has hiked the world over in his MSR Hubba: http://www.trailspace.com/gear/msr/hubba/

5:54 p.m. on January 14, 2010 (EST)
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Hilleberg Soulo(3lb 12oz)free standing/vestibule

http://estore.websitepros.com/1764795/-strse-152/Hilleberg-Soulo-Dome-Tent/Detail.bok

Soulo review

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/hilleberg/soulo/review/14659/

Hilleberg Unna(3lb 13oz)free standing/no vestibule

http://estore.websitepros.com/1764795/-strse-60/Hilleberg-Unna-Ultralight-Tent/Detail.bok

I was looking at getting the Akto but was told about these models. Reviewed them quite a bit and they are both pretty bomb proof from what I have read. The Unna has enough interior space that you can keep gear in there with you. I personally like a tent w/a vestibule but was not sure of your needs as far as the possibility of cooking in the vestibule, etc. Just thought I would throw it out there.

6:54 p.m. on January 14, 2010 (EST)
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Hilleberg Soulo(3lb 12oz)free standing/vestibule

http://estore.websitepros.com/1764795/-strse-152/Hilleberg-Soulo-Dome-Tent/Detail.bok

Soulo review

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/hilleberg/soulo/review/14659/

Hilleberg Unna(3lb 13oz)free standing/no vestibule

http://estore.websitepros.com/1764795/-strse-60/Hilleberg-Unna-Ultralight-Tent/Detail.bok

I was looking at getting the Akto but was told about these models. Reviewed them quite a bit and they are both pretty bomb proof from what I have read. The Unna has enough interior space that you can keep gear in there with you. I personally like a tent w/a vestibule but was not sure of your needs as far as the possibility of cooking in the vestibule, etc. Just thought I would throw it out there.


Thanks for the replies. I should have mentioned that I would like to be able to have a vestibule that I can cook in or store my gear in without it getting soaked. I would like to have room in the tent for some gear but I know that isn't a possibility with many solo tents. I would like some pockets or a gear loft but again I won't cry if the tent doesn't have it.

7:00 p.m. on January 14, 2010 (EST)
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When you look at the Hubba and then at the Hubba Hubba you see there isn't much of a different and for that a bit of extra wight I'll go with the 2 man Hubba Hubba. I think that if I would be shopping for a light tent I would look at the tarptents.

7:22 p.m. on January 14, 2010 (EST)
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The Soulo would most likely do the trick for ya more so than the Unna. Yeah it is pricey but then again if ya ever do any winter trips you are covered. Its a 4 season solo shelter.

7:27 p.m. on January 14, 2010 (EST)
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When you look at the Hubba and then at the Hubba Hubba you see there isn't much of a different and for that a bit of extra wight I'll go with the 2 man Hubba Hubba. I think that if I would be shopping for a light tent I would look at the tarptents.


Yeah, that's why I was looking at the MSR Carbon Reflex 1. It's considerably lighter than the MSR Hubba but the design is very similar. I'd like to know more about some of the tarptents out there but I wouldn't know where to start...

8:15 p.m. on January 14, 2010 (EST)
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...I should have mentioned that I would like to be able to have a vestibule that I can cook in or store my gear in without it getting soaked. ...

A vestibule of sufficient size works well for keeping your gear from getting soaked. If the tent does not have one, you can rig one easily using something like the Integral Designs SilTarp (5 ounces) or the larger ST 2 or 3. But you can also put a large plastic garbage bag over your pack and keep it from getting soaked.

Cooking in a vestibule is only marginally less risky than cooking inside the tent. You still have the fire risk, and depending on how you set the vestibule, you still have some risk of CO and oxygen depletion. Tent materials are flammable, especially if you get an open flame (e.g. backpack stove) within 5 feet of the material (as can easily happen when priming a white gas stove). If you are going to cook in the vestibule, at least light the stove well outside, then when it is running correctly, bring it into the vestibule, which you keep open for ventilation (yeah, yeah, I know, mountaineers cook in their tents all the time. But more than a few have had "incidents")

9:38 p.m. on January 14, 2010 (EST)
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mluna785 said:

...I should have mentioned that I would like to be able to have a vestibule that I can cook in or store my gear in without it getting soaked. ...

A vestibule of sufficient size works well for keeping your gear from getting soaked. If the tent does not have one, you can rig one easily using something like the Integral Designs SilTarp (5 ounces) or the larger ST 2 or 3. But you can also put a large plastic garbage bag over your pack and keep it from getting soaked.

Cooking in a vestibule is only marginally less risky than cooking inside the tent. You still have the fire risk, and depending on how you set the vestibule, you still have some risk of CO and oxygen depletion. Tent materials are flammable, especially if you get an open flame (e.g. backpack stove) within 5 feet of the material (as can easily happen when priming a white gas stove). If you are going to cook in the vestibule, at least light the stove well outside, then when it is running correctly, bring it into the vestibule, which you keep open for ventilation (yeah, yeah, I know, mountaineers cook in their tents all the time. But more than a few have had "incidents")


Oh, I understand completely. What I mean by cooking in the vestibule is I would like a vestibule that is large enough that when it is open I won't get a shower of rain inside my tent. When I feel I need to cook in the vestibule I always have it open and the stove (Snow Peak Lite Max) is always outside the actual tent and away from the material, just outside the vestibule.

11:38 p.m. on January 15, 2010 (EST)
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I had a TarpTent Contrail for 3 years and liked it a lot. But I sold it and bought the new TT Moment which I love.

Daymn! That Moment has everything I needed in a 3 season tent. Nice wide vestibule, even faster setup than the Contrail, very wind stable and excellent ventilation, or not, depending on how you close off the ventilation. Many thoughtful details that shows the thorough design and testing Henry Shires did before he brought it to market.

Eric

11:42 p.m. on January 15, 2010 (EST)
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Oh, yeah, the Moment's vestibule covers your pack (to the left of the inner "door") with room to cook out of the weather at the same time. And the canopy door opens W/O letting rain in on the floor.

Best of all, with stuff sack and 2 stakes it weighs 28 oz. give or take an ounce.

1:05 a.m. on January 16, 2010 (EST)
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Bill S

Five feet from flame to tent. Is that the new boyscout rule? Does it have to be a real tent or do you also need five feet between a virtual fire and a virtual tent, like say you were setting it up on your computer for a virtual merit badge?

I've seen videos of actual real tents being set on fire on purpose and even then they mostly slowly melt unless subjected to a lot of fire with little wind. They do not flash burn.

As for carbon monoxide, the problem is with poorly designed stoves where the flame hits the bottom of the pan BEFORE the carbon monoxide is completely turned into carbon dioxide. Raising the pot supports one inch is said to almost eliminate carbon monoxide (a product of incomplete burning) from being released.

I would like to add - when you burn a wood match look at the flame. The actual flame does not touch the wood, it starts a bit above the wood. First the heat of the flame gasifies the hydrocarbons in the wood below into carbon monoxide and hydrogen, then rising air mixes with these and first hydrogen is converted to water and then the carbon monoxide is converted to carbon dioxide, unless the process is interfered with. The "wood gas' mixed with air consists of about 20% Hydrogen, 20% carbon monoxide and almost 60% nitrogen.

Fact is if you burn ANY hydrocarbon the same thing happens. So I wonder why my Bibler hanging stove hasn't killed me or burned down my tent?

Bill or Alicia perhaps you can bring this up at the camping gear show with stove manufacturers, I'll bet they say the extra pot support height would make the stoves prohibitively heavy or top heavy.

Mluna - if you want a lighter tent get a hoop tent - it drives me nuts when I read the ads for tents that imply that staking is optional so therefore they don't have to add the weight of the stakes to the tent, and then say "oh yes we put a filmy worthless floor in it too" so you need an optional tent footprint which we also do not add the weight of to our specs.

My avatar here is of my Bibler Eldorado - 4 pounds 4 ounces with 5 aluminum stakes, its ancient and the driest tent I have ever used and a palace for one and ok for two. My summer tent is also roomy for one and a squeeze for two friendly people but its also 20 years old and weighs 3 pounds 4 ounces again with stakes and neither need a tent footprint. Its a Sierra Designs Flashmagic, both tents are single walled, the flashmagic is a hoop tent. However to be fair, I would not cook in the flashmagic.

Jim S

2:23 a.m. on January 16, 2010 (EST)
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I would not suggest a Hilleberg Soulo, for the uses you outline. I have had two of them and like them very much for cool/cold weather solo camping, but, they are not well vented for hot weather and there is a better choice, IMHO.

I would buy an Integral Designs "Yukon" for your uses and it will last you many years of hard use, with proper care. This tent will handle any weather that you would even consider going out in and I would not hesitate to use it in the mountains of BC, even during the winter.

You can add a vestibule that comes in two sizes to it, or, use an ID Siltarp to cook under, as most of us here do in remote sheep hunting and dly-in camps. I much prefer to cook well away from my tent for reasons of fire safety and I do not want ANY food odours in the fabric of my tent as all of my camping is in Grizzly country.

This "Yukon" model is one of the two "most useful" tents for a solo "all arounder" that I know of, the other is the Hillberg "Jannu". I have two Hilleberg and two I.D. tents at present and won't buy anything else as they are so good.

I hope this helps.

3:49 p.m. on January 16, 2010 (EST)
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Thanks for the input everyone. I'll have to look around some more now. Thanks!

7:00 p.m. on January 16, 2010 (EST)
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I like the design of the Hubba and the carbon is the same tent just different materials. Yep if you go with the carbon 1 it's lighter then the hubba hubba but still not very roomy. I think that my point/problem is that I had them both set next to each other and it's just doesn't look right - it's seems as the different (in size) are very small and I think that the Hubba Hubba make a great tent but making it smaller into the hubba just doesn't pay off - when you look at the tarptent you get something really light but roomy at the same time and this is what I like about them. If you are not going to use it in a cold whether then you will enjoy the vent design on the tarptents. Try to go to REI or any of the shops that stock both hubbas or Carbon and you will see what I mean. And not that I have any first hand experience with it but I been told that the carbon poles are more likely to break if you don't handle them right. WHEN I will buy my tarptent it'll be a cloudburst2 as I think it's the most well balance of them and as much as I like a free standing tent I can live without it if it pay out with wight/space.

3:04 p.m. on February 2, 2010 (EST)
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Check out the Sierra Designs Iota. I love mine!

11:45 p.m. on February 5, 2010 (EST)
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Re: Thinking about getting tent (TT MOMENT)

I have a TarpTent Moment and, at 28 oz. I think it is THE state of the art for a 3 season solo tent. It meets all of your criteria.

Name me another tent at that weight or less that has all of the Moment's good points. I had a TT Contrail for 3 summers and liked it but I love that Moment.

Eric

1:06 a.m. on February 6, 2010 (EST)
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Eric,


I look into those. Thanks for the heads up!

 

-Matt

3:57 p.m. on February 6, 2010 (EST)
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Thanks for the replies. I should have mentioned that I would like to be able to have a vestibule that I can cook in or store my gear in without it getting soaked. I would like to have room in the tent for some gear but I know that isn't a possibility with many solo tents. I would like some pockets or a gear loft but again I won't cry if the tent doesn't have it.

I could recommend the 1-man tent I use, the Exped Vela I. It's very long (I'm 187cm and have plenty of leg room in it), light and very easy to put up.

The biggest strength is the vestibule, it's roughly half of the fly. So when the weather is nice you can roll back the fly half way and have tons of ventilation (and a panoramic view) while still getting some protection from those early morning showers. And when the weather sucks, you have loads of room for wet gear, muddy boots and cooking.

You can see there the large area in the vestibule.

1:38 a.m. on February 9, 2010 (EST)
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Tomas,


Thanks for the input. I'm looking at these tents now. Thanks.

9:15 p.m. on February 10, 2010 (EST)
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Just remember if looking for a "summer" tent dont go overboard because some ,many,of the cold weather more winter tents are very warm in the summer months.Being a climber and backpacker for years i just dont like using "winter" tents in the summer.Also there is a trade off with the tarp tents...condensation.At least in the pnw.Read some reviews on NWhiker.net and portlandhikers.org for more info on this issue.They are nice and lite but all tents of good and bad points,none are perfect.ymmv

4:45 p.m. on February 11, 2010 (EST)
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See my response to Solo Tents and Tents under Beginners in the forums. My Shangri-La weighs one one under 3 lbs and is large enough for me to stand on my knees (I am 6' 7" tall) and it has plenty of room for my self and my gear.

8:56 a.m. on April 3, 2010 (EDT)
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